System See Sleep States Available on Windows 11 PC


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Sleep_states_banner.png

System power states describe the power consumption of the system as a whole. The operating system supports six system power states, referred to as S0 (fully on and operational) through S5 (power off). Each state is characterized by the following:
  • Power consumption: how much power does the computer use?
  • Software resumption: from what point does the operating system restart?
  • Hardware latency: how long does it take to return the computer to the working state?
  • System hardware context (such as the content of volatile processor registers, memory caches, and RAM): how much system hardware context is retained? Must the operating system reboot to return to the working state?
To the user, the system appears to be either on or off. There are no other detectable states. However, the system supports multiple power states that correspond to the power states defined in the Advanced Configuration and Power Interface (ACPI) specification. There are also variations of these states, such as hybrid sleep and fast startup.

This tutorial will explain and show you how to see the power sleep states available on your Windows 11 PC.

The following table lists the ACPI power states from highest to lowest power consumption.

Power sleep stateACPI stateDescription
WorkingS0The system is fully usable. Hardware components that are not in use can save power by entering a lower power state.
Sleep
(Modern Standby)
S0 low-power idleSome SoC systems support a low-power idle state known as Modern Standby. In this state, the system can very quickly switch from a low-power state to high-power state, so that it can respond quickly to hardware and network events. Systems that support Modern Standby do not use S1-S3.
SleepS1
S2
S3
The system appears to be off. Power consumed in these states (S1-S3) is less than S0 and more than S4; S3 consumes less power than S2, and S2 consumes less power than S1. Systems typically support one of these three states, not all three.

In these states (S1-S3), volatile memory is kept refreshed to maintain the system state. Some components remain powered so the computer can wake from input from the keyboard, LAN, or a USB device.

Hybrid sleep, used on desktops, is where a system uses a hibernation file with S1-S3. The hibernation file saves the system state in case the system loses power while in sleep.
[!Note]
SoC systems that support modern standby (the low-power idle state) do not use S1-S3.
HibernateS4The system appears to be off. Power consumption is reduced to the lowest level. The system saves the contents of volatile memory to a hibernation file to preserve system state. Some components remain powered so the computer can wake from input from the keyboard, LAN, or a USB device. The working context can be restored if it is stored on nonvolatile media.

Fast startup is where the user is logged off before the hibernation file is created. This allows for a smaller hibernation file, more appropriate for systems with less storage capabilities.
Soft OffS5The system appears to be off. This state is comprised of a full shutdown and boot cycle.
Mechanical OffG3The system is completely off and consumes no power. The system returns to the working state only after a full reboot.


Here's How:

1 Open Windows Terminal, and select either Windows PowerShell or Command Prompt.

2 Copy and paste the powercfg /a command into Windows Terminal, and press Enter. (see screenshots below)

3 You will now see which sleep states are available and not available on your system.

powercfg_a-1.png


powercfg_a-2.png


powercfg_a-3.png



That's it,
Shawn Brink


 

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In the screen shots shown here, it shows the problem I always see on Windows 11 when trying to use Hybrid Sleep: "The hypervisor does not support this standby state." How do we address this in Windows 11? Seems like Windows 11 is running Hypervisor by default, which renders Hybrid Sleep unavailable. Is that true, or is there a trick to get it working again?
 

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Brink

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In the screen shots shown here, it shows the problem I always see on Windows 11 when trying to use Hybrid Sleep: "The hypervisor does not support this standby state." How do we address this in Windows 11? Seems like Windows 11 is running Hypervisor by default, which renders Hybrid Sleep unavailable. Is that true, or is there a trick to get it working again?

Hello, and welcome. :alien:

If you have a device that supports modern standby, then you will not have the hybrid sleep state available by default.

 

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    Custom self build
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    Intel i7-8700K 5 GHz
    Motherboard
    ASUS ROG Maximus XI Formula Z390
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    16 GB (8GBx2) G.SKILL TridentZ DDR4 3200 MHz
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    ASUS ROG-STRIX-GTX1080TI-O11G-GAMING
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    2 x Samsung Odyssey G75 27"
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    1TB Samsung 990 PRO M.2,
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    6TB WD Black WD6001FZWX
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    Seasonic Prime Titanium 850W
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    i7-1065G7 3.9 GHz
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    Intel Iris Plus
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    Intel SST
    Monitor(s) Displays
    13.3" 4K UWVA AMOLED multitouch
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    512 GB PCIe NVMe M.2 SSD
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Hello, and welcome. :alien:

If you have a device that supports modern standby, then you will not have the hybrid sleep state available by default.


