Solved Deleting recovery partitions


Birk

Member
Local time
11:43 PM
Posts
41
OS
Win0, Soon Win11
This is a my experience with deleting excess recovery partitions after reading this post:


Here's my Disk Management screen before I started:

Screenshot_1.jpg

It looks like this because my C: went through updates from 7 ==> 8 ==>10 ==>11. I"ve never done a clean Windows install since doing that with Win7.

I decided to try deleting the excess Recovery Partitions which I believed were all those to the right of the 621 MB partition. So I cranked up an Admin Terminal and did this:

Screenshot_3.jpg

I should have investigated the need to retain the EFI partition, but I didn't. I just kept going. After deleting all the other Recovery partitions I ended up with this:

Screenshot_2.jpg

This looked pretty good to me (yes, I know there are ways to reclaim the Unallocated spaces) so I rebooted and (of course) got a B(lack)SOD. So I ran Macrium Reflect's Fix Boot Drive routine and rebooted again. This got me my system back OK. Now it looks like this:

Screenshot_4.jpg

I guess the moral to this story is don't mess with things unless you've got a good way to recover.

Edit: Now my Macrium backup file reduced in size from 33.9 GB to 32.4 GB and the backup time went from 7:42 to 6:38.
 
Last edited:

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    Win0, Soon Win11
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop
    Manufacturer/Model
    Custom build
    CPU
    Intel i7 8700 @ 3.20 GHz
    Motherboard
    Asus B360-M
    Memory
    16 GB
    Graphics Card(s)
    none
    Sound Card
    none
    Monitor(s) Displays
    Primary: LG 4K; Secondary: Dell U2412M
    Screen Resolution
    Primary: 3860 x 2160; Secondary: 1200 x 1920
    Hard Drives
    C: Samsung NVme SSD970 256K
    E: 1 TB HDD
    F: 500K HDD
    W: Samsung SSD 840 128K
    Keyboard
    Logitech Lighted
    Mouse
    Kensington ExpertMouse trackball
    Internet Speed
    500/500
    Browser
    Brave
    Antivirus
    Windows Defender

idgat

Active member
Member
VIP
Local time
4:43 PM
Posts
132
Location
Newcastle NSW AUS
OS
Windows 11
Not quite sure what all the above was about (short attention span, sorry, too much to read and take in - apart from 3 recovery partitions ... Wha???), but ....

After a new install + full update, but before any software was installed (and same was for Win 10), I always do a Macrium image, then install AOMEI and/or MiniTool, and delete the recovery partition. Then restore the resultant unallocated space to another partition.

Never had any regrets.

ADDENDUM. Rationale : never had any need to use the recovery, and find that there are too many posts in multiple threads and forums across the www about users with failed recovery attempts.

If I'm dealing with someone else's computer, I do the original image twice ( 2 separate images saved on 2 separate external devices -- tin-foil hat theory no. 176), and then remove the recovery partition. Inexperienced users ending up with borked systems because of confusion between repair, recovery and restore were the meat and bread of my IT consultancy experience in a previous life.
 

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    Windows 11
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop
    Manufacturer/Model
    HP
    CPU
    Intel i5-9400
    Memory
    8GB
    Graphics Card(s)
    NVIDIA GeForce GT730
    Monitor(s) Displays
    Samsung 32"
    Screen Resolution
    1920x1080
    Hard Drives
    2 x 1TB SSDs
    Internet Speed
    Classic Australian w.a.p.
    Antivirus
    KIS

NavyLCDR

Well-known member
Power User
VIP
Local time
11:43 PM
Posts
820
OS
Windows 11
This is my experience with deleting recovery partitions:

1. reagentc /disable
2. Delete ALL recovery partitions
3. reagentc /enable
 

My Computers

System One System Two

  • OS
    Windows 11
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop
    Manufacturer/Model
    Homebuilt
    CPU
    AMD Ryzen 7 3800XT
    Motherboard
    ASUS ROG Crosshair VII Hero (WiFi)
    Memory
    32GB
    Graphics Card(s)
    EVGA GeForce GTX 1080 Ti
  • Operating System
    Windows 11 Education
    Computer type
    Laptop
    Manufacturer/Model
    Dell Inspiron 7773
    CPU
    Intel i7-8550U
    Memory
    32GB
    Graphics card(s)
    Nvidia Geforce MX150
    Sound Card
    Realtek
    Monitor(s) Displays
    17"
    Screen Resolution
    1920 x 1080
    Hard Drives
    Toshiba 512GB NVMe SSD
    SK Hynix 512GB SATA SSD
    Internet Speed
    Fast!

