System Disable Modern Standby in Windows 10 and Windows 11


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Power_banner.png

This tutorial will show you how to disable Modern Standby (S0 Low Power Idle) to enable S3 support on a Windows 10 and Windows 11 device.

In Windows 10 and Windows 11, there are two power models for PCs: S3 and Modern Standby (S0 Low Power Idle). The S3 power model is an older standard and is not capable of the instant on that consumers expect from modern devices. Modern Standby is capable of leveraging all the capabilities of a modern chipset and can be integrated across the breadth of tablets and PCs today. The first iteration of Modern Standby was Connected Standby, which first shipped in Windows 8 and Windows 8.1. Modern Standby expands upon the Windows 8.x Connected Standby concept, allowing for flexibility in component selection and the ability for the OS to manage network connectivity in standby.

Windows 10 and Windows 11 Modern Standby (Modern Standby) expands the Windows 8.1 Connected Standby power model. Connected Standby, and consequently Modern Standby, enable an instant on / instant off user experience, similar to smartphone power models. Just like the phone, the S0 low power idle model enables the system to stay connected to the network while in a low power mode.

Although Modern Standby enables an instant on/off user experience like Connected Standby, Modern Standby is more inclusive than the Windows 8.1 Connected Standby power model. Modern Standby allows for market segments previously limited to the Traditional Sleep (S3) power model to take advantage of the low power idle model. Example systems include systems based on rotational media and hybrid media (for example, SSD + HDD or SSHD) and/or a NIC that doesn’t support all of the prior requirements for Connected Standby.

Modern Standby systems can be connected (enabled), disconnected (disabled), or managed by Windows to allow network connectivity during standby. This behavior is dictated by the hardware and/or by configuration.
  • Connected Modern Standby will allow you to stay connected to the network while in standby to still receive and get notifications about email, VoIP calls, and such, but it will use more battery.
  • Disconnected Modern Standby will allow longer battery life, but you will no longer have the advantages of staying connected to the network while in standby.
  • Managed by Windows will allow Windows to manage network connectivity during standby.
On any Modern Standby system (whether connected or disconnected), the system remains in S0 while in standby, allowing the following scenarios to work:
  • Background activity
  • Faster resume from a low power state
On systems that are connected while in standby, wakes based on specific network patterns may also be set by the operating system to enable apps to receive the latest content such as incoming email, VoIP calls, or news articles.

See also:

If you disabled Modern Standby and your PC crashes when entering S3, you can press and hold the power button to force a hard shut down, press the power button again to turn on, and enable Modern Standby below again.

This can happen if the device OEM has not included support for S3 in the BIOS/UEFI firmware.


You must be signed in as an administrator to enable or disable Modern Standby.

You cannot enable Modern Standby on a device that didn't originally support it.



Contents

  • Option One: Enable or Disable Modern Standby using Command
  • Option Two: Enable or Disable Modern Standby using REG file


EXAMPLE: Modern Standby enabled and disabled

Modern_Standby_enabled.png
powercfg_a-2.png

Modern_Standby_disabled.png





Option One

Enable or Disable Modern Standby using Command


1 Open an elevated command prompt in Windows 10, or open Windows Terminal (Admin) in Windows 11, and select either Windows PowerShell or Command Prompt.

2 Copy and paste the command below you want to use into the console, and press Enter. (see screenshots below)

(Enable Modern Standby - default)​
reg delete "HKLM\System\CurrentControlSet\Control\Power" /v PlatformAoAcOverride /f

Enable_Modern_Standby_command.png

OR​

(Disable Modern Standby)​
reg add HKLM\System\CurrentControlSet\Control\Power /v PlatformAoAcOverride /t REG_DWORD /d 0

Disable_Modern_Standby_command.png

3 Restart the computer to apply.




Option Two

Enable or Disable Modern Standby using REG file


1 Do step 2 (enable) or step 3 (disable) below for what you want.

2 Enable Modern Standby

This is the default setting.


A) Click/tap on the Download button below to download the REG file below, and go to step 4 below.​

Enable_Modern_Standby.reg


(Contents of REG file for reference)
Code:
Windows Registry Editor Version 5.00

[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Control\Power]
"PlatformAoAcOverride"=-

3 Disable Modern Standby

A) Click/tap on the Download button below to download the REG file below, and go to step 4 below.​

Disable_Modern_Standby.reg


(Contents of REG file for reference)
Code:
Windows Registry Editor Version 5.00

[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Control\Power]
"PlatformAoAcOverride"=dword:00000000

4 Save the .reg file to your desktop.

5 Double click/tap on the downloaded .reg file to merge it.

6 When prompted, click/tap on Run, Yes (UAC), Yes, and OK to approve the merge.

7 Restart the computer to apply.

8 You can now delete the downloaded .reg file if you like.


That's it,
Shawn Brink


 

Attachments

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Last edited:
More power consumed "with" network connectivity than without?
=
More power consumed "with" more work done than without?

Really?