Yeah, no Modern Standby support. Here's the full list from powercfg:

1674058778578.png
 

My Computer

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  • OS
    Windows 11
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    Core i7 13th Gen
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    Gigabyte
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    64GB
    Graphics Card(s)
    MSI nVidia RTX 3060
    Monitor(s) Displays
    43" 4k 144Hz HDR, 32" 4k HDR in portrait, 12" 1080 touch/pen
    Hard Drives
    2x 2TB PCIe 4 in RAID1 (2TB capacity)
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    Corsair K100 RGB
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Brink

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Yeah, no Modern Standby support. Here's the full list from powercfg:

In that case, this could be from if you have Hyper-V enabled.

If you do, then you could test by temporarily disabling Hyper-V, restart the computer, and check your available sleep states again to see if hybrid is now supported or not.

 

My Computers

System One System Two

  • OS
    Windows 11 Pro for Workstations
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop
    Manufacturer/Model
    Custom self build
    CPU
    Intel i7-8700K 5 GHz
    Motherboard
    ASUS ROG Maximus XI Formula Z390
    Memory
    16 GB (8GBx2) G.SKILL TridentZ DDR4 3200 MHz
    Graphics Card(s)
    ASUS ROG-STRIX-GTX1080TI-O11G-GAMING
    Sound Card
    Integrated Digital Audio (S/PDIF)
    Monitor(s) Displays
    2 x Samsung Odyssey G75 27"
    Screen Resolution
    2560x1440
    Hard Drives
    1TB Samsung 990 PRO M.2,
    1TB Samsung 980 PRO M.2,
    6TB WD Black WD6001FZWX
    8TB WD MyCloudEX2Ultra NAS
    PSU
    Seasonic Prime Titanium 850W
    Case
    Thermaltake Core P3 wall mounted
    Cooling
    Corsair Hydro H115i
    Keyboard
    Logitech wireless K800
    Mouse
    Logitech MX Master 3
    Internet Speed
    1 Gbps Download and 35 Mbps Upload
    Browser
    Google Chrome
    Antivirus
    Microsoft Defender and Malwarebytes Premium
    Other Info
    Logitech Z625 speaker system,
    Logitech BRIO 4K Pro webcam,
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    Linksys EA9500 router,
    Motorola MB8611 cable modem,
    APC SMART-UPS RT 1000 XL - SURT1000XLI,
    Galaxy S20 Ultra 5G phone
  • Operating System
    Windows 11 Pro for Workstations
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    HP Spectre x360 2in1
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    i7-1065G7 3.9 GHz
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    16 GB LPDDR4-3200
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    Intel Iris Plus
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    Intel SST
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In that case, this could be from if you have Hyper-V enabled.

If you do, then you could test by temporarily disabling Hyper-V, restart the computer, and check your available sleep states again to see if hybrid is now supported or not.

I have not done anything to turn it on. I'm not running Hyper-V on this computer (have on others, but not on this one). I think it's something that runs by default for Windows 11 as part of the sandoxing apps for security. Could also be that it's associated with Windows Subsystem for Android, but while that's installed, I have it set to only run when I'm running an Android/Kindle Fire app, which I'm not. I don't see any user-friendly way to shut that down. I know I can go into the BIOS and disable virtualization, but is that really the only way to use Hybrid Sleep? Seems like overkill. Plus, on rare occasion, I do need virtualization, but admittedly not as often as I want Hybrid Sleep (every day).
 

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    Windows 11
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop
    CPU
    Core i7 13th Gen
    Motherboard
    Gigabyte
    Memory
    64GB
    Graphics Card(s)
    MSI nVidia RTX 3060
    Monitor(s) Displays
    43" 4k 144Hz HDR, 32" 4k HDR in portrait, 12" 1080 touch/pen
    Hard Drives
    2x 2TB PCIe 4 in RAID1 (2TB capacity)
    Keyboard
    Corsair K100 RGB
    Mouse
    Logitech G502
    Internet Speed
    Starlink
    Browser
    Edge
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    Logitech BRIO 4K for Windows Hello

Brink

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I have not done anything to turn it on. I'm not running Hyper-V on this computer (have on others, but not on this one). I think it's something that runs by default for Windows 11 as part of the sandoxing apps for security. Could also be that it's associated with Windows Subsystem for Android, but while that's installed, I have it set to only run when I'm running an Android/Kindle Fire app, which I'm not. I don't see any user-friendly way to shut that down. I know I can go into the BIOS and disable virtualization, but is that really the only way to use Hybrid Sleep? Seems like overkill. Plus, on rare occasion, I do need virtualization, but admittedly not as often as I want Hybrid Sleep (every day).