hsehestedt

Well-known member
Power User
VIP
Local time
1:43 AM
Posts
646
Location
Texas, USA
OS
Windows 11 21H2
Still not an ideal partition layout. The current guidance from MS is to have the recovery partition as the last partition following the Windows partition. The latest versions of Windows 10 and Windows 11 now have the ability to shrink the Windows partition and grow the recovery partition DOWNWARD to use that free space when required. As a result, once you have the correct layout, Windows should never need to create an additional recovery partition again. Here is an example of what it looks like when done correctly:

Image1.jpg

You could use a program to reorganize your partitions or do as NavyLCDR suggested, or, if you ever perform a clean install of Windows again in the future, Windows will create the partitions correctly if you install using the guidance below. Note that this assumes starting off with a blank destination disk where the previously existing partitions have already been removed or where you remove the existing partitions during installation of Windows:

1) If you perform a full manual install, Windows will setup partitions correctly. By "full manual" I mean that you boot from your thumb drive, DVD, etc. and manually go through the installation procedure without automating the installation.

2) If you automate the installation using an autounattend.xml answer file, OMIT the section in the answer file that specifies the disk to install onto and the partition layout. I won't go into the specific details (unless you want me to), but the short of it is that when using an answer file you normally specify the Windows partition be placed last which is precisely what you do not want. By omitting the disk to install onto and the partitioning layout setup will ask you for the location to which it should be installed, just as in a manual installation. The entire rest of the installation would still be automated, however.

NOTE: There are ways to automate the entire process, but it still involves removing those sections from the answer file and creating a script to perform the disk partitioning. If you want this info, let me know and I can provide it, but it is WAY easier to simply manually specify what disk to install onto as noted above.
 

My Computers

System One System Two

  • OS
    Windows 11 21H2
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop
    Manufacturer/Model
    Home Built
    CPU
    Intel i7-11700K
    Motherboard
    ASUS Prime Z590-A
    Memory
    128GB Crucial Ballistix 3200MHz DRAM
    Graphics Card(s)
    No GPU - CPU graphics only (for now)
    Sound Card
    Realtek (on motherboard)
    Monitor(s) Displays
    HP Envy 32
    Screen Resolution
    2560 x 1440
    Hard Drives
    1 x 1TB NVMe Gen 4 x 4 SSD
    1 x 2TB NVMe Gen 3 x 4 SSD
    2 x 512GB 2.5" SSDs
    2 x 8TB HD
    PSU
    Corsair HX850i
    Case
    Corsair iCue 5000X RGB
    Cooling
    Noctua NH-D15 chromax.black cooler + 10 case fans
    Keyboard
    CODE backlit mechanical keyboard
    Mouse
    Logitech MX Master 3
    Internet Speed
    300Mb down / 20Mb up
    Browser
    Chromium Edge
    Antivirus
    Windows Defender
    Other Info
    Additional options installed:
    WiFi 6E PCIe adapter
    ASUS ThunderboltEX 4 PCIe adapter
  • Operating System
    Windows 11 21H2
    Computer type
    Laptop
    Manufacturer/Model
    HP Spectre x360 15-BL012DX
    CPU
    Intel i7-7500U
    Memory
    32GB
    Graphics card(s)
    Dual Intel HD 620 and Nvidia GeForce 940MX
    Sound Card
    Built-in Realtek HD Audio
    Monitor(s) Displays
    4k 15-inch
    Screen Resolution
    4k (3840 x 2160)
    Hard Drives
    1TB Seagate FireCuda 510 NVMe SSD
    Internet Speed
    300Mb down / 20Mb up
    Browser
    Chromium Edge
    Antivirus
    Windows Defender
    Other Info
    RAM Upgraded from 16GB to 32GB WiFi Upgraded from WiFi 5 to WiFi 6 SSD upgraded from 512GB NVMe SSD to 1TB Seagate FireCuda 510 NVMe SSD

Birk

Member
Thread Starter
Local time
11:43 PM
Posts
41
OS
Win0, Soon Win11
Very good feedback - thanks. I tried LTCDR's suggestion and got this:

PS C:\Users\Birk> reagentc /info
Windows Recovery Environment (Windows RE) and system reset configuration
Information:

Windows RE status: Disabled
Windows RE location:
Boot Configuration Data (BCD) identifier: 79a4e131-26db-11ec-a889-0492264c4655
Recovery image location:
Recovery image index: 0
Custom image location:
Custom image index: 0

REAGENTC.EXE: Operation Successful.

