W11 boot manger now plays nicely with other OSés


jimbo45

Well-known member
Power User
VIP
Local time
1:45 PM
Posts
2,021
Location
Hafnarfjörður IS
OS
Windows XP,7,10,11 Linux Arch Linux
Hi folks
Finally a decent Windows boot manager !! W11 bootmanager finally works nicely with other OS'es -- as well with multiple OS'es.

GRUB (Linux boot) doesn't hose up Windows any more if you do it properly -- simply when installing your Linux system on the same HDD / external HDD as Windiows systems create / (root partition), /home and optