How to Upgrade Win 10 to Win 11 after Motherboard Upgrade

spapakons

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Athens
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Windows 11 Pro 21H2 64-bit (build 22000.282)
They said so to discourage us install Windows 11 on unsupported systems, that's their goal. Doing that is another story remaining to be seen. I will risk it.
 

My Computers

System One System Two

  • OS
    Windows 11 Pro 21H2 64-bit (build 22000.282)
    Computer type
    Laptop
    Manufacturer/Model
    Acer Extensa 5630EZ
    CPU
    Mobile DualCore Intel Core 2 Duo T7250, 2000 MHz
    Motherboard
    Acer Extensa 5630
    Memory
    4GB
    Graphics Card(s)
    Mobile Intel(R) GMA 4500M (Mobile 4 series)
    Sound Card
    Realtek ALC268 @ Intel 82801IB ICH9 - High Definition Audio Controller
    Monitor(s) Displays
    1
    Screen Resolution
    1280x800
    Hard Drives
    Samsung SSD 850 EVO 250GB SATA Device (250 GB, SATA-III)
    Internet Speed
    VDSL 50 Mbps
    Browser
    MICROSOFT EDGE
    Antivirus
    WINDOWS DEFENDER
  • Operating System
    Windows 11 Pro v21H2 (build 22000.438)
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop
    Manufacturer/Model
    Custom-built PC
    CPU
    Intel Core-i7 3770 3.40GHz s1155 (3rd generation)
    Motherboard
    Asus P8H61 s1155 ATX
    Memory
    2x Kingston Hyper-X Blu 8GB DDR3-1600
    Graphics card(s)
    Asus GT620-1GD3 (nVidia GeForce GT 620 1GB DDR3)
    Sound Card
    Realtek HD audio (ALC887)
    Monitor(s) Displays
    Sony Bravia KDL-19L4000 19" LCD TV via VGA
    Screen Resolution
    1440x900 32-bit 60Hz
    Hard Drives
    Patriot Burst Elite 480GB SSD as system disk, Western Digital Caviar Purple 4TB SATA III (WD40PURZ) as second
    PSU
    Thermaltake Litepower RGB 550W Full Wired
    Case
    SUPERCASE MIDI-TOWER
    Cooling
    Stock Intel CPU Fan, 1x 8cm fan at the back
    Mouse
    Sunnyline OptiEye PS/2
    Keyboard
    Mitsumi 101-key PS/2
    Internet Speed
    100Mbps
    Browser
    Microsoft Edge, Mozilla Firefox
    Antivirus
    Microsoft Windows Defender
    Other Info
    Legacy BIOS (MBR) installation, no TPM, no Secure Boot, WDDM 2.3 graphics drivers, WEI score 5.1

Dch48

Well-known member
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227
OS
Windows 11 Home
They said so to discourage us install Windows 11 on unsupported systems, that's their goal. Doing that is another story remaining to be seen. I will risk it.
To discourage you for your own good, not theirs. They want to make Windows more secure and it's going to take better hardware to do that.
 

My Computers

System One System Two

  • OS
    Windows 11 Home
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop
    Manufacturer/Model
    Custom built
    CPU
    AMD Ryzen 5 5600X
    Motherboard
    MSI B550-A Pro
    Memory
    16 GB DDR4-3200
    Graphics Card(s)
    PowerColor Red Devil Radeon RX 6600XT with 8GB GDDR6
    Sound Card
    Realtek integrated
    Monitor(s) Displays
    Acer Nitro 24" RG241Y
    Screen Resolution
    1920 X 1080
    Hard Drives
    Samsung 860 QVO 1 TB SATA SSD
    Seagate Barracuda 1 TB HDD
    PSU
    LEPA B650 650 watt
    Case
    Enermax Coenus
    Cooling
    Cooler Master Hyper T4 air
    Keyboard
    CM Storm Devastator
    Mouse
    E-Blue Cobra Jr.
    Internet Speed
    100mbs
    Browser
    Microsoft Edge Chromium
    Antivirus
    Microsoft Defender
  • Operating System
    Windows 10 Home
    Computer type
    Laptop
    Manufacturer/Model
    Acer Nitro 5 (AN515-42)
    CPU
    AMD Ryzen 5 2500U
    Motherboard
    Acer/ Freed_RRS
    Memory
    16 GB DDR4-2400
    Graphics card(s)
    Integrated Radeon Vega 8 and discrete Radeon RX 560X with 4GB GDDR5
    Sound Card
    Integrated Realtek
    Monitor(s) Displays
    Laptop screen 15.6" IPS
    Screen Resolution
    1920 X 1080
    Hard Drives
    1TB Crucial MX-500 SATA SSD in m.2 slot, 1TB backup SATA HDD
    PSU
    Battery power and Acer power brick/adapter
    Case
    Laptop
    Cooling
    Laptop fans
    Mouse
    Touchpad and e-Blue Cobra jr.
    Keyboard
    Built in backlit
    Internet Speed
    100mbps
    Browser
    Edge Chromium
    Antivirus
    Microsoft Defender

ish4d0w

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123
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Windows 10
... Al long as Microsoft doesn't make any major changes to Windows 11, it will remain identical to Windows 10 64-bit ... If some future build is totally different and incompatible with the CPU (using new instructions found only on newer CPUs), ...
Right. But I believe such changes are likely in the coming years.
I think that kind of change to the code is unlikely because it would be like rewriting the OS from start and would introduce major incompatibilities with existing software.
It is likely. I thought it was crazy when I first saw Windows 11's system requirements. I still think it is crazy. But I think it adds up to what they want to do next, and it is not like a major rewrite at all. It is more like, they now presume that you have the latest and greatest hardware. You can, of course, flat out lie to the installer app, and install Windows 11 anyway, but then again, I don't believe they did this only to boost hardware sales, there must be other reasons too why they made TPM mandatory, even though they probably knew very well that there are so many PCs out there without it. Almost none of the desktop PCs have it, unless they were manufactured in a few years ago, which they have to be, thanks to their other crazy requirement (8th gen Intel or new gen Ryzen)
I do have an 8th and 10th gen Intel, but I also have a 4th gen one that still works fine, and I am sad to lose upgrades at 2025 due to this. It is less than 3 years time when Windows 10's support will be cut off, and a perfectly usable system will be left vulnerable. I'll probably switch to Linux, they are not this crazy.