PS C:\Users\Birk> reagentc /disable
REAGENTC.EXE: Windows RE is already disabled.

PS C:\Users\Birk> reagentc /enable
REAGENTC.EXE: The specified path was not found.

I reckon I could spend a fair amount of time trying to resolve that problem - whatever it is - but I'll probably wait a while and maybe get MiniTool and reposition the partitions.
 

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    Win0, Soon Win11
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop
    Manufacturer/Model
    Custom build
    CPU
    Intel i7 8700 @ 3.20 GHz
    Motherboard
    Asus B360-M
    Memory
    16 GB
    Graphics Card(s)
    none
    Sound Card
    none
    Monitor(s) Displays
    Primary: LG 4K; Secondary: Dell U2412M
    Screen Resolution
    Primary: 3860 x 2160; Secondary: 1200 x 1920
    Hard Drives
    C: Samsung NVme SSD970 256K
    E: 1 TB HDD
    F: 500K HDD
    W: Samsung SSD 840 128K
    Keyboard
    Logitech Lighted
    Mouse
    Kensington ExpertMouse trackball
    Internet Speed
    500/500
    Browser
    Brave
    Antivirus
    Windows Defender

NavyLCDR

Well-known member
Power User
VIP
Local time
11:43 PM
Posts
820
OS
Windows 11
You deleted the active recovery partition. There is no benefit now to keeping any recovery partition.
 

My Computers

System One System Two

  • OS
    Windows 11
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop
    Manufacturer/Model
    Homebuilt
    CPU
    AMD Ryzen 7 3800XT
    Motherboard
    ASUS ROG Crosshair VII Hero (WiFi)
    Memory
    32GB
    Graphics Card(s)
    EVGA GeForce GTX 1080 Ti
  • Operating System
    Windows 11 Education
    Computer type
    Laptop
    Manufacturer/Model
    Dell Inspiron 7773
    CPU
    Intel i7-8550U
    Memory
    32GB
    Graphics card(s)
    Nvidia Geforce MX150
    Sound Card
    Realtek
    Monitor(s) Displays
    17"
    Screen Resolution
    1920 x 1080
    Hard Drives
    Toshiba 512GB NVMe SSD
    SK Hynix 512GB SATA SSD
    Internet Speed
    Fast!

Birk

Member
Thread Starter
Local time
11:43 PM
Posts
41
OS
Win0, Soon Win11
Oh. Hmmmm. I thought I read that the active recovery partition was the one that was next to the C: one.

But ok, so should I delete everything except the C: and the EFI one? And if so, what's the best way to create a valid recovery partition?
 

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    Win0, Soon Win11
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop
    Manufacturer/Model
    Custom build
    CPU
    Intel i7 8700 @ 3.20 GHz
    Motherboard
    Asus B360-M
    Memory
    16 GB
    Graphics Card(s)
    none
    Sound Card
    none
    Monitor(s) Displays
    Primary: LG 4K; Secondary: Dell U2412M
    Screen Resolution
    Primary: 3860 x 2160; Secondary: 1200 x 1920
    Hard Drives
    C: Samsung NVme SSD970 256K
    E: 1 TB HDD
    F: 500K HDD
    W: Samsung SSD 840 128K
    Keyboard
    Logitech Lighted
    Mouse
    Kensington ExpertMouse trackball
    Internet Speed
    500/500
    Browser
    Brave
    Antivirus
    Windows Defender

zbook

Well-known member
Power User
VIP
Local time
1:43 AM
Posts
925
OS
Windows 10
This is an option that may work:

a) Make a free Macrium backup image disk 3
b) Clean install Windows 11 on disk 3
c) Restore only C: data partition
d) Use Macrium boot repair as needed
 

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    Windows 10
    Computer type
    Laptop
    Manufacturer/Model
    HP
    CPU
    Intel(R) Core(TM) i7-4800MQ CPU @ 2.70GHz
    Motherboard
    Product : 190A Version : KBC Version 94.56
    Memory
    16 GB Total: Manufacturer : Samsung MemoryType : DDR3 FormFactor : SODIMM Capacity : 8GB Speed : 1600
    Graphics Card(s)
    NVIDIA Quadro K3100M; Intel(R) HD Graphics 4600
    Sound Card
    IDT High Definition Audio CODEC; PNP Device ID HDAUDIO\FUNC_01&VEN_111D&DEV_76E0
    Hard Drives
    Model Hitachi HTS727575A9E364
    Antivirus
    Microsoft Defender
    Other Info
    Mobile Workstation

Stigg

Well-known member
Power User
VIP
Local time
4:43 PM
Posts
753
OS
Windows 11 Pro
I've seen instructions in the past for manually creating a new Recovery partition. I think it can be done.

