Solved Changed motherboard and CPU. Windows survived, but every boot it wants to reset the PIN/Password


Coram Daes

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This may be related: Updated BIOS - now can't log in to windows??

Please observe this is not about the comp in my specs.

W11 21H2 (22000.739)
I upgraded my wives computer, changed a lot, it was running W11 before, and I wasn't really expecting the OS to survive, but it did. Changed the Motherboard and the CPU plus added a GPU. When booting Windows detected devices and started, no issues. But after a first reboot it told me to change PIN for Security reasons..

Your PIN is no longer available due to a change in the security settings on this device

I entered some random chars, used the three question method to reset the PIN, and could login. She works a few days on the computer, and then, lo and behold, repeat process. Upon testing I have realized it does this at EVERY reboot.

The weird thing is that the computer has a second account that I use for monitoring and system access, that has not this issue. At all.

This has probably something to do with what was mentioned in the above linked thread, yet still, not really the same. The Motherboard is an AMD ( Prime A320I-K ) and it has TPM activated and latest BIOS. I also checked Windows Defender and other settings in the computer, and nothing is giving any warnings, also checked the MS account and the "device listing" on MS site, and all checks out.

The BIOS has the option to change between Firmware TPM and Discreet TPM, but it does not seem to make any difference and frankly I am not sure about the difference.

Messing with the comp on and off, just let me know if you need more info.
 

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    11
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop
    Manufacturer/Model
    Homebrew
    CPU
    AMD Ryzen 5 2600X Six-Core Processor
    Motherboard
    ASUS TUF B450M-PRO GAMING
    Memory
    2 x 16GB Kingston KHX3200c 1604/16GX
    Graphics Card(s)
    AMD Radeon RX 5600 XT
    Sound Card
    /
    Monitor(s) Displays
    2 x Dell U2720Q
    Screen Resolution
    2 x 3869x2160
    Hard Drives
    NVME Samsung 960 EVO Pro
    Case
    Fractal Design 7 Compact
    Cooling
    Air
    Keyboard
    Roccat Horde Aimo
    Mouse
    Logitech G703
    Internet Speed
    100/100
    Browser
    Edge
    Antivirus
    Bitdefender Total

Coram Daes

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I may have found the cause. Will do some additional testing, but

I went through account and sign-in options and found that the Windows Hello contraption was not set to sign in with a pin.

... aaaand that was not enough, had to make sure the sign in option was set to password. Anyhow fixed.
Kinda disappointing, I was all prepped and ready to hack bios and tpm stuff, and turns out to be a Windows account setting.
 
Last edited:

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    11
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop
    Manufacturer/Model
    Homebrew
    CPU
    AMD Ryzen 5 2600X Six-Core Processor
    Motherboard
    ASUS TUF B450M-PRO GAMING
    Memory
    2 x 16GB Kingston KHX3200c 1604/16GX
    Graphics Card(s)
    AMD Radeon RX 5600 XT
    Sound Card
    /
    Monitor(s) Displays
    2 x Dell U2720Q
    Screen Resolution
    2 x 3869x2160
    Hard Drives
    NVME Samsung 960 EVO Pro
    Case
    Fractal Design 7 Compact
    Cooling
    Air
    Keyboard
    Roccat Horde Aimo
    Mouse
    Logitech G703
    Internet Speed
    100/100
    Browser
    Edge
    Antivirus
    Bitdefender Total

hsehestedt

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I hope that what you found resolves the issue for you, but I just wanted to comment regarding the TPM. You had noted not being sure what the difference is between a firmware and discreet TPM.

Please see the section called "TPM Implementations" in this article:


Bottom line: If your system has both options available, the preferred option should be to use the discreet TPM.
 

My Computers

System One System Two

  • OS
    Windows 11 21H2
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop
    Manufacturer/Model
    Home Built
    CPU
    Intel i7-11700K
    Motherboard
    ASUS Prime Z590-A
    Memory
    128GB Crucial Ballistix 3200MHz DRAM
    Graphics Card(s)
    No GPU - CPU graphics only (for now)
    Sound Card
    Realtek (on motherboard)
    Monitor(s) Displays
    HP Envy 32
    Screen Resolution
    2560 x 1440
    Hard Drives
    1 x 1TB NVMe Gen 4 x 4 SSD
    1 x 2TB NVMe Gen 3 x 4 SSD
    2 x 512GB 2.5" SSDs
    2 x 8TB HD
    PSU
    Corsair HX850i
    Case
    Corsair iCue 5000X RGB
    Cooling
    Noctua NH-D15 chromax.black cooler + 10 case fans
    Keyboard
    CODE backlit mechanical keyboard
    Mouse
    Logitech MX Master 3
    Internet Speed
    300Mb down / 20Mb up
    Browser
    Chromium Edge
    Antivirus
    Windows Defender
    Other Info
    Additional options installed:
    WiFi 6E PCIe adapter
    ASUS ThunderboltEX 4 PCIe adapter
  • Operating System
    Windows 11 21H2
    Computer type
    Laptop
    Manufacturer/Model
    HP Spectre x360 15-BL012DX
    CPU
    Intel i7-7500U
    Memory
    32GB
    Graphics card(s)
    Dual Intel HD 620 and Nvidia GeForce 940MX
    Sound Card
    Built-in Realtek HD Audio
    Monitor(s) Displays
    4k 15-inch
    Screen Resolution
    4k (3840 x 2160)
    Hard Drives
    1TB Seagate FireCuda 510 NVMe SSD
    Internet Speed
    300Mb down / 20Mb up
    Browser
    Chromium Edge
    Antivirus
    Windows Defender
    Other Info
    RAM Upgraded from 16GB to 32GB WiFi Upgraded from WiFi 5 to WiFi 6 SSD upgraded from 512GB NVMe SSD to 1TB Seagate FireCuda 510 NVMe SSD

Coram Daes

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  • Discrete TPMs are dedicated chips that implement TPM functionality in their own tamper resistant semiconductor package. They are theoretically the most secure type of TPM because the routines implemented in hardware should be[vague] more resistant to bugs[clarification needed] versus routines implemented in software, and their packages are required to implement some tamper resistance. For example the TPM for your brake controller in your car, so that it does not get hacked by sophisticated methods.[32]
  • Firmware TPMs (fTPMs) are firmware-based (e.g. UEFI) solutions that run in a CPU's trusted execution environment. Intel, AMD and Qualcomm have implemented firmware TPMs.
Ok, little wiser, thanks. Then I should probably set it to Discrete, as separate TPM chip...

I did read up before W11 installation on my computers some months ago, but all I checked by then was the fTPM availability on my AMD boards, even pondering buying an extra chip if needed. Then suddenly with a BIOS update fTPM became available....
 

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    11
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop
    Manufacturer/Model
    Homebrew
    CPU
    AMD Ryzen 5 2600X Six-Core Processor
    Motherboard
    ASUS TUF B450M-PRO GAMING
    Memory
    2 x 16GB Kingston KHX3200c 1604/16GX
    Graphics Card(s)
    AMD Radeon RX 5600 XT
    Sound Card
    /
    Monitor(s) Displays
    2 x Dell U2720Q
    Screen Resolution
    2 x 3869x2160
    Hard Drives
    NVME Samsung 960 EVO Pro
    Case
    Fractal Design 7 Compact
    Cooling
    Air
    Keyboard
    Roccat Horde Aimo
    Mouse
    Logitech G703
    Internet Speed
    100/100
    Browser
    Edge
    Antivirus
    Bitdefender Total
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