Let me give a few examples on what could they add or "change":


- They could enable BitLocker by default on system disks.
(It would make sense to me from a security perspective, just imagine how much it would reduce the risk of identity/data theft in case a device is stolen)

- They could seriously improve their Find My Device feature
(This feature, at the moment seems very half-baked to me. An attacker could easily just disable it by reinstalling the OS from the boot menu. But, with BitLocker enabled, perhaps restricting access to the UEFI SETUP and boot menu by default, for example locking it down with the Windows Hello PIN code, in case the owner sets it into lost mode (similar to what Apple does with the Find My Mac's lock feature, where you have to enter a pincode at boot time, or it won't boot and you can't bypass it). TPM is a great help here. No point of storing keys, and these settings on the hard disk.

- They could prevent unathorized removal of Microsoft Accounts from the computer
(Nowadays, when its stored in the OS only, you can just format the drive and the Microsoft account is gone as it is just an OS setting. However, were it to use a unique key, hardware-specific, stored in the TPM, force-read every boot time, with an encrypted hard disk, and locked UEFI menu, and even if you still managed to reinstall the OS, it would instantly sign back in to the Microsoft account as it was stored in the TPM, and possibly tying hardware IDs to this Microsoft account lock as well. This again, would seriously cripple any theft attempts I think. Much like how Apple does it. - I mean, good luck trying to remove an Apple ID without password from an unknown Mac)
Remember when Apple removed Rosetta from Mac OS X?
Yes. They kept it for almost 5 years - it appeared in the INtel version of Mac OSX 10.4 Tiger, was kept in OSX 10.5 Leopard, and OSX 10.6 Snow Leopard, which was released in 2009, supported until summer 2011. Actually that's more than 5 years.
By that time not many people were using PowerPC apps anymore, and those who did, could just stay on Snow Leopard.
Many legacy applications could not run and users were forced to upgrade all their old applications.
Actually Rosetta was kind of amazing at the time and had a good success rate. They were not forced to upgrade as Apple offered support for these OSX versions with Rosetta for about 6 years (until summer 2011) from the release of the first intel based Mac OSX edition. I would call it a day.
I don't think Microsoft wants thousands of unhappy customers, so they should avoid doing something similar, leaving Windows 11 compatible with all computers running Windows 10 64-bit, albeit if they don't meet all the requirements.
Yes you are right. However, I think they are too late to avoid it. I believe they will have much worse turnout ratio at this, than Apple did. They just have to wait a few years for the, eh, storm to hit the fan - when Windows 10 support is pulled. I don't think masses of people will flock to the stores just to get a Windows 11 certified PC, especially not with these bogus requirements. Yes, from a security perspective, they are useful and indeed can make things more secure, but the average user won't care a bit about this, they will be more annoyed how their favorite app won't run anymore. They will resist and stay on old versions, much like Windows XP was used way past its EOL date, and Windows 7 still seems very wildly deployed. (I can understand it, it was really a robust OS, Windows 10 and 11 are not even close in stability in my opinion).
Compatibility hell and fragmentation incoming. Releasing when Windows 10 support ends...
 

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System One

Dru2

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Windows 11 Pro 21H2 (22000.348)
Right. But I believe such changes are likely in the coming years.

It is more like, they now presume that you have the latest and greatest hardware.

The "latest and greatest hardware" is certainly not an i7-7800X (June 2017), an i7-8700 (Jan 2018) or an i9-9900K (Oct 2018). These are some of the processors listed here, in Microsoft's supported Windows 11 processors. And those I listed are discontinued, along with their corresponding motherboards. That's hardly "latest and greatest", and especially when you consider all the processors and motherboards released after.

And my i9 system listed in system specs is hardly latest and greatest hardware, yet it's still fully Windows 11 compatible ;)

Now if you want to argue PC's older than 5 years...yeah. Latest and greatest... no.

there must be other reasons too why they made TPM mandatory, even though they probably knew very well that there are so many PCs out there without it. Almost none of the desktop PCs have it, unless they were manufactured in a few years ago,
TPM (2.0) has been around since 2013 and have been included in the BIOS (firmware TPM aka PTT) for at least 7 years now. And pretty much every laptop manufactured around that time include TPM 2.0. Additionally, near all motherboard vendors (Asus, Gigabyte, EVGA, MSI) have had firmware TPM since at least 2015. Again, hardly new tech. In the last 3 Gigabyte boards I bought since 2017 all have firmware TPM in the UEFI Bios ;)

BTW - Trusted Platform Module (TPM) - Microsoft Research (Established: January 1, 2000)

All that said, some are "conveniently overlooking" the fact that Windows 10 is still a viable OS with 3 more years of full support. Point?... one does NOT have to / need to upgrade to Windows 11 if their machines aren't compatible. And Microsoft isn't forcing it on incompatible machines!!!

I think a bit of research (facts) rather than emotions should rule here :)
 
Last edited:

My Computers

System One System Two

  • OS
    Windows 11 Pro 21H2 (22000.348)
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop
    Manufacturer/Model
    Custom built
    CPU
    Intel i9-9900K
    Motherboard
    Gigabyte Aorus Z390 Xtreme
    Memory
    32G (4x8) DDR4 Corsair RGB Dominator Platinum (3600Mhz)
    Graphics Card(s)
    Radeon VII
    Sound Card
    Onboard (ESS Sabre HiFi using Realtek drivers)
    Monitor(s) Displays
    NEC PA242w (24 inch)
    Screen Resolution
    1920 x 1200
    Hard Drives
    5 Samsung SSD drives: 2X 970 NVME (512 & 1TB), 3X EVO SATA (2X 2TB, 1X 1TB)
    PSU
    EVGA Super Nova I000 P2 (1000 watt)
    Case
    Cooler Master H500M
    Cooling
    Corsair H115i RGB Platinum
    Keyboard
    Logitech Craft
    Mouse
    Logitech MX Master 2S
    Internet Speed
    180mb upload. 11mb Download
    Browser
    Edge Chromium
    Antivirus
    Windows Security
    Other Info
    System used for gaming, photography, audiophile media center, work.
  • Operating System
    Win 11 Pro Dev build 22454.1000
    Computer type
    Laptop
    Manufacturer/Model
    Lenovo ThinkPad Yoga X1
    CPU
    Intel i7-7600U
    Motherboard
    Intel
    Memory
    16igg
    Graphics card(s)
    Intel HD 620
    Sound Card
    Onboard
    Monitor(s) Displays
    14.0 WQHD OLED Touch
    Screen Resolution
    2560 x 1440
    Hard Drives
    1TB NVMe Drive (OEM)
    PSU
    laptop
    Case
    laptop
    Cooling
    Laptop cooling
    Mouse
    Logitech MX Anywhere 2S
    Keyboard
    Laptop
    Internet Speed
    100MB
    Browser
    Edge Chromium
    Antivirus
    Windows Security

spapakons

Well-known member
Member
Local time
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499
Location
Athens
OS
Windows 11 Pro 21H2 64-bit (build 22000.282)
When a new Windows version is released you have the feeling that your old version currently use is (or will be) outdated and you have to upgrade to the new version. I always want the latest software to extend the life of my system. Microsoft's new system requirements were not a pleasant surprise, but thankfully there is a workaround. I don't know how frequently you replace your computers in USA, but here in Greece we don't normally replace it if we can still do our job or whatever other purpose we use it for, we can still buy new peripherals and connect to or install latest software. Forcing us to upgrade, regardless that it is far from obsolete for our everyday computing, is not desirable. As long as there is a workaround and our computers remain compatible with current builds and software, I see no reason to upgrade them, let alone replace them. Security is not a reason, since we hardly need this level of security on an average system. All we need is an updated antivirus and use the internet wisely. Not click Yes on every pop-up just to get rid of it. I too never read all the messages but I click on No instead or close the pop-up window from the X button. Never click Yes. Common sense.
 