Maybe try reading this recent thread.

There may be other easier instructions to be found somewhere.
 

My Computers

System One System Two

  • OS
    Windows 11 Pro
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop
    Manufacturer/Model
    Stigg's Build
    CPU
    Intel Core i9-10900X
    Motherboard
    GIGABYTE X299X DESIGNARE 10G
    Memory
    Corsair 64 GB (4 x 16 GB) CMW64GX4M4C3000C15 Vengeance RGB Pro 3000Mhz DDR4
    Graphics Card(s)
    GIGABYTE GeForce GTX 1660 Super Mini ITX 6 GB OC
    Sound Card
    Realtek ALC1220
    Monitor(s) Displays
    Samsung 27" FHD LED FreeSync Gaming Monitor (LS27F350FHEXXY)
    Screen Resolution
    1920 x 1080
    Hard Drives
    Samsung 970 Pro Series 1TB M.2 2280 NVMe SSD
    Western Digital Red Pro WD8003FFBX-68B9AN0 8 TB, 7200 RPM, SATA-III
    Western Digital Red Pro WD8003FFBX-68B9AN0 8 TB, 7200 RPM, SATA-III
    PSU
    Corsair HX1200 1200W 80 Plus Platinum
    Case
    Fractal Design Define 7 Black Solid Case
    Cooling
    Noctua NH-D15 Chromax Black
    Keyboard
    Razer Ornata V2
    Mouse
    Razer DeathAdder Essential
    Internet Speed
    FTTN 100Mbps / 40Mbps
    Browser
    Mozilla Firefox
    Antivirus
    N/A
    Other Info
    Logitech BRIO 4k Ultra HD USB-C Webcam
  • Operating System
    Windows 10 Pro
    Computer type
    Laptop
    Manufacturer/Model
    ASUS ROG Zephyrus M GM501GS
    CPU
    Core i7-8750H
    Motherboard
    Zephyrus M GM501GS
    Memory
    SK Hynix 32 GB (2 x 16 GB) HMA82GS6CJR8N-VK 16 GB DDR4-2666 DDR4 SDRAM
    Graphics card(s)
    NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1070
    Sound Card
    Realtek ALC294
    Monitor(s) Displays
    AU Optronics B156HAN07.1 [15.6" LCD]
    Screen Resolution
    1920 x 1080
    Hard Drives
    Samsung MZVKW512HMJP-00000 512 GB, PCI-E 3.0 x4
    Samsung SSD 860 QVO 4TB 4 TB, SATA-III
    PSU
    N/A
    Case
    N/A
    Cooling
    N/A
    Mouse
    Razer DeathAdder Essential
    Keyboard
    PC/AT Enhanced PS2 Keyboard (101/102-Key)
    Internet Speed
    FTTN 100Mbps / 40Mbps
    Browser
    Mozilla Firefox
    Antivirus
    N/A
    Other Info
    USB2.0 HD UVC Webcam

cereberus

Well-known member
Power User
VIP
Local time
7:43 AM
Posts
1,706
OS
Windows 10 Pro + others in VHDs
There is an easy way to restore the recovery partition. Just download latest iso, mount it and run setup.exe to do an repair installation.
 

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    Windows 10 Pro + others in VHDs
    Computer type
    Laptop
    Manufacturer/Model
    ASUS Vivobook 14
    CPU
    I7
    Motherboard
    Yep, Laptop has one.
    Memory
    16 GB
    Graphics Card(s)
    Integrated Intel Iris XE
    Sound Card
    Realtek built in
    Monitor(s) Displays
    N/A
    Screen Resolution
    1920x1080
    Hard Drives
    1 TB Optane NVME SSD, 1 TB NVME SSD
    PSU
    Yep, got one
    Case
    Yep, got one
    Cooling
    Stella Artois
    Keyboard
    Built in
    Mouse
    Bluetooth , wired
    Internet Speed
    72 Mb/s :-(
    Browser
    Edge mostly
    Antivirus
    Defender
    Other Info
    TPM 2.0

NavyLCDR

Well-known member
Power User
VIP
Local time
11:43 PM
Posts
820
OS
Windows 11
Oh. Hmmmm. I thought I read that the active recovery partition was the one that was next to the C: one.