Yeah, you'll need it enabled for the other features.
 

My Computers

System One System Two

  • OS
    Windows 11 Pro for Workstations
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop
    Manufacturer/Model
    Custom self build
    CPU
    Intel i7-8700K 5 GHz
    Motherboard
    ASUS ROG Maximus XI Formula Z390
    Memory
    16 GB (8GBx2) G.SKILL TridentZ DDR4 3200 MHz
    Graphics Card(s)
    ASUS ROG-STRIX-GTX1080TI-O11G-GAMING
    Sound Card
    Integrated Digital Audio (S/PDIF)
    Monitor(s) Displays
    2 x Samsung Odyssey G75 27"
    Screen Resolution
    2560x1440
    Hard Drives
    1TB Samsung 990 PRO M.2,
    1TB Samsung 980 PRO M.2,
    6TB WD Black WD6001FZWX
    8TB WD MyCloudEX2Ultra NAS
    PSU
    Seasonic Prime Titanium 850W
    Case
    Thermaltake Core P3 wall mounted
    Cooling
    Corsair Hydro H115i
    Keyboard
    Logitech wireless K800
    Mouse
    Logitech MX Master 3
    Internet Speed
    1 Gbps Download and 35 Mbps Upload
    Browser
    Google Chrome
    Antivirus
    Microsoft Defender and Malwarebytes Premium
    Other Info
    Logitech Z625 speaker system,
    Logitech BRIO 4K Pro webcam,
    HP Color LaserJet Pro MFP M477fdn,
    Linksys EA9500 router,
    Motorola MB8611 cable modem,
    APC SMART-UPS RT 1000 XL - SURT1000XLI,
    Galaxy S20 Ultra 5G phone
  • Operating System
    Windows 11 Pro for Workstations
    Computer type
    Laptop
    Manufacturer/Model
    HP Spectre x360 2in1
    CPU
    i7-1065G7 3.9 GHz
    Memory
    16 GB LPDDR4-3200
    Graphics card(s)
    Intel Iris Plus
    Sound Card
    Intel SST
    Monitor(s) Displays
    13.3" 4K UWVA AMOLED multitouch
    Screen Resolution
    3840 x 2160
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    512 GB PCIe NVMe M.2 SSD
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Yeah, you'll need it enabled for the other features.

So is the proper conclusion that Hybrid Sleep is effectively no longer available with Windows 11? Why? Sleep works. Hibernate works. Seems the rest is just some simple configuration work to save the Hibernate file, then put computer to sleep. Only use the Hibernate file if computer restarts following a power loss.
 

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    Windows 11
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop
    CPU
    Core i7 13th Gen
    Motherboard
    Gigabyte
    Memory
    64GB
    Graphics Card(s)
    MSI nVidia RTX 3060
    Monitor(s) Displays
    43" 4k 144Hz HDR, 32" 4k HDR in portrait, 12" 1080 touch/pen
    Hard Drives
    2x 2TB PCIe 4 in RAID1 (2TB capacity)
    Keyboard
    Corsair K100 RGB
    Mouse
    Logitech G502
    Internet Speed
    Starlink
    Browser
    Edge
    Other Info
    Logitech BRIO 4K for Windows Hello

Brink

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So is the proper conclusion that Hybrid Sleep is effectively no longer available with Windows 11? Why? Sleep works. Hibernate works. Seems the rest is just some simple configuration work to save the Hibernate file, then put computer to sleep. Only use the Hibernate file if computer restarts following a power loss.

Hybrid has mostly been replaced by Modern Standby (if available).

Sleep or hibernate work as great alternatives if you don't want to shut down, or don't have Modern Standby.
 