Denis

Yep. LOL
 

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    Windows 11 Pro
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    HP Spectre x360 2in1 14-eu0098nr (2024)
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Sorry, I'm getting tired and asked my question very poorly.
What I meant was that you seem to be saying that there's more power consumed with network connectivity off then on but that seems wrong because there's less work to do if it's off.
I'll do the test since you'd like me to but I'm puzzled.
I'll try to keep it in S0 Modern standby for longer as well so I get less inaccurate results.
I cannot run comparable S3 Sleep tests on a comparable S3 Sleep computer until July but I'll post those for you as well. That comparable computer is busy with a longer-term battery-related test that I can't interrupt.

I'm returning & getting a refund for this heap of junk [= a computer that cannot use S3 Sleep].

I'll get back to you tomorrow or Wednesday,
Denis
 

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    Windows 11 Home x64 Version 23H2 Build 22631.3447
Sorry, I'm getting tired and asked my question very poorly.
What I meant was that you seem to be saying that there's more power consumed with network connectivity off then on but that seems wrong because there's less work to do if it's off.
I'll do the test since you'd like me to but I'm puzzled.
I'll try to keep it in S0 Modern standby for longer as well so I get less inaccurate results.
I cannot run comparable S3 Sleep tests on a comparable S3 Sleep computer until July but I'll post those for you as well. That comparable computer is busy with a longer-term battery-related test that I can't interrupt.

I'm returning & getting a refund for this heap of junk [= a computer that cannot use S3 Sleep].

I'll get back to you tomorrow or Wednesday,
Denis
Sorry, no. It'll consume more power with network connectivity enabled.
 

My Computers

System One System Two

  • OS
    Windows 11 Pro for Workstations
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop
    Manufacturer/Model
    Custom self build
    CPU
    Intel i7-8700K 5 GHz
    Motherboard
    ASUS ROG Maximus XI Formula Z390
    Memory
    64 GB (4x16GB) G.SKILL TridentZ RGB DDR4 3600 MHz (F4-3600C18D-32GTZR)
    Graphics Card(s)
    ASUS ROG-STRIX-GTX1080TI-O11G-GAMING (11GB GDDR5X)
    Sound Card
    Integrated Digital Audio (S/PDIF)
    Monitor(s) Displays
    2 x Samsung Odyssey G75 27"
    Screen Resolution
    2560x1440
    Hard Drives
    1TB Samsung 990 PRO M.2,
    4TB Samsung 990 PRO M.2,
    8TB WD MyCloudEX2Ultra NAS
    PSU
    Seasonic Prime Titanium 850W
    Case
    Thermaltake Core P3 wall mounted
    Cooling
    Corsair Hydro H115i
    Keyboard
    Logitech wireless K800
    Mouse
    Logitech MX Master 3
    Internet Speed
    1 Gbps Download and 35 Mbps Upload
    Browser
    Google Chrome
    Antivirus
    Microsoft Defender and Malwarebytes Premium
    Other Info
    Logitech Z625 speaker system,
    Logitech BRIO 4K Pro webcam,
    HP Color LaserJet Pro MFP M477fdn,
    APC SMART-UPS RT 1000 XL - SURT1000XLI,
    Galaxy S23 Plus phone
  • Operating System
    Windows 11 Pro
    Computer type
    Laptop
    Manufacturer/Model
    HP Spectre x360 2in1 14-eu0098nr (2024)
    CPU
    Intel Core Ultra 7 155H 4.8 GHz
    Memory
    16 GB LPDDR5x-7467 MHz
    Graphics card(s)
    Integrated Intel Arc
    Sound Card
    Poly Studio
    Monitor(s) Displays
    14" 2.8K OLED multitouch
    Screen Resolution
    2880 x 1800
    Hard Drives
    2 TB PCIe NVMe M.2 SSD
    Internet Speed
    Intel Wi-Fi 7 BE200 (2x2) and Bluetooth 5.4
    Browser
    Chrome and Edge
    Antivirus
    Windows Defender and Malwarebytes Premium

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System One System Two

  • OS
    11 Home
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    Laptop
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    Asus TUF Gaming F16 (2024)
    CPU
    i7 13650HX
    Memory
    16GB DDR5
    Graphics Card(s)
    GeForce RTX 4060 Mobile
    Sound Card
    Eastern Electric MiniMax DAC Supreme; Emotiva UMC-200; Astell & Kern AK240
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    Sony Bravia XR-55X90J
    Screen Resolution
    3840×2160
    Hard Drives
    512GB SSD internal
    37TB external
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    Li-ion
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    2× Arc Flow Fans, 4× exhaust vents, 5× heatpipes
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    Logitech K800
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    Logitech G402
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    20Mbit/s up, 250Mbit/s down
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    FF
  • Operating System
    11 Home
    Computer type
    Laptop
    Manufacturer/Model
    Medion S15450
    CPU
    i5 1135G7
    Memory
    16GB DDR4
    Graphics card(s)
    Intel Iris Xe
    Sound Card
    Eastern Electric MiniMax DAC Supreme; Emotiva UMC-200; Astell & Kern AK240
    Monitor(s) Displays
    Sony Bravia XR-55X90J
    Screen Resolution
    3840×2160
    Hard Drives
    2TB SSD internal
    37TB external
    PSU
    Li-ion
    Mouse
    Logitech G402
    Keyboard
    Logitech K800
    Internet Speed
    20Mbit/s up, 250Mbit/s down
    Browser
    FF
As a test, see how S0 does ... That's what usually uses the most power during S0.
Power consumption in sleep


1 I carried out tests of power consumption during S0 Modern standby.
- I chose to run the tests on battery power because it was easy to calculate the energy consumed without additional measuring equipment.
- In each test, I checked that S0 Modern standby was used by checking relevant entries in Event viewer. The Custom view required happens to be the one I used as my example in my ditty - Import Custom view - #4 - TenForums
- I also burrowed down into my notes and found records of corresponding older power consumption tests during sleep, both S0 Modern standby and proper S3 Sleep.
- In the tests, I used HP's Envy 17-cr0001na 17inch touchscreen computer and a Chuwi Hi10 Pro 10inch touchscreen tablet-with integrated-keyboard [that looks like a very small laptop].


2 Test procedure
- I ran a [PowerCfg] Battery report to get the latest Last full charge energy level, which it presents in mWHrs.
- I read the SysTray [Notn area] Power icon indicator’s estimation of battery power remaining.
- I set the computer up for S0 Modern standby, removed external power, left it alone for a while [mostly 5-10 hours] then read the SysTray [Notn area] Power icon indicator’s estimation of battery power remaining.
- I then used the change in the indicator’s estimated charge level together with the Last full charge energy level & the duration of each trial to present the power consumed in sleep.
- I have presented my results in the awkward-looking units WHrs/Hr i.e. the energy lost over time. This awkwardness is, I think, useful because it can be readily related to the energy level reported in the battery report.
- I attempted to account for errors to some extent by calculating the effect of a possible 3% margin of error in the SysTray [Notn area] Power icon indicator’s estimation of battery power remaining. This 3% level was discussed but by no means proven in Window keeps waking up laptop from Modern Standby - TenForums


3 Results

Power consumption results.png


3.1 The power consumed in S0 Modern standby is no more than that consumed in S3 Sleep.
- The power consumed in S0 Modern standby was less than 2WHrs/Hr.
- My earlier tests in earlier computers showed that the power consumed in S3 Sleep was less than 2WHrs/Hr.

3.2 There is no particular difference in the [idle] power consumption seen in the Connected & Disconnected states once the extent of possible margins of error is considered.
- Differences would be seen in a more sophisticated test that included network activity, such as email or WU activity, during S0 Modern standby.
[This para was edited to improve clarity on 31/7/23.]

3.3 There is a large difference between the power consumed when the computer is deliberately put into S0 Modern standby compared to when Power options initiates S0 Modern standby by turning off the display.
- No distinction is apparent in Event viewer, they are both simply described as transitions into S0 Modern standby.
- MS articles do describe S0 Modern standby as having phases. I have skimmed some of them again since conducting these tests but I haven’t found anything that would have allowed me to predict the difference in test results. I'd have to delve into PowerCfg /SleepStudy & PowerCfg /BatteryReport reports to learn more about this.
- The difference prompted me to conduct some tests of corresponding behavioural differences and I’ve reported these in a separate post [below].


4 Conclusions

Contrary to my expectations, S0 Modern standby consumes as little energy as S3 Sleep so worries about it running down the battery are unfounded.

It’s long been my habit to have three ‘power schemes’ -
- “Balanced” for normal working - Display off after 2 mins, Sleep after Never, Hibernate after Never. I manually S3 Sleep it if I am going to stop using it for a while.​
- “Power saver” for playing radio comedy recordings as I drift off to sleep - Display off after 1 min, Sleep after 1 min, Hibernate after never.​
WMP v12 lets*** the display go off after 1 min but waits until the Playlist completes before counting down to the sleep after 1 min; this lets me use it and not worry it trying to stay on all night.
[*** WMP, Options, Player, clear checkbox for Allow screensaver …]
- “BalancedOn” for playing video recordings on my TV - Display off Never, Sleep after Never, Hibernate after Never.​
S0 Modern standby lets me do all these things just as well as S3 Sleep does and would allow me to automate sleeping it if I am going to stop using it for a while.



Denis
 
Last edited:

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    Windows 11 Home x64 Version 23H2 Build 22631.3447
As a test, see how S0 does ... That's what usually uses the most power during S0.

Running scripts during S0 Modern standby


1 Having seen the difference in power consumption in S0 Modern standby brought about by the method used to initiate it, I wondered if there would be differences in the ability to run scripts & to use Task scheduler to run scripts.

2 I put together a batch [& vbs] script that had multiple outputs of different types:
2.1 Appending %Date% %Time% to a log file twice a minute for four minutes, then​
2.2 Waking up the display using a method that I habitually use on my S3 Sleep-only computer, then​
2.3 Turning on CapsLock in order to get an externally-apparent indicator that the script had run, then​
2.4 Getting the computer to speak as an additional externally-apparent indicator that the script had run.​
I have attached the batch script file purely for information. There’s nothing special about it.
3 I ran the script under different conditions, different S0 Modern standby ‘phases’. I also made Task scheduler run the script in the same conditions to see if there was any difference.
4 I ran the script on HP’s Envy 17-cr0001na 17inch touchscreen computer and on a Chuwi Hi10 Pro 10inch touchscreen tablet-with integrated-keyboard [that looks like a very small laptop].


Results

Note that the script takes just over four minutes to complete.

Script results.png


The script ran and it completed correctly if it was
- Initiated by Power options - Turn off the display after …, and
- It ran to completion within the time period before Power options - Sleep after
except for the 9 hours test on the Chuwi.
- Other incidents with the Chuwi have shown that there are inaccessible Uefi settings that affect its behaviour. The 9 hour test results for the Chuwi might well be another case of that but I cannot know for sure.
[Added later - I have since been able to repeat test 7 on the Chuwi and it works. So I can now use Task scheduler successfully on both my S0 Modern standby devices.]​


Conclusion

It is possible to run scripts manually & to use Task scheduler to run scripts on a proper computer, but not necessarily on a tablet, that has S0 Modern standby.

My current main computer [S3 Sleep only] lets me set up a WMP playlist so that Task scheduler wakes me up with Louis Armstrong's On the sunny side of the street. I now expect a future S0 Modern standby replacement to be able to do the same.



Denis
 

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  • S0 Batch tester - posted.bat
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Last edited:

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    Windows 11 Home x64 Version 23H2 Build 22631.3447
@Try3

One good thing about having network connectivity enabled is the ability to automatically keep your device updated via Windows Update and/or run background tasks while in S0.

Of course, some may not want this if they keep their device in a backpack where it may get hot.
 

My Computers

System One System Two

  • OS
    Windows 11 Pro for Workstations
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop
    Manufacturer/Model
    Custom self build
    CPU
    Intel i7-8700K 5 GHz
    Motherboard
    ASUS ROG Maximus XI Formula Z390
    Memory
    64 GB (4x16GB) G.SKILL TridentZ RGB DDR4 3600 MHz (F4-3600C18D-32GTZR)
    Graphics Card(s)
    ASUS ROG-STRIX-GTX1080TI-O11G-GAMING (11GB GDDR5X)
    Sound Card
    Integrated Digital Audio (S/PDIF)
    Monitor(s) Displays
    2 x Samsung Odyssey G75 27"
    Screen Resolution
    2560x1440
    Hard Drives
    1TB Samsung 990 PRO M.2,
    4TB Samsung 990 PRO M.2,
    8TB WD MyCloudEX2Ultra NAS
    PSU
    Seasonic Prime Titanium 850W
    Case
    Thermaltake Core P3 wall mounted
    Cooling
    Corsair Hydro H115i
    Keyboard
    Logitech wireless K800
    Mouse
    Logitech MX Master 3
    Internet Speed
    1 Gbps Download and 35 Mbps Upload
    Browser
    Google Chrome
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    Microsoft Defender and Malwarebytes Premium
    Other Info
    Logitech Z625 speaker system,
    Logitech BRIO 4K Pro webcam,
    HP Color LaserJet Pro MFP M477fdn,
    APC SMART-UPS RT 1000 XL - SURT1000XLI,
    Galaxy S23 Plus phone
  • Operating System
    Windows 11 Pro
    Computer type
    Laptop
    Manufacturer/Model
    HP Spectre x360 2in1 14-eu0098nr (2024)
    CPU
    Intel Core Ultra 7 155H 4.8 GHz
    Memory
    16 GB LPDDR5x-7467 MHz
    Graphics card(s)
    Integrated Intel Arc
    Sound Card
    Poly Studio
    Monitor(s) Displays
    14" 2.8K OLED multitouch
    Screen Resolution
    2880 x 1800
    Hard Drives
    2 TB PCIe NVMe M.2 SSD
    Internet Speed
    Intel Wi-Fi 7 BE200 (2x2) and Bluetooth 5.4
    Browser
    Chrome and Edge
    Antivirus
    Windows Defender and Malwarebytes Premium
I wonder if this has something to do with S0 or S3
Run this command [in PS or Cmd parts of the Terminal, it does not matter] to see what power-sleep states you have available.
PowerCfg -a


Denis
 
Last edited:

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    Windows 11 Home x64 Version 23H2 Build 22631.3447
The problem I had with Modern Standby S0 was that I could not schedule backups to run at say 3am. After browsing many threads I found:
1. Jim Hoyle is correct. Wake on LAN is not supported by Modern Standby. The reason is that the computer is not "technically" asleep under Modern Standby, so attempting to wake it is futile. The good news is you don't need to wake it.
2. I read that scheduled tasks will not run if their creator is logged on. I read suggestions about creating tasks under a different user name to get around this.

Rather than logging on under different user names, I thought it would be simpler to logoff at say 2:58am to let backups work at 3am. I tried to schedule a logoff at 2:58am using Windows Task Scheduler with no success. I found an app Wise Auto Shutdown that allowed me to schedule a log off at 2:58am. Then my backup task for Active Backup for Business (ABB) ran at 3am (ABB has its own scheduler which I set for 3am). I would hope this will work for other apps which include schedulers and for Windows Task Scheduler running other tasks. I have not tried these.

I hope this helps somebody.
 