My Computers

System One System Two

  • OS
    Windows 11 Pro 21H2 64-bit (build 22000.282)
    Computer type
    Laptop
    Manufacturer/Model
    Acer Extensa 5630EZ
    CPU
    Mobile DualCore Intel Core 2 Duo T7250, 2000 MHz
    Motherboard
    Acer Extensa 5630
    Memory
    4GB
    Graphics Card(s)
    Mobile Intel(R) GMA 4500M (Mobile 4 series)
    Sound Card
    Realtek ALC268 @ Intel 82801IB ICH9 - High Definition Audio Controller
    Monitor(s) Displays
    1
    Screen Resolution
    1280x800
    Hard Drives
    Samsung SSD 850 EVO 250GB SATA Device (250 GB, SATA-III)
    Internet Speed
    VDSL 50 Mbps
    Browser
    MICROSOFT EDGE
    Antivirus
    WINDOWS DEFENDER
  • Operating System
    Windows 11 Pro v21H2 (build 22000.438)
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop
    Manufacturer/Model
    Custom-built PC
    CPU
    Intel Core-i7 3770 3.40GHz s1155 (3rd generation)
    Motherboard
    Asus P8H61 s1155 ATX
    Memory
    2x Kingston Hyper-X Blu 8GB DDR3-1600
    Graphics card(s)
    Asus GT620-1GD3 (nVidia GeForce GT 620 1GB DDR3)
    Sound Card
    Realtek HD audio (ALC887)
    Monitor(s) Displays
    Sony Bravia KDL-19L4000 19" LCD TV via VGA
    Screen Resolution
    1440x900 32-bit 60Hz
    Hard Drives
    Patriot Burst Elite 480GB SSD as system disk, Western Digital Caviar Purple 4TB SATA III (WD40PURZ) as second
    PSU
    Thermaltake Litepower RGB 550W Full Wired
    Case
    SUPERCASE MIDI-TOWER
    Cooling
    Stock Intel CPU Fan, 1x 8cm fan at the back
    Mouse
    Sunnyline OptiEye PS/2
    Keyboard
    Mitsumi 101-key PS/2
    Internet Speed
    100Mbps
    Browser
    Microsoft Edge, Mozilla Firefox
    Antivirus
    Microsoft Windows Defender
    Other Info
    Legacy BIOS (MBR) installation, no TPM, no Secure Boot, WDDM 2.3 graphics drivers, WEI score 5.1

Dru2

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Windows 11 Pro 21H2 (22000.348)
When a new Windows version is released you have the feeling that your old version currently use is (or will be) outdated and you have to upgrade to the new version.

Yes, I understand that feeling, and why I did upgrade to Windows 11, but that was by choice, not "force". Not "force" because...

1) For the first time Microsoft now has two fully functional consumer Windows OS out at the same time - Windows 10 & Windows 11
2) Windows 10 is still viable, there's no need to rush into Windows 11, especially if your hardware doesn't support it.

Again, if your current hardware doesn't support Windows 11, stick to Windows 10 until you get the hardware for 11. There is no rush. And it's not like Windows 11 is that far superior to Windows 10 as to make 10 useless or even a security risk ;)
 

My Computers

System One System Two

  • OS
    Windows 11 Pro 21H2 (22000.348)
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop
    Manufacturer/Model
    Custom built
    CPU
    Intel i9-9900K
    Motherboard
    Gigabyte Aorus Z390 Xtreme
    Memory
    32G (4x8) DDR4 Corsair RGB Dominator Platinum (3600Mhz)
    Graphics Card(s)
    Radeon VII
    Sound Card
    Onboard (ESS Sabre HiFi using Realtek drivers)
    Monitor(s) Displays
    NEC PA242w (24 inch)
    Screen Resolution
    1920 x 1200
    Hard Drives
    5 Samsung SSD drives: 2X 970 NVME (512 & 1TB), 3X EVO SATA (2X 2TB, 1X 1TB)
    PSU
    EVGA Super Nova I000 P2 (1000 watt)
    Case
    Cooler Master H500M
    Cooling
    Corsair H115i RGB Platinum
    Keyboard
    Logitech Craft
    Mouse
    Logitech MX Master 2S
    Internet Speed
    180mb upload. 11mb Download
    Browser
    Edge Chromium
    Antivirus
    Windows Security
    Other Info
    System used for gaming, photography, audiophile media center, work.
  • Operating System
    Win 11 Pro Dev build 22454.1000
    Computer type
    Laptop
    Manufacturer/Model
    Lenovo ThinkPad Yoga X1
    CPU
    Intel i7-7600U
    Motherboard
    Intel
    Memory
    16igg
    Graphics card(s)
    Intel HD 620
    Sound Card
    Onboard
    Monitor(s) Displays
    14.0 WQHD OLED Touch
    Screen Resolution
    2560 x 1440
    Hard Drives
    1TB NVMe Drive (OEM)
    PSU
    laptop
    Case
    laptop
    Cooling
    Laptop cooling
    Mouse
    Logitech MX Anywhere 2S
    Keyboard
    Laptop
    Internet Speed
    100MB
    Browser
    Edge Chromium
    Antivirus
    Windows Security

Wynona

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891
Location
Arkansas
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Windows 11
Why do you need to remove a driver before replacing a motherboard?
Because in my case, without the graphics card being reinstalled onto the mobo, the drivers kept looking for it and I got nothing but a black screen. I had to replace the graphics card, remove all the drivers to it, etc. Once that was done, my computer could see the onboard graphics.
 

My Computers

System One System Two

  • OS
    Windows 11
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop
    Manufacturer/Model
    HP Pavilion 590 p0xxx
    CPU
    AMD Ryzen 5 2600
    Motherboard
    HP 8433 (AM4)
    Memory
    24 GB Dual-Channel @ 1330 MHz
    Graphics Card(s)
    4095 MB NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1050 Ti (EVGA)
    Sound Card
    Realtek High Definition Audio
    Monitor(s) Displays
    Monitor 1 - Acer 27" Monitor 2 Samsung 24"
    Screen Resolution
    1920 x 1080
    Hard Drives
    Samsung SSD 860 EVO 500GB (SSD)
    Seagate ST1000DM003-1SB102
    Seagate BUP Slim SCSI Disk Device (SSD)
    Seagate BUP BL SCSI Disk Device
    PSU
    HP
    Case
    HP
    Cooling
    Standard
    Keyboard
    Logitech Wave K350
    Mouse
    Logitech M705
    Internet Speed
    50 mbps
    Browser
    Firefox
    Antivirus
    Windows Defender
    Other Info
    That's all Folks!
  • Operating System
    Windows 11
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop
    Manufacturer/Model
    HP
    CPU
    Intel Core i7 (10th gen) 10700
    Motherboard
    Intel
    Memory
    16 GB
    Graphics card(s)
    Intel UHD Graphics 630
    Sound Card
    Built-in
    Monitor(s) Displays
    Acer 27" & Samsung 24"
    Screen Resolution
    1920 x
    Hard Drives
    SSD (512 GB)
    HDD (1 TB)
    Seagate
    PSU
    Intel i7 10th Generation
    Case
    HP
    Cooling
    HP/Intel?
    Mouse
    Logitech M705
    Keyboard
    Logitech Wave K350
    Internet Speed
    50 mbps
    Browser
    Firefox 90.2
    Antivirus
    Windows Defender
    Other Info
    Headphone/Microphone Combo
    SuperSpeed USB Type-A (4 on front)
    HP 3-in-One Card Readr
    SuperSpeed USB Type-C
    DVD Writer

Dru2

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Windows 11 Pro 21H2 (22000.348)
Because in my case, without the graphics card being reinstalled onto the mobo, the drivers kept looking for it and I got nothing but a black screen. I had to replace the graphics card, remove all the drivers to it, etc. Once that was done, my computer could see the onboard graphics.
That's an anomaly, not an absolute everyday occurrence; thus, my counter would be I've never had to do that. And I've been building since 1998, with my last build in 2019.

Edited to add... Yes, anything can happen, but it's the consistency of occurrences that will determine actions needed. In this instance unless an action happens, I stick to the known working norm ;)
 
Last edited:

My Computers

System One System Two

  • OS
    Windows 11 Pro 21H2 (22000.348)
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop
    Manufacturer/Model
    Custom built
    CPU
    Intel i9-9900K
    Motherboard
    Gigabyte Aorus Z390 Xtreme
    Memory
    32G (4x8) DDR4 Corsair RGB Dominator Platinum (3600Mhz)
    Graphics Card(s)
    Radeon VII
    Sound Card
    Onboard (ESS Sabre HiFi using Realtek drivers)
    Monitor(s) Displays
    NEC PA242w (24 inch)
    Screen Resolution
    1920 x 1200
    Hard Drives
    5 Samsung SSD drives: 2X 970 NVME (512 & 1TB), 3X EVO SATA (2X 2TB, 1X 1TB)
    PSU
    EVGA Super Nova I000 P2 (1000 watt)
    Case
    Cooler Master H500M
    Cooling
    Corsair H115i RGB Platinum
    Keyboard
    Logitech Craft
    Mouse
    Logitech MX Master 2S
    Internet Speed
    180mb upload. 11mb Download
    Browser
    Edge Chromium
    Antivirus
    Windows Security
    Other Info
    System used for gaming, photography, audiophile media center, work.
  • Operating System
    Win 11 Pro Dev build 22454.1000
    Computer type
    Laptop
    Manufacturer/Model
    Lenovo ThinkPad Yoga X1
    CPU
    Intel i7-7600U
    Motherboard
    Intel
    Memory
    16igg
    Graphics card(s)
    Intel HD 620
    Sound Card
    Onboard
    Monitor(s) Displays
    14.0 WQHD OLED Touch
    Screen Resolution
    2560 x 1440
    Hard Drives
    1TB NVMe Drive (OEM)
    PSU
    laptop
    Case
    laptop
    Cooling
    Laptop cooling
    Mouse
    Logitech MX Anywhere 2S
    Keyboard
    Laptop
    Internet Speed
    100MB
    Browser
    Edge Chromium
    Antivirus
    Windows Security

Wynona

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891
Location
Arkansas
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Windows 11
That's an anomaly, not an absolute everyday occurrence; thus, my counter would be I've never had to do that. And I've been building since 1998, with my last build in 2019.

Edited to add... Yes, anything can happen, but it's the consistency of occurrences that will determine actions needed. In this instance unless an action happens, I stick to the known working norm ;)
Actually, I've been building since around 1985 or so.
 

My Computers

System One System Two

  • OS
    Windows 11
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop
    Manufacturer/Model
    HP Pavilion 590 p0xxx
    CPU
    AMD Ryzen 5 2600
    Motherboard
    HP 8433 (AM4)
    Memory
    24 GB Dual-Channel @ 1330 MHz
    Graphics Card(s)
    4095 MB NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1050 Ti (EVGA)
    Sound Card
    Realtek High Definition Audio
    Monitor(s) Displays
    Monitor 1 - Acer 27" Monitor 2 Samsung 24"
    Screen Resolution
    1920 x 1080
    Hard Drives
    Samsung SSD 860 EVO 500GB (SSD)
    Seagate ST1000DM003-1SB102
    Seagate BUP Slim SCSI Disk Device (SSD)
    Seagate BUP BL SCSI Disk Device
    PSU
    HP
    Case
    HP
    Cooling
    Standard
    Keyboard
    Logitech Wave K350
    Mouse
    Logitech M705
    Internet Speed
    50 mbps
    Browser
    Firefox
    Antivirus
    Windows Defender
    Other Info
    That's all Folks!
  • Operating System
    Windows 11
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop
    Manufacturer/Model
    HP
    CPU
    Intel Core i7 (10th gen) 10700
    Motherboard
    Intel
    Memory
    16 GB
    Graphics card(s)
    Intel UHD Graphics 630
    Sound Card
    Built-in
    Monitor(s) Displays
    Acer 27" & Samsung 24"
    Screen Resolution
    1920 x
    Hard Drives
    SSD (512 GB)
    HDD (1 TB)
    Seagate
    PSU
    Intel i7 10th Generation
    Case
    HP
    Cooling
    HP/Intel?
    Mouse
    Logitech M705
    Keyboard
    Logitech Wave K350
    Internet Speed
    50 mbps
    Browser
    Firefox 90.2
    Antivirus
    Windows Defender
    Other Info
    Headphone/Microphone Combo
    SuperSpeed USB Type-A (4 on front)
    HP 3-in-One Card Readr
    SuperSpeed USB Type-C
    DVD Writer

Dru2

Well-known member
Power User
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Local time
4:08 PM
Posts
1,154
Location
Virginia
OS
Windows 11 Pro 21H2 (22000.348)
Actually, I've been building since around 1985 or so.
Yeah, but when was the last time you built? I've several builds posted between the Vista forums and the Windows Ten forums ;)

And I know people who were building before me (some I learnt from), but no longer do so and are lost in today's hardware tech.