My Computers

System One System Two

  • OS
    Windows 11 Pro for Workstations
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop
    Manufacturer/Model
    Custom self build
    CPU
    Intel i7-8700K 5 GHz
    Motherboard
    ASUS ROG Maximus XI Formula Z390
    Memory
    16 GB (8GBx2) G.SKILL TridentZ DDR4 3200 MHz
    Graphics Card(s)
    ASUS ROG-STRIX-GTX1080TI-O11G-GAMING
    Sound Card
    Integrated Digital Audio (S/PDIF)
    Monitor(s) Displays
    2 x Samsung Odyssey G75 27"
    Screen Resolution
    2560x1440
    Hard Drives
    1TB Samsung 990 PRO M.2,
    1TB Samsung 980 PRO M.2,
    6TB WD Black WD6001FZWX
    8TB WD MyCloudEX2Ultra NAS
    PSU
    Seasonic Prime Titanium 850W
    Case
    Thermaltake Core P3 wall mounted
    Cooling
    Corsair Hydro H115i
    Keyboard
    Logitech wireless K800
    Mouse
    Logitech MX Master 3
    Internet Speed
    1 Gbps Download and 35 Mbps Upload
    Browser
    Google Chrome
    Antivirus
    Microsoft Defender and Malwarebytes Premium
    Other Info
    Logitech Z625 speaker system,
    Logitech BRIO 4K Pro webcam,
    HP Color LaserJet Pro MFP M477fdn,
    Linksys EA9500 router,
    Motorola MB8611 cable modem,
    APC SMART-UPS RT 1000 XL - SURT1000XLI,
    Galaxy S20 Ultra 5G phone
  • Operating System
    Windows 11 Pro for Workstations
    Computer type
    Laptop
    Manufacturer/Model
    HP Spectre x360 2in1
    CPU
    i7-1065G7 3.9 GHz
    Memory
    16 GB LPDDR4-3200
    Graphics card(s)
    Intel Iris Plus
    Sound Card
    Intel SST
    Monitor(s) Displays
    13.3" 4K UWVA AMOLED multitouch
    Screen Resolution
    3840 x 2160
    Hard Drives
    512 GB PCIe NVMe M.2 SSD
    Browser
    Google Chrome
    Antivirus
    Windows Defender and Malwarebytes Premium
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5:34 AM
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6
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Windows 11
Hybrid has mostly been replaced by Modern Standby (if available).

Sleep or hibernate work as great alternatives if you don't want to shut down, or don't have Modern Standby.

What chipsets support Modern Standby? I have Z690 on my 13th Gen Intel system, and it does not. Plus, Modern Standby doesn't provide the core purpose of Hybrid Sleep (does it?): surviving a power failure with no loss of data or system state, without having to hibernate or shut down the PC every time you walk away from it.

Seems like Modern Standby is just faster-to-resume sleep, which has nothing to do with data protection, and only works with a few specific motherboards. Replacing Hybrid Sleep? Seems like saying that that comfortable new pillow on your bed is a replacement for a good life insurance plan: may help with sleep, but doesn't help anyone in the event things go wrong.

Anyway, sorry, not trying to be argumentative, just doesn't seem like there's a solution to my problem. Do you believe that there is no way to use Hybrid Sleep in Windows 11, at least not without weakening the security model that relies on the hypervisor? Is that even true that Win 11 needs Hypervisor running all the time? Does Windows 11 need it for standard functions, or is that perhaps where we should be looking for a problem with my configuration? Maybe I have something misconfigured or turned on that I don't really need? I don't want to reduce my system security, but if I can safely turn off Hypervisor without breaking sandboxing, happy to.
 

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    Windows 11
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop
    CPU
    Core i7 13th Gen
    Motherboard
    Gigabyte
    Memory
    64GB
    Graphics Card(s)
    MSI nVidia RTX 3060
    Monitor(s) Displays
    43" 4k 144Hz HDR, 32" 4k HDR in portrait, 12" 1080 touch/pen
    Hard Drives
    2x 2TB PCIe 4 in RAID1 (2TB capacity)
    Keyboard
    Corsair K100 RGB
    Mouse
    Logitech G502
    Internet Speed
    Starlink
    Browser
    Edge
    Other Info
    Logitech BRIO 4K for Windows Hello

Brink

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What chipsets support Modern Standby? I have Z690 on my 13th Gen Intel system, and it does not. Plus, Modern Standby doesn't provide the core purpose of Hybrid Sleep (does it?): surviving a power failure with no loss of data or system state, without having to hibernate or shut down the PC every time you walk away from it.