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    Windows 11 Home 22H2
    Computer type
    Laptop
    Manufacturer/Model
    Dell XPS 13 9310
    CPU
    11th Gen Intel(R) Core(TM) i7-1185G7 @ 3.00GHz
    Memory
    16 GB
    Internet Speed
    60 download, 10 upload
    Browser
    Chrome
Last edited:

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    Windows 11 Home x64 Version 23H2 Build 22631.3447
I'm realizing how different all these machines are with Standby. On a new Dell system, when the machine enters Standby all networking is disabled, by policy. ( Output of powercfg /a command ). ( Yes it can be enable, Shawn's tutorial.)

I set my screen to shut off after three minutes and set sleep to never. My backup was schedule to start at least 30 minutes after screen shutoff. The networked backups ran successful and should not have if S0 was in invoke. There shouldn't have been a network connection by policy. So at least on this Dell the screen being shutoff does not invoke Standby.

Of note, in this Dell in the Power section of the BIOS there is a switch to prevent the OS from using S3. Out of the box this is disabled so I assume following this tutorial will allow S3 to be enabled.

I also noticed in Group Policies there are two policies, one for battery and one for plugged in, that enable S1-S3. gpedit > Computer Configuration > Administrative Templates > System > Power Management > Sleep.

I wonder how these policies differ from the tutorial commands / registry edits. Would the policies provide more functionality or do the commands / registry edits indirectly enable these policies?

From reading I saw a post that the Windows Clock app can stir a machine in S0 state. I wonder why the makers of backup software with their own schedulers can't copy. One individual was setting alarms in the clock to "awaken" machine and then used this opportunity to run scheduled tasks. Inventive solution, one I did not test.
 

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    Windows 11 Pro x64 Version V22H2
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop
    Manufacturer/Model
    Custom
    CPU
    i7-8700K
    Motherboard
    Asus Maximus X Code - Z370
    Memory
    G.Skill Trident Z 3200MHz F4-3200C16D-16GTZ (2) 32GB
    Graphics Card(s)
    Intel UHD Graphics 630
    Sound Card
    Integrated ROG SupremeFX
    Monitor(s) Displays
    Asus VP279 27", Samsung BX2431 24"
    Screen Resolution
    1920 x 1080
    Hard Drives
    Samsung M.2 NVMe 960 EVO 500GB Boot,
    Samsung 840 EVO 250GB (System Copy Drive),
    Samsung 860 EVO 1TB (Primary Data Drive),
    WD Black 500GB (Data Copy Drive)
    ICY Dock 5.25 2.5/3.5 Bays MB971SP-B
    PSU
    Corsair RM 650i +Gold
    Case
    Phanteks Enthroo Primo
    Cooling
    Corsair Hydro H150i, 360mm Rad & Five Corsair 140mm Pro ML Case Fans
    Keyboard
    das Keyboard MX Brown Mechanical Switches Model DASKMKPROSIL-3G7-r1.0
    Mouse
    Logitech MX Master 3 Wireless & Bluetooth
    Internet Speed
    %00Mb +
    Browser
    Chrome (Pri), Firefox (Sec)
    Antivirus
    Malwarebytes Premium, SuperAntiSpyware Pro (Licensed)
    Other Info
    Microsoft LifeCam HD,
    APC Back-UPS Pro 1500,
    Macrium (Licensed),
    Office 365,
    Wise Disk Cleaner,
    Crystal Disk Info,
    Screenpresso (Licensed),
    AnyDesk (Licensed),
Denis,
Thanks for your reply above. I found that my suggestion of using Wise Auto Shutdown to log off at 2:58 am is not reliable - it did not work the next time I tried it. So I used your "set Power options to Sleep after - Never", set screen saver to wait 10 minutes, and scheduled backups for 10pm, and used Wise Auto Shutdown to shutdown at 10:30pm. Happy Days! Thanks again Denis.
 

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    Windows 11 Home 22H2
    Computer type
    Laptop
    Manufacturer/Model
    Dell XPS 13 9310
    CPU
    11th Gen Intel(R) Core(TM) i7-1185G7 @ 3.00GHz
    Memory
    16 GB
    Internet Speed
    60 download, 10 upload
    Browser
    Chrome
I'm realizing how different all these machines are with Standby. On a new Dell system, when the machine enters Standby all networking is disabled, by policy. ( Output of powercfg /a command ). ( Yes it can be enable, Shawn's tutorial.)

I set my screen to shut off after three minutes and set sleep to never. My backup was schedule to start at least 30 minutes after screen shutoff. The networked backups ran successful and should not have if S0 was in invoke. There shouldn't have been a network connection by policy. So at least on this Dell the screen being shutoff does not invoke Standby.

Of note, in this Dell in the Power section of the BIOS there is a switch to prevent the OS from using S3. Out of the box this is disabled so I assume following this tutorial will allow S3 to be enabled.

I also noticed in Group Policies there are two policies, one for battery and one for plugged in, that enable S1-S3. gpedit > Computer Configuration > Administrative Templates > System > Power Management > Sleep.

I wonder how these policies differ from the tutorial commands / registry edits. Would the policies provide more functionality or do the commands / registry edits indirectly enable these policies?