Peace :cool:
 

My Computers

System One System Two

  • OS
    Windows 11 Pro 21H2 (22000.348)
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop
    Manufacturer/Model
    Custom built
    CPU
    Intel i9-9900K
    Motherboard
    Gigabyte Aorus Z390 Xtreme
    Memory
    32G (4x8) DDR4 Corsair RGB Dominator Platinum (3600Mhz)
    Graphics Card(s)
    Radeon VII
    Sound Card
    Onboard (ESS Sabre HiFi using Realtek drivers)
    Monitor(s) Displays
    NEC PA242w (24 inch)
    Screen Resolution
    1920 x 1200
    Hard Drives
    5 Samsung SSD drives: 2X 970 NVME (512 & 1TB), 3X EVO SATA (2X 2TB, 1X 1TB)
    PSU
    EVGA Super Nova I000 P2 (1000 watt)
    Case
    Cooler Master H500M
    Cooling
    Corsair H115i RGB Platinum
    Keyboard
    Logitech Craft
    Mouse
    Logitech MX Master 2S
    Internet Speed
    180mb upload. 11mb Download
    Browser
    Edge Chromium
    Antivirus
    Windows Security
    Other Info
    System used for gaming, photography, audiophile media center, work.
  • Operating System
    Win 11 Pro Dev build 22454.1000
    Computer type
    Laptop
    Manufacturer/Model
    Lenovo ThinkPad Yoga X1
    CPU
    Intel i7-7600U
    Motherboard
    Intel
    Memory
    16igg
    Graphics card(s)
    Intel HD 620
    Sound Card
    Onboard
    Monitor(s) Displays
    14.0 WQHD OLED Touch
    Screen Resolution
    2560 x 1440
    Hard Drives
    1TB NVMe Drive (OEM)
    PSU
    laptop
    Case
    laptop
    Cooling
    Laptop cooling
    Mouse
    Logitech MX Anywhere 2S
    Keyboard
    Laptop
    Internet Speed
    100MB
    Browser
    Edge Chromium
    Antivirus
    Windows Security

Winuser

Well-known member
Power User
VIP
Local time
4:08 PM
Posts
1,856
OS
Windows 11
When a new Windows version is released you have the feeling that your old version currently use is (or will be) outdated and you have to upgrade to the new version. I always want the latest software to extend the life of my system. Microsoft's new system requirements were not a pleasant surprise, but thankfully there is a workaround. I don't know how frequently you replace your computers in USA, but here in Greece we don't normally replace it if we can still do our job or whatever other purpose we use it for, we can still buy new peripherals and connect to or install latest software. Forcing us to upgrade, regardless that it is far from obsolete for our everyday computing, is not desirable. As long as there is a workaround and our computers remain compatible with current builds and software, I see no reason to upgrade them, let alone replace them. Security is not a reason, since we hardly need this level of security on an average system. All we need is an updated antivirus and use the internet wisely. Not click Yes on every pop-up just to get rid of it. I too never read all the messages but I click on No instead or close the pop-up window from the X button. Never click Yes. Common sense.
When in doubt I won't click on anything. I will close the browser and restart my computer. They can easily change that click to direct you where they want.
 

My Computers

System One System Two

  • OS
    Windows 11
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop
    Manufacturer/Model
    PowerSpec B746
    CPU
    Intel Core i7-10700K
    Motherboard
    ASRock Z490 Phantom Gaming 4/ax
    Memory
    16GB (8GB PC4-19200 DDR4 SDRAM x2)
    Graphics Card(s)
    NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1050 TI
    Sound Card
    Realtek Audio
    Monitor(s) Displays
    Samsung SAM0A87 Samsung SAM0D32
    Screen Resolution
    1920 x 1080
    Hard Drives
    NVMe WDC WDS100T2B0C-00PXH0 1TB
    Samsung SSD 860 EVO 1TB
    PSU
    750 Watts (62.5A)
    Case
    PowerSpec/Lian Li ATX 205
    Keyboard
    Logitech K270
    Mouse
    Logitech M185
    Browser
    Microsoft Edge and Firefox
    Antivirus
    ESET Internet Security
  • Operating System
    Windows 11 Dev
    Computer type
    Laptop
    Manufacturer/Model
    HP Envy x360 15-ds1083cl
    CPU
    AMD Ryzen 7 4700U 2.0GHZ
    Memory
    16 MB DDR 4-2666
    Graphics card(s)
    AMD Radeon
    Monitor(s) Displays
    15.6"
    Screen Resolution
    1920x1080
    Hard Drives
    PCIe NVMe M.2 512GB
    Browser
    Firefox, Edge and Edge Canary
    Antivirus
    ESET Internet Security

Winuser

Well-known member
Power User
VIP
Local time
4:08 PM
Posts
1,856
OS
Windows 11
Because in my case, without the graphics card being reinstalled onto the mobo, the drivers kept looking for it and I got nothing but a black screen. I had to replace the graphics card, remove all the drivers to it, etc. Once that was done, my computer could see the onboard graphics.
I find that very surprising. Windows 10 and 11 are usually very forgiving when it comes to hardware changes. I have taken the OS drives out of one computer and installed it in another computer and Windows booted, activated and worked without a problem. I guess this shows that nothing is 100%.
 

My Computers

System One System Two

  • OS
    Windows 11
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop
    Manufacturer/Model
    PowerSpec B746
    CPU
    Intel Core i7-10700K
    Motherboard
    ASRock Z490 Phantom Gaming 4/ax
    Memory
    16GB (8GB PC4-19200 DDR4 SDRAM x2)
    Graphics Card(s)
    NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1050 TI
    Sound Card
    Realtek Audio
    Monitor(s) Displays
    Samsung SAM0A87 Samsung SAM0D32
    Screen Resolution
    1920 x 1080
    Hard Drives
    NVMe WDC WDS100T2B0C-00PXH0 1TB
    Samsung SSD 860 EVO 1TB
    PSU
    750 Watts (62.5A)
    Case
    PowerSpec/Lian Li ATX 205
    Keyboard
    Logitech K270
    Mouse
    Logitech M185
    Browser
    Microsoft Edge and Firefox
    Antivirus
    ESET Internet Security
  • Operating System
    Windows 11 Dev
    Computer type
    Laptop
    Manufacturer/Model
    HP Envy x360 15-ds1083cl
    CPU
    AMD Ryzen 7 4700U 2.0GHZ
    Memory
    16 MB DDR 4-2666
    Graphics card(s)
    AMD Radeon
    Monitor(s) Displays
    15.6"
    Screen Resolution
    1920x1080
    Hard Drives
    PCIe NVMe M.2 512GB
    Browser
    Firefox, Edge and Edge Canary
    Antivirus
    ESET Internet Security