But ok, so should I delete everything except the C: and the EFI one? And if so, what's the best way to create a valid recovery partition?
The active recovery partition is the one that reagentc /info says it is using. There is no guarantee as to which partition it will be.

Near the end of this thread are instructions to reinstall the recovery environment:
 
Last edited:

My Computers

System One System Two

  • OS
    Windows 11
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop
    Manufacturer/Model
    Homebuilt
    CPU
    AMD Ryzen 7 3800XT
    Motherboard
    ASUS ROG Crosshair VII Hero (WiFi)
    Memory
    32GB
    Graphics Card(s)
    EVGA GeForce GTX 1080 Ti
  • Operating System
    Windows 11 Education
    Computer type
    Laptop
    Manufacturer/Model
    Dell Inspiron 7773
    CPU
    Intel i7-8550U
    Memory
    32GB
    Graphics card(s)
    Nvidia Geforce MX150
    Sound Card
    Realtek
    Monitor(s) Displays
    17"
    Screen Resolution
    1920 x 1080
    Hard Drives
    Toshiba 512GB NVMe SSD
    SK Hynix 512GB SATA SSD
    Internet Speed
    Fast!

TheMystic

Well-known member
Power User
VIP
Local time
12:13 PM
Posts
696
OS
Windows 11
what's the best way to create a valid recovery partition?
You have the answer here:

 

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    Windows 11
    Computer type
    Laptop
    Manufacturer/Model
    HP Envy dv7
    CPU
    Intel Core i7 3630QM
    Motherboard
    HP
    Memory
    16 GB
    Graphics Card(s)
    Intel HD Graphics 4000 & Nvidia GeForce GT 635M
    Sound Card
    IDT High Definition
    Screen Resolution
    1080p
    Hard Drives
    1 TB Crucial MX500 on bay 1.
    1 TB Seagate HDD on bay 2.
    Antivirus
    Windows Defender

Birk

Member
Thread Starter
Local time
11:43 PM
Posts
41
OS
Win0, Soon Win11
Good news - I was able to recreate the Recovery partition like this (thanks again to LTCDR for the reference):

PS C:\Users\Birk> reagentc /info
Windows Recovery Environment (Windows RE) and system reset configuration
Information:

Windows RE status: Disabled
Windows RE location:
Boot Configuration Data (BCD) identifier: 79a4e131-26db-11ec-a889-0492264c4655
Recovery image location:
Recovery image index: 0
Custom image location:
Custom image index: 0

REAGENTC.EXE: Operation Successful.

PS C:\Users\Birk> reagentc /enable
REAGENTC.EXE: Operation Successful.

PS C:\Users\Birk> reagentc /info
Windows Recovery Environment (Windows RE) and system reset configuration
Information:

Windows RE status: Enabled
Windows RE location: \\?\GLOBALROOT\device\harddisk3\partition2\Recovery\WindowsRE
Boot Configuration Data (BCD) identifier: 742c8395-5f83-11ec-976d-0492264c4655
Recovery image location:
Recovery image index: 0
Custom image location:
Custom image index: 0

REAGENTC.EXE: Operation Successful.

So now my drive looks like this:
Screenshot_1.jpg

I've read various posts that say the EFI partition should be either first or last, but it's clear it can be anywhere. So it looks to me like I need to get Minitool and interchange the position of the 621 MB Recovery partition and the 1.06 GB unallocated partition, and then expand the C: partition to include the 1.06GB that's currently useless.

Some posts have implied that the EFI partition may need to get bigger, so I'm OK with leaving 452 MB unallocated for that eventuality (if it ever occurs.) The contents of my C: drive (Windows & apps only, no data) is only about 58MB, so I need not be greedy for space.
 