From reading I saw a post that the Windows Clock app can stir a machine in S0 state. I wonder why the makers of backup software with their own schedulers can't copy. One individual was setting alarms in the clock to "awaken" machine and then used this opportunity to run scheduled tasks. Inventive solution, one I did not test.
I will just repeat myself saying. Dell uses one policy. One policy ONLY. It is the policy of the Devil.
 

My Computers

System One System Two

  • OS
    11 Home
    Computer type
    Laptop
    Manufacturer/Model
    Asus TUF Gaming F16 (2024)
    CPU
    i7 13650HX
    Memory
    16GB DDR5
    Graphics Card(s)
    GeForce RTX 4060 Mobile
    Sound Card
    Eastern Electric MiniMax DAC Supreme; Emotiva UMC-200; Astell & Kern AK240
    Monitor(s) Displays
    Sony Bravia XR-55X90J
    Screen Resolution
    3840×2160
    Hard Drives
    512GB SSD internal
    37TB external
    PSU
    Li-ion
    Cooling
    2× Arc Flow Fans, 4× exhaust vents, 5× heatpipes
    Keyboard
    Logitech K800
    Mouse
    Logitech G402
    Internet Speed
    20Mbit/s up, 250Mbit/s down
    Browser
    FF
  • Operating System
    11 Home
    Computer type
    Laptop
    Manufacturer/Model
    Medion S15450
    CPU
    i5 1135G7
    Memory
    16GB DDR4
    Graphics card(s)
    Intel Iris Xe
    Sound Card
    Eastern Electric MiniMax DAC Supreme; Emotiva UMC-200; Astell & Kern AK240
    Monitor(s) Displays
    Sony Bravia XR-55X90J
    Screen Resolution
    3840×2160
    Hard Drives
    2TB SSD internal
    37TB external
    PSU
    Li-ion
    Mouse
    Logitech G402
    Keyboard
    Logitech K800
    Internet Speed
    20Mbit/s up, 250Mbit/s down
    Browser
    FF
I wonder how these policies differ from the tutorial commands / registry edits. Would the policies provide more functionality or do the commands / registry edits indirectly enable these policies?
Maybe @Brink can give you a direct answer to that. IMO I have found his registry edits accomplish the same function as the GPO policies. I have noticed in a few of his tutorials he differentiates the instances where any particular change does not apply to a HOME user and in others he states HOME or PRO can use the regedit. Personally, I manage everything I can using GPO. Of course, HOME users do not have this option and have to resort to the regedit method.
 

My Computers

System One System Two

  • OS
    Windows 11 Pro 23H2 22631.3593
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop
    Manufacturer/Model
    Dell Optiplex 7080
    CPU
    i9-10900 10 core 20 threads
    Motherboard
    DELL 0J37VM
    Memory
    32 gb
    Graphics Card(s)
    none-Intel UHD Graphics 630
    Sound Card
    Integrated Realtek
    Monitor(s) Displays
    Benq 27
    Screen Resolution
    2560x1440
    Hard Drives
    1tb Solidigm m.2 +256gb ssd+512 gb usb m.2 sata
    PSU
    500w
    Case
    MT
    Cooling
    Dell Premium
    Keyboard
    Logitech wired
    Mouse
    Logitech wireless
    Internet Speed
    so slow I'm too embarrassed to tell
    Browser
    Firefox
    Antivirus
    Defender+MWB Premium
  • Operating System
    Windows 10 Pro 22H2 19045.3930
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop
    Manufacturer/Model
    Dell Optiplex 9020
    CPU
    i7-4770
    Memory
    24 gb
    Monitor(s) Displays
    Benq 27
    Screen Resolution
    2560x1440
    Hard Drives
    256 gb Toshiba BG4 M.2 NVE SSB and 1 tb hdd
    PSU
    500w
    Case
    MT
    Cooling
    Dell factory
    Mouse
    Logitech wireless
    Keyboard
    Logitech wired
    Internet Speed
    still not telling
    Browser
    Firefox
    Antivirus
    Defender+MWB Premium
I also noticed in Group Policies there are two policies, one for battery and one for plugged in, that enable S1-S3. gpedit > Computer Configuration > Administrative Templates > System > Power Management > Sleep.

I wonder how these policies differ from the tutorial commands / registry edits. Would the policies provide more functionality or do the commands / registry edits indirectly enable these policies?

Hello Ken, :alien:

Those are some old legacy policies from Vista that can be used to disable S1-S3. They wouldn't apply for modern standby.

As @glasskuter posted above, you can use Local Group Policy Editor or Registry Editor to configure policies. It just comes down to if you have the Home or Pro edition installed and which method you prefer. Otherwise, they both do the same.
 

My Computers

System One System Two

  • OS
    Windows 11 Pro for Workstations
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop
    Manufacturer/Model
    Custom self build
    CPU
    Intel i7-8700K 5 GHz
    Motherboard
    ASUS ROG Maximus XI Formula Z390
    Memory
    64 GB (4x16GB) G.SKILL TridentZ RGB DDR4 3600 MHz (F4-3600C18D-32GTZR)
    Graphics Card(s)
    ASUS ROG-STRIX-GTX1080TI-O11G-GAMING (11GB GDDR5X)
    Sound Card
    Integrated Digital Audio (S/PDIF)
    Monitor(s) Displays
    2 x Samsung Odyssey G75 27"
    Screen Resolution
    2560x1440
    Hard Drives
    1TB Samsung 990 PRO M.2,
    4TB Samsung 990 PRO M.2,
    8TB WD MyCloudEX2Ultra NAS
    PSU
    Seasonic Prime Titanium 850W
    Case
    Thermaltake Core P3 wall mounted
    Cooling
    Corsair Hydro H115i
    Keyboard
    Logitech wireless K800
    Mouse
    Logitech MX Master 3
    Internet Speed
    1 Gbps Download and 35 Mbps Upload
    Browser
    Google Chrome
    Antivirus
    Microsoft Defender and Malwarebytes Premium
    Other Info
    Logitech Z625 speaker system,
    Logitech BRIO 4K Pro webcam,
    HP Color LaserJet Pro MFP M477fdn,
    APC SMART-UPS RT 1000 XL - SURT1000XLI,
    Galaxy S23 Plus phone
  • Operating System
    Windows 11 Pro
    Computer type
    Laptop
    Manufacturer/Model
    HP Spectre x360 2in1 14-eu0098nr (2024)
    CPU
    Intel Core Ultra 7 155H 4.8 GHz
    Memory
    16 GB LPDDR5x-7467 MHz
    Graphics card(s)
    Integrated Intel Arc
    Sound Card
    Poly Studio
    Monitor(s) Displays
    14" 2.8K OLED multitouch
    Screen Resolution
    2880 x 1800
    Hard Drives
    2 TB PCIe NVMe M.2 SSD
    Internet Speed
    Intel Wi-Fi 7 BE200 (2x2) and Bluetooth 5.4
    Browser
    Chrome and Edge
    Antivirus
    Windows Defender and Malwarebytes Premium
Modern standby really is the devil as @hdmi said, but the blame for it does not fall on Dell, but Microsoft. It is their love child and implementation. All the OEMs followed like sheep.
 

My Computers

System One System Two

  • OS
    Windows 11 Pro 23H2 22631.3593
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop
    Manufacturer/Model
    Dell Optiplex 7080
    CPU
    i9-10900 10 core 20 threads
    Motherboard
    DELL 0J37VM
    Memory
    32 gb
    Graphics Card(s)
    none-Intel UHD Graphics 630
    Sound Card
    Integrated Realtek
    Monitor(s) Displays
    Benq 27
    Screen Resolution
    2560x1440
    Hard Drives
    1tb Solidigm m.2 +256gb ssd+512 gb usb m.2 sata
    PSU
    500w
    Case
    MT
    Cooling
    Dell Premium
    Keyboard
    Logitech wired
    Mouse
    Logitech wireless
    Internet Speed
    so slow I'm too embarrassed to tell
    Browser
    Firefox
    Antivirus
    Defender+MWB Premium
  • Operating System
    Windows 10 Pro 22H2 19045.3930
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop
    Manufacturer/Model
    Dell Optiplex 9020
    CPU
    i7-4770
    Memory
    24 gb
    Monitor(s) Displays
    Benq 27
    Screen Resolution
    2560x1440
    Hard Drives
    256 gb Toshiba BG4 M.2 NVE SSB and 1 tb hdd
    PSU
    500w
    Case
    MT
    Cooling
    Dell factory
    Mouse
    Logitech wireless
    Keyboard
    Logitech wired
    Internet Speed
    still not telling
    Browser
    Firefox
    Antivirus
    Defender+MWB Premium
Thanks everyone. The device I'm working on was ordered with Pro.

All totally ridiculous, if Modern Standby has been around in some form since Win 8, as we enter Win 11, the industry should have been able to write a standard that allows tasks like AV and backups to run.

Again I appear to lucky in that Dell does not enforce S0 in the BIOS, from what I read not everyone is so fortunate.

The forum as always provides an excellent resource, thank you.

As I suggest laptops for clients I will be going in with my eyes opened a little wider.
 