spapakons

Well-known member
Member
Local time
11:08 PM
Posts
499
Location
Athens
OS
Windows 11 Pro 21H2 64-bit (build 22000.282)
Problems with graphics or other drivers that lead to black screen, are usually seen on old systems that there is not a driver available for some device. Windows try to install driver for this device and fails, so it never proceeds from the black screen to load the desktop. Uninstalling previous graphics drivers forces Windows to use the Microsoft Basic Display Adapter, in case a driver is not available. After you login to the desktop, Windows Update usually finds a generic driver and installs it for better graphics. Of course for the best possible performance and compatibility it is always recommended to download and install the latest official graphics drivers from manufacturer. If there is no driver for Windows 11, download for 10 64-bit or 8 or 7 or even Vista 64-bit. These always work with the exception of some Windows 7 graphics drivers that are made on purpose to prevent installation on 10 or 11 to force us upgrade our system. Sounds familiar?
 

My Computers

System One System Two

  • OS
    Windows 11 Pro 21H2 64-bit (build 22000.282)
    Computer type
    Laptop
    Manufacturer/Model
    Acer Extensa 5630EZ
    CPU
    Mobile DualCore Intel Core 2 Duo T7250, 2000 MHz
    Motherboard
    Acer Extensa 5630
    Memory
    4GB
    Graphics Card(s)
    Mobile Intel(R) GMA 4500M (Mobile 4 series)
    Sound Card
    Realtek ALC268 @ Intel 82801IB ICH9 - High Definition Audio Controller
    Monitor(s) Displays
    1
    Screen Resolution
    1280x800
    Hard Drives
    Samsung SSD 850 EVO 250GB SATA Device (250 GB, SATA-III)
    Internet Speed
    VDSL 50 Mbps
    Browser
    MICROSOFT EDGE
    Antivirus
    WINDOWS DEFENDER
  • Operating System
    Windows 11 Pro v21H2 (build 22000.438)
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop
    Manufacturer/Model
    Custom-built PC
    CPU
    Intel Core-i7 3770 3.40GHz s1155 (3rd generation)
    Motherboard
    Asus P8H61 s1155 ATX
    Memory
    2x Kingston Hyper-X Blu 8GB DDR3-1600
    Graphics card(s)
    Asus GT620-1GD3 (nVidia GeForce GT 620 1GB DDR3)
    Sound Card
    Realtek HD audio (ALC887)
    Monitor(s) Displays
    Sony Bravia KDL-19L4000 19" LCD TV via VGA
    Screen Resolution
    1440x900 32-bit 60Hz
    Hard Drives
    Patriot Burst Elite 480GB SSD as system disk, Western Digital Caviar Purple 4TB SATA III (WD40PURZ) as second
    PSU
    Thermaltake Litepower RGB 550W Full Wired
    Case
    SUPERCASE MIDI-TOWER
    Cooling
    Stock Intel CPU Fan, 1x 8cm fan at the back
    Mouse
    Sunnyline OptiEye PS/2
    Keyboard
    Mitsumi 101-key PS/2
    Internet Speed
    100Mbps
    Browser
    Microsoft Edge, Mozilla Firefox
    Antivirus
    Microsoft Windows Defender
    Other Info
    Legacy BIOS (MBR) installation, no TPM, no Secure Boot, WDDM 2.3 graphics drivers, WEI score 5.1

Wynona

Well-known member
Power User
VIP
Local time
3:08 PM
Posts
891
Location
Arkansas
OS
Windows 11
Problems with graphics or other drivers that lead to black screen, are usually seen on old systems that there is not a driver available for some device. Windows try to install driver for this device and fails, so it never proceeds from the black screen to load the desktop. Uninstalling previous graphics drivers forces Windows to use the Microsoft Basic Display Adapter, in case a driver is not available. After you login to the desktop, Windows Update usually finds a generic driver and installs it for better graphics. Of course for the best possible performance and compatibility it is always recommended to download and install the latest official graphics drivers from manufacturer. If there is no driver for Windows 11, download for 10 64-bit or 8 or 7 or even Vista 64-bit. These always work with the exception of some Windows 7 graphics drivers that are made on purpose to prevent installation on 10 or 11 to force us upgrade our system. Sounds familiar?
I wouldn't call a system that's less than a year old:

on old systems that there is not a driver available for some device.
 

My Computers

System One System Two

  • OS
    Windows 11
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop
    Manufacturer/Model
    HP Pavilion 590 p0xxx
    CPU
    AMD Ryzen 5 2600
    Motherboard
    HP 8433 (AM4)
    Memory
    24 GB Dual-Channel @ 1330 MHz
    Graphics Card(s)
    4095 MB NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1050 Ti (EVGA)
    Sound Card
    Realtek High Definition Audio
    Monitor(s) Displays
    Monitor 1 - Acer 27" Monitor 2 Samsung 24"
    Screen Resolution
    1920 x 1080
    Hard Drives
    Samsung SSD 860 EVO 500GB (SSD)
    Seagate ST1000DM003-1SB102
    Seagate BUP Slim SCSI Disk Device (SSD)
    Seagate BUP BL SCSI Disk Device
    PSU
    HP
    Case
    HP
    Cooling
    Standard
    Keyboard
    Logitech Wave K350
    Mouse
    Logitech M705
    Internet Speed
    50 mbps
    Browser
    Firefox
    Antivirus
    Windows Defender
    Other Info
    That's all Folks!
  • Operating System
    Windows 11
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop
    Manufacturer/Model
    HP
    CPU
    Intel Core i7 (10th gen) 10700
    Motherboard
    Intel
    Memory
    16 GB
    Graphics card(s)
    Intel UHD Graphics 630
    Sound Card
    Built-in
    Monitor(s) Displays
    Acer 27" & Samsung 24"
    Screen Resolution
    1920 x
    Hard Drives
    SSD (512 GB)
    HDD (1 TB)
    Seagate
    PSU
    Intel i7 10th Generation
    Case
    HP
    Cooling
    HP/Intel?
    Mouse
    Logitech M705
    Keyboard
    Logitech Wave K350
    Internet Speed
    50 mbps
    Browser
    Firefox 90.2
    Antivirus
    Windows Defender
    Other Info
    Headphone/Microphone Combo
    SuperSpeed USB Type-A (4 on front)
    HP 3-in-One Card Readr
    SuperSpeed USB Type-C
    DVD Writer

optimxr

Member
Thread Starter
Local time
2:08 PM
Posts
15
OS
Windows 10 Pro
Maybe, but the OP (optimxr) system IS "fully compliant" so no need to complicate things. For him the Media Creation Tool would work just fine. It's simple, quick, and easy. Why complicate things when there's no need to do so?
Hey Dru2, just got my Samsung 980 Pro M.2 SSD installed and initialized for GPT(see Attachment). I ran a CrystalDiskMark 1st test and the results seem pretty impressive(see attachment). I intend to move my C: drive image to this drive before I upgrade to Windows 11. Do you have any advise on how I should set this drive up to prepare for Windows 11? Are there some links that might better inform me as to how I should approach this?
 