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    Win0, Soon Win11
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop
    Manufacturer/Model
    Custom build
    CPU
    Intel i7 8700 @ 3.20 GHz
    Motherboard
    Asus B360-M
    Memory
    16 GB
    Graphics Card(s)
    none
    Sound Card
    none
    Monitor(s) Displays
    Primary: LG 4K; Secondary: Dell U2412M
    Screen Resolution
    Primary: 3860 x 2160; Secondary: 1200 x 1920
    Hard Drives
    C: Samsung NVme SSD970 256K
    E: 1 TB HDD
    F: 500K HDD
    W: Samsung SSD 840 128K
    Keyboard
    Logitech Lighted
    Mouse
    Kensington ExpertMouse trackball
    Internet Speed
    500/500
    Browser
    Brave
    Antivirus
    Windows Defender

NavyLCDR

Well-known member
Power User
VIP
Local time
11:43 PM
Posts
820
OS
Windows 11
My system partitions have always been 100 MB
 

My Computers

System One System Two

  • OS
    Windows 11
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop
    Manufacturer/Model
    Homebuilt
    CPU
    AMD Ryzen 7 3800XT
    Motherboard
    ASUS ROG Crosshair VII Hero (WiFi)
    Memory
    32GB
    Graphics Card(s)
    EVGA GeForce GTX 1080 Ti
  • Operating System
    Windows 11 Education
    Computer type
    Laptop
    Manufacturer/Model
    Dell Inspiron 7773
    CPU
    Intel i7-8550U
    Memory
    32GB
    Graphics card(s)
    Nvidia Geforce MX150
    Sound Card
    Realtek
    Monitor(s) Displays
    17"
    Screen Resolution
    1920 x 1080
    Hard Drives
    Toshiba 512GB NVMe SSD
    SK Hynix 512GB SATA SSD
    Internet Speed
    Fast!

Birk

Member
Thread Starter
Local time
11:43 PM
Posts
41
OS
Win0, Soon Win11
Minitool really does make it easy to do these things. Now my drive looks like this:

Screenshot_2.jpg

This looks good to me. For some odd reason my wallpaper image disappeared, but that's easily fixed.
 

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    Win0, Soon Win11
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop
    Manufacturer/Model
    Custom build
    CPU
    Intel i7 8700 @ 3.20 GHz
    Motherboard
    Asus B360-M
    Memory
    16 GB
    Graphics Card(s)
    none
    Sound Card
    none
    Monitor(s) Displays
    Primary: LG 4K; Secondary: Dell U2412M
    Screen Resolution
    Primary: 3860 x 2160; Secondary: 1200 x 1920
    Hard Drives
    C: Samsung NVme SSD970 256K
    E: 1 TB HDD
    F: 500K HDD
    W: Samsung SSD 840 128K
    Keyboard
    Logitech Lighted
    Mouse
    Kensington ExpertMouse trackball
    Internet Speed
    500/500
    Browser
    Brave
    Antivirus
    Windows Defender

zbook

Well-known member
Power User
VIP
Local time
1:43 AM
Posts
925
OS
Windows 10
Windows will create new recovery partitions during an upgrade when there is insufficient space in an existing recovery partition.

So in the opening thread over time Windows had found insufficient free space and installed new recovery partitions during upgrades.

Compared to Windows 10 there will be fewer featured upgrades for Windows 11.
So there will be fewer tests of the recovery partition.

If you want to see whether the dynamic data / recovery partition is working a test can be made.

The test is performed by making an in place upgrade repair:

If an in place upgrade is performed and Windows needs more than 643 MB for the recovery partition the C: partition should shrink and the recovery partition should expand.

If Windows does not need more than 643 MB for the recovery partition then you will not be able to test the dynamic relationship. Or the recovery partition could become smaller.

If Windows needs more than 643 MB for the recovery partition and the dynamic relationship is not working an additional recovery partition will be created.
 

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    Windows 10
    Computer type
    Laptop
    Manufacturer/Model
    HP
    CPU
    Intel(R) Core(TM) i7-4800MQ CPU @ 2.70GHz
    Motherboard
    Product : 190A Version : KBC Version 94.56
    Memory
    16 GB Total: Manufacturer : Samsung MemoryType : DDR3 FormFactor : SODIMM Capacity : 8GB Speed : 1600
    Graphics Card(s)
    NVIDIA Quadro K3100M; Intel(R) HD Graphics 4600
    Sound Card
    IDT High Definition Audio CODEC; PNP Device ID HDAUDIO\FUNC_01&VEN_111D&DEV_76E0
    Hard Drives
    Model Hitachi HTS727575A9E364
    Antivirus
    Microsoft Defender
    Other Info
    Mobile Workstation
Top Bottom