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    Windows 11 Pro x64 Version V22H2
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop
    Manufacturer/Model
    Custom
    CPU
    i7-8700K
    Motherboard
    Asus Maximus X Code - Z370
    Memory
    G.Skill Trident Z 3200MHz F4-3200C16D-16GTZ (2) 32GB
    Graphics Card(s)
    Intel UHD Graphics 630
    Sound Card
    Integrated ROG SupremeFX
    Monitor(s) Displays
    Asus VP279 27", Samsung BX2431 24"
    Screen Resolution
    1920 x 1080
    Hard Drives
    Samsung M.2 NVMe 960 EVO 500GB Boot,
    Samsung 840 EVO 250GB (System Copy Drive),
    Samsung 860 EVO 1TB (Primary Data Drive),
    WD Black 500GB (Data Copy Drive)
    ICY Dock 5.25 2.5/3.5 Bays MB971SP-B
    PSU
    Corsair RM 650i +Gold
    Case
    Phanteks Enthroo Primo
    Cooling
    Corsair Hydro H150i, 360mm Rad & Five Corsair 140mm Pro ML Case Fans
    Keyboard
    das Keyboard MX Brown Mechanical Switches Model DASKMKPROSIL-3G7-r1.0
    Mouse
    Logitech MX Master 3 Wireless & Bluetooth
    Internet Speed
    %00Mb +
    Browser
    Chrome (Pri), Firefox (Sec)
    Antivirus
    Malwarebytes Premium, SuperAntiSpyware Pro (Licensed)
    Other Info
    Microsoft LifeCam HD,
    APC Back-UPS Pro 1500,
    Macrium (Licensed),
    Office 365,
    Wise Disk Cleaner,
    Crystal Disk Info,
    Screenpresso (Licensed),
    AnyDesk (Licensed),
, but the blame for it does not fall on Dell, but Microsoft.
That's only partially true IMO. The ability to put a laptop in S3 Standby, successfully and without problems like crashing immediately upon trying to put it in S3 Standby after having disabled Modern Standby via the Windows registry is system-specific. The same also applies to lacking the possibilty to disable Modern Standby altogether (i.e. due to this same Windows registry setting simply getting ignored by the BIOS) in such a way that either modding the BIOS or using rEFInd as a means to override the settings that BIOS loads into the DSDT before it continues to boot the OS is your only way to jailbreak from it. Because, on my laptop this Windows registry setting is working absolutely fine, like, easy peasy lemon squeezy, and that sure makes me one very happy camper. :D You don't have to google for very long to arrive at the conclusion that those specific laptop users who could not say the same were primarily users who bought from Dell. They actually even went as far as to delete a few posts from their community forum to try and cover this up. LOL
 

My Computers

System One System Two

  • OS
    11 Home
    Computer type
    Laptop
    Manufacturer/Model
    Asus TUF Gaming F16 (2024)
    CPU
    i7 13650HX
    Memory
    16GB DDR5
    Graphics Card(s)
    GeForce RTX 4060 Mobile
    Sound Card
    Eastern Electric MiniMax DAC Supreme; Emotiva UMC-200; Astell & Kern AK240
    Monitor(s) Displays
    Sony Bravia XR-55X90J
    Screen Resolution
    3840×2160
    Hard Drives
    512GB SSD internal
    37TB external
    PSU
    Li-ion
    Cooling
    2× Arc Flow Fans, 4× exhaust vents, 5× heatpipes
    Keyboard
    Logitech K800
    Mouse
    Logitech G402
    Internet Speed
    20Mbit/s up, 250Mbit/s down
    Browser
    FF
  • Operating System
    11 Home
    Computer type
    Laptop
    Manufacturer/Model
    Medion S15450
    CPU
    i5 1135G7
    Memory
    16GB DDR4
    Graphics card(s)
    Intel Iris Xe
    Sound Card
    Eastern Electric MiniMax DAC Supreme; Emotiva UMC-200; Astell & Kern AK240
    Monitor(s) Displays
    Sony Bravia XR-55X90J
    Screen Resolution
    3840×2160
    Hard Drives
    2TB SSD internal
    37TB external
    PSU
    Li-ion
    Mouse
    Logitech G402
    Keyboard
    Logitech K800
    Internet Speed
    20Mbit/s up, 250Mbit/s down
    Browser
    FF
Sorry hdmi. If I'm reading your post correctly it is Dell users that have an issue with enabling S3?

This laptop has a specific BIOS setting that can be enabled to ignore S3 but as shipped it is disabled. I assume that means it will allow S3 to be enabled. This is a Dell XPS 9720, brand new.
 

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    Windows 11 Pro x64 Version V22H2
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop
    Manufacturer/Model
    Custom
    CPU
    i7-8700K
    Motherboard
    Asus Maximus X Code - Z370
    Memory
    G.Skill Trident Z 3200MHz F4-3200C16D-16GTZ (2) 32GB
    Graphics Card(s)
    Intel UHD Graphics 630
    Sound Card
    Integrated ROG SupremeFX
    Monitor(s) Displays
    Asus VP279 27", Samsung BX2431 24"
    Screen Resolution
    1920 x 1080
    Hard Drives
    Samsung M.2 NVMe 960 EVO 500GB Boot,
    Samsung 840 EVO 250GB (System Copy Drive),
    Samsung 860 EVO 1TB (Primary Data Drive),
    WD Black 500GB (Data Copy Drive)
    ICY Dock 5.25 2.5/3.5 Bays MB971SP-B
    PSU
    Corsair RM 650i +Gold
    Case
    Phanteks Enthroo Primo
    Cooling
    Corsair Hydro H150i, 360mm Rad & Five Corsair 140mm Pro ML Case Fans
    Keyboard
    das Keyboard MX Brown Mechanical Switches Model DASKMKPROSIL-3G7-r1.0
    Mouse
    Logitech MX Master 3 Wireless & Bluetooth
    Internet Speed
    %00Mb +
    Browser
    Chrome (Pri), Firefox (Sec)
    Antivirus
    Malwarebytes Premium, SuperAntiSpyware Pro (Licensed)
    Other Info
    Microsoft LifeCam HD,
    APC Back-UPS Pro 1500,
    Macrium (Licensed),
    Office 365,
    Wise Disk Cleaner,
    Crystal Disk Info,
    Screenpresso (Licensed),
    AnyDesk (Licensed),

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