Attachments

  • D-Box_DrvMgmt_SSD addon.JPG
    D-Box_DrvMgmt_SSD addon.JPG
    91.1 KB · Views: 1
  • Samsung 980 Pro SSD_1stBday.JPG
    Samsung 980 Pro SSD_1stBday.JPG
    41.7 KB · Views: 1

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    Windows 10 Pro
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop
    Manufacturer/Model
    Clone
    CPU
    Intel i5-2500K, LGA 1155
    Motherboard
    ASUS Prime z590-P
    Memory
    G.Skill Ripjaw DDR4 32GB
    Graphics Card(s)
    ASUS GeForce GT-730-SL-2GD5
    Sound Card
    None
    Monitor(s) Displays
    ASUS VX238H 23" HD
    Screen Resolution
    1280 x 1920
    Hard Drives
    Western Digital WD1001F, 1TB, SATA
    Hitachi HDS721010CLA332, 1TB, SATA, Hybrid
    PSU
    Roswill Glacier 850M
    Case
    Antec P7 Neo
    Cooling
    x3 120mm Chassis Fans
    Keyboard
    Logitech
    Mouse
    Logitech
    Internet Speed
    100 mb/s
    Browser
    Firefox
    Antivirus
    Bitdefender Full Security
    Other Info
    DVD-ROM Burner: LG UH12LS28, Blu-Ray x12, SATA
    HP G4010 Flatbed Scanner
    Epson R260 Printer
    Logitech Web Cam

spapakons

Well-known member
Member
Local time
11:08 PM
Posts
499
Location
Athens
OS
Windows 11 Pro 21H2 64-bit (build 22000.282)
You don't need any special preparation. Just clone your Windows 10 disk on the M.2 and boot from there. Provided you have installed all drivers, including the one for M.2 controller, you should be OK. If you have problem booting, use Windows 10 media and repair startup. If your installation is UEFI and your system is compliant, just mount the Windows 11 ISO to upgrade. If it is MBR or your computer is not fully compliant, start Setup and delete the file C:\Windows.~BT\sources\appreserres.dll before proceeding.

PS: I recently cloned a mechanical disk to an SSD and Windows had difficulty booting. After some failed attempts to repair startup, I decided to clone again. It turned out that the first clone wasn't successful (in spite Macrium reported otherwise). The second clone was OK and it booted in Windows 11. So if it doesn't boot to the desktop with the first time, or the second, don't hesitate to repeat the clone.
 

My Computers

System One System Two

  • OS
    Windows 11 Pro 21H2 64-bit (build 22000.282)
    Computer type
    Laptop
    Manufacturer/Model
    Acer Extensa 5630EZ
    CPU
    Mobile DualCore Intel Core 2 Duo T7250, 2000 MHz
    Motherboard
    Acer Extensa 5630
    Memory
    4GB
    Graphics Card(s)
    Mobile Intel(R) GMA 4500M (Mobile 4 series)
    Sound Card
    Realtek ALC268 @ Intel 82801IB ICH9 - High Definition Audio Controller
    Monitor(s) Displays
    1
    Screen Resolution
    1280x800
    Hard Drives
    Samsung SSD 850 EVO 250GB SATA Device (250 GB, SATA-III)
    Internet Speed
    VDSL 50 Mbps
    Browser
    MICROSOFT EDGE
    Antivirus
    WINDOWS DEFENDER
  • Operating System
    Windows 11 Pro v21H2 (build 22000.438)
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop
    Manufacturer/Model
    Custom-built PC
    CPU
    Intel Core-i7 3770 3.40GHz s1155 (3rd generation)
    Motherboard
    Asus P8H61 s1155 ATX
    Memory
    2x Kingston Hyper-X Blu 8GB DDR3-1600
    Graphics card(s)
    Asus GT620-1GD3 (nVidia GeForce GT 620 1GB DDR3)
    Sound Card
    Realtek HD audio (ALC887)
    Monitor(s) Displays
    Sony Bravia KDL-19L4000 19" LCD TV via VGA
    Screen Resolution
    1440x900 32-bit 60Hz
    Hard Drives
    Patriot Burst Elite 480GB SSD as system disk, Western Digital Caviar Purple 4TB SATA III (WD40PURZ) as second
    PSU
    Thermaltake Litepower RGB 550W Full Wired
    Case
    SUPERCASE MIDI-TOWER
    Cooling
    Stock Intel CPU Fan, 1x 8cm fan at the back
    Mouse
    Sunnyline OptiEye PS/2
    Keyboard
    Mitsumi 101-key PS/2
    Internet Speed
    100Mbps
    Browser
    Microsoft Edge, Mozilla Firefox
    Antivirus
    Microsoft Windows Defender
    Other Info
    Legacy BIOS (MBR) installation, no TPM, no Secure Boot, WDDM 2.3 graphics drivers, WEI score 5.1

ish4d0w

Active member
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Local time
10:08 PM
Posts
123
OS
Windows 10
The "latest and greatest hardware" is certainly not an ...


TPM (2.0) has been around since 2013
It might have been around but definitely NOT implemented in the firmware in so many cases.

in the BIOS (firmware TPM aka PTT)
I am struggling to find it in Gigabyte's B560 D3H which is not a very old board, it supports 10th and 11th gen CPUs...
And pretty much every laptop manufactured around that time include TPM 2.0.
Yes. Notebooks. And not desktops. They have just started, and quite many of them seem to miss FTPM/PTT virtual TPM
Additionally, near all motherboard vendors (Asus, Gigabyte, EVGA, MSI) have had firmware TPM since at least 2015. Again, hardly new tech. In the last 3 Gigabyte boards I bought since 2017 all have firmware TPM in the UEFI Bios ;)
I will have to double check this on Monday because the last time I checked it I couldn't find it. But I agree many boards have it and I was puzzled why I don't. I'll pull a fw upd.
Thanks, great read!
All that said, some are "conveniently overlooking" the fact that Windows 10 is still a viable OS with 3 more years of full support.
Right. I never argued that. My point of concern is what happens after those 3 years. Windows 10's life had been cut way too short. XP had a longer run...
Point?... one does NOT have to / need to upgrade to Windows 11 if their machines aren't compatible. And Microsoft isn't forcing it on incompatible machines!!!
I think a bit of research (facts) rather than emotions should rule here :)
Right... I still think of it like Microsoft excluded a lot of perfectly useful and powerful hardware here. And that's too bad, no matter how they portrait it.
 