Seems like Modern Standby is just faster-to-resume sleep, which has nothing to do with data protection, and only works with a few specific motherboards. Replacing Hybrid Sleep? Seems like saying that that comfortable new pillow on your bed is a replacement for a good life insurance plan: may help with sleep, but doesn't help anyone in the event things go wrong.

Anyway, sorry, not trying to be argumentative, just doesn't seem like there's a solution to my problem. Do you believe that there is no way to use Hybrid Sleep in Windows 11, at least not without weakening the security model that relies on the hypervisor? Is that even true that Win 11 needs Hypervisor running all the time? Does Windows 11 need it for standard functions, or is that perhaps where we should be looking for a problem with my configuration? Maybe I have something misconfigured or turned on that I don't really need? I don't want to reduce my system security, but if I can safely turn off Hypervisor without breaking sandboxing, happy to.
I suppose you could test using Fast Startup. It's a form of hybrid sleep, but does use the hiberfile (C:\hiberfil.sys).

 

My Computers

System One System Two

  • OS
    Windows 11 Pro for Workstations
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop
    Manufacturer/Model
    Custom self build
    CPU
    Intel i7-8700K 5 GHz
    Motherboard
    ASUS ROG Maximus XI Formula Z390
    Memory
    16 GB (8GBx2) G.SKILL TridentZ DDR4 3200 MHz
    Graphics Card(s)
    ASUS ROG-STRIX-GTX1080TI-O11G-GAMING
    Sound Card
    Integrated Digital Audio (S/PDIF)
    Monitor(s) Displays
    2 x Samsung Odyssey G75 27"
    Screen Resolution
    2560x1440
    Hard Drives
    1TB Samsung 990 PRO M.2,
    1TB Samsung 980 PRO M.2,
    6TB WD Black WD6001FZWX
    8TB WD MyCloudEX2Ultra NAS
    PSU
    Seasonic Prime Titanium 850W
    Case
    Thermaltake Core P3 wall mounted
    Cooling
    Corsair Hydro H115i
    Keyboard
    Logitech wireless K800
    Mouse
    Logitech MX Master 3
    Internet Speed
    1 Gbps Download and 35 Mbps Upload
    Browser
    Google Chrome
    Antivirus
    Microsoft Defender and Malwarebytes Premium
    Other Info
    Logitech Z625 speaker system,
    Logitech BRIO 4K Pro webcam,
    HP Color LaserJet Pro MFP M477fdn,
    Linksys EA9500 router,
    Motorola MB8611 cable modem,
    APC SMART-UPS RT 1000 XL - SURT1000XLI,
    Galaxy S20 Ultra 5G phone
  • Operating System
    Windows 11 Pro for Workstations
    Computer type
    Laptop
    Manufacturer/Model
    HP Spectre x360 2in1
    CPU
    i7-1065G7 3.9 GHz
    Memory
    16 GB LPDDR4-3200
    Graphics card(s)
    Intel Iris Plus
    Sound Card
    Intel SST
    Monitor(s) Displays
    13.3" 4K UWVA AMOLED multitouch
    Screen Resolution
    3840 x 2160
    Hard Drives
    512 GB PCIe NVMe M.2 SSD
    Browser
    Google Chrome
    Antivirus
    Windows Defender and Malwarebytes Premium
Local time
5:34 AM
Posts
6
Visit site
OS
Windows 11
I suppose you could test using Fast Startup. It's a form of hybrid sleep, but does use the hiberfile (C:\hiberfil.sys).

Brink, Fast Startup just uses Hibernate to save the system state before a user has logged in for, as the name implies, a "fast startup" (by restoring the hibernated state rather than cold booting). It does NOT save the state of a user login during sleep. It is not related to Hybrid Sleep.
 

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    Windows 11
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop
    CPU
    Core i7 13th Gen
    Motherboard
    Gigabyte
    Memory
    64GB
    Graphics Card(s)
    MSI nVidia RTX 3060
    Monitor(s) Displays
    43" 4k 144Hz HDR, 32" 4k HDR in portrait, 12" 1080 touch/pen
    Hard Drives
    2x 2TB PCIe 4 in RAID1 (2TB capacity)
    Keyboard
    Corsair K100 RGB
    Mouse
    Logitech G502
    Internet Speed
    Starlink
    Browser
    Edge
    Other Info
    Logitech BRIO 4K for Windows Hello

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