My Computer

System One

Dch48

Well-known member
Member
Local time
4:08 PM
Posts
227
OS
Windows 11 Home
Yes, it bothers me that my fairly new Acer gaming laptop is not eligible for 11 because it's Ryzen 5 2500U processor is deemed to be not good enough. It meets every other requirement. I'm not forcing 11 onto it though. I'll stick with 10 and see what happens in the future. Who knows? They may decide to extend support longer.
 

My Computers

System One System Two

  • OS
    Windows 11 Home
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop
    Manufacturer/Model
    Custom built
    CPU
    AMD Ryzen 5 5600X
    Motherboard
    MSI B550-A Pro
    Memory
    16 GB DDR4-3200
    Graphics Card(s)
    PowerColor Red Devil Radeon RX 6600XT with 8GB GDDR6
    Sound Card
    Realtek integrated
    Monitor(s) Displays
    Acer Nitro 24" RG241Y
    Screen Resolution
    1920 X 1080
    Hard Drives
    Samsung 860 QVO 1 TB SATA SSD
    Seagate Barracuda 1 TB HDD
    PSU
    LEPA B650 650 watt
    Case
    Enermax Coenus
    Cooling
    Cooler Master Hyper T4 air
    Keyboard
    CM Storm Devastator
    Mouse
    E-Blue Cobra Jr.
    Internet Speed
    100mbs
    Browser
    Microsoft Edge Chromium
    Antivirus
    Microsoft Defender
  • Operating System
    Windows 10 Home
    Computer type
    Laptop
    Manufacturer/Model
    Acer Nitro 5 (AN515-42)
    CPU
    AMD Ryzen 5 2500U
    Motherboard
    Acer/ Freed_RRS
    Memory
    16 GB DDR4-2400
    Graphics card(s)
    Integrated Radeon Vega 8 and discrete Radeon RX 560X with 4GB GDDR5
    Sound Card
    Integrated Realtek
    Monitor(s) Displays
    Laptop screen 15.6" IPS
    Screen Resolution
    1920 X 1080
    Hard Drives
    1TB Crucial MX-500 SATA SSD in m.2 slot, 1TB backup SATA HDD
    PSU
    Battery power and Acer power brick/adapter
    Case
    Laptop
    Cooling
    Laptop fans
    Mouse
    Touchpad and e-Blue Cobra jr.
    Keyboard
    Built in backlit
    Internet Speed
    100mbps
    Browser
    Edge Chromium
    Antivirus
    Microsoft Defender

Dru2

Well-known member
Power User
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Local time
4:08 PM
Posts
1,154
Location
Virginia
OS
Windows 11 Pro 21H2 (22000.348)
Right... I still think of it like Microsoft excluded a lot of perfectly useful and powerful hardware here. And that's too bad, no matter how they portrait it.

In order for technology to advance sometimes things have to be left behind. Windows is moving into a new age.

And I'm in that boat with my 2017 Lenovo laptop because of the CPU, not TPM :(
 

My Computers

System One System Two

  • OS
    Windows 11 Pro 21H2 (22000.348)
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop
    Manufacturer/Model
    Custom built
    CPU
    Intel i9-9900K
    Motherboard
    Gigabyte Aorus Z390 Xtreme
    Memory
    32G (4x8) DDR4 Corsair RGB Dominator Platinum (3600Mhz)
    Graphics Card(s)
    Radeon VII
    Sound Card
    Onboard (ESS Sabre HiFi using Realtek drivers)
    Monitor(s) Displays
    NEC PA242w (24 inch)
    Screen Resolution
    1920 x 1200
    Hard Drives
    5 Samsung SSD drives: 2X 970 NVME (512 & 1TB), 3X EVO SATA (2X 2TB, 1X 1TB)
    PSU
    EVGA Super Nova I000 P2 (1000 watt)
    Case
    Cooler Master H500M
    Cooling
    Corsair H115i RGB Platinum
    Keyboard
    Logitech Craft
    Mouse
    Logitech MX Master 2S
    Internet Speed
    180mb upload. 11mb Download
    Browser
    Edge Chromium
    Antivirus
    Windows Security
    Other Info
    System used for gaming, photography, audiophile media center, work.
  • Operating System
    Win 11 Pro Dev build 22454.1000
    Computer type
    Laptop
    Manufacturer/Model
    Lenovo ThinkPad Yoga X1
    CPU
    Intel i7-7600U
    Motherboard
    Intel
    Memory
    16igg
    Graphics card(s)
    Intel HD 620
    Sound Card
    Onboard
    Monitor(s) Displays
    14.0 WQHD OLED Touch
    Screen Resolution
    2560 x 1440
    Hard Drives
    1TB NVMe Drive (OEM)
    PSU
    laptop
    Case
    laptop
    Cooling
    Laptop cooling
    Mouse
    Logitech MX Anywhere 2S
    Keyboard
    Laptop
    Internet Speed
    100MB
    Browser
    Edge Chromium
    Antivirus
    Windows Security

ish4d0w

Active member
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Local time
10:08 PM
Posts
123
OS
Windows 10
PS: I recently cloned a mechanical disk to an SSD and Windows had difficulty booting. After some failed attempts to repair startup, I decided to clone again. It turned out that the first clone wasn't successful (in spite Macrium reported otherwise). The second clone was OK and it booted in Windows 11. So if it doesn't boot to the desktop with the first time, or the second, don't hesitate to repeat the clone.
In that case, there must have been a problem with the cloning process because there is no difference to Winows between a hard disk drive and an SSD. Of course the latter is faster but other than that, same drill.

Make sure to clone disk , not partitions. If you don't want to clone all partitions then you can manually exclude some of them, after you chose to clone the whole disk. In this case, the MBR/GPT records are updated, as are other boot parameters. If Macrium gives you an option to update these settings then you should click yes.

Macrium is good for cloning, yet if you want to try something difference, I consider Acronis True Image to be the most reliable, above everything else. Sadly they moved to a subscription-only model, which is annoying because I merely use the core features - backup, restore, and cloning, and honestly don't need a new version every year, but still, it is my personal favorite as it had never failed on me, not even in the more complex scenerios, restoring to a different disk layout etc. AOMEI Backupper is also great for this purpose.
 

My Computer

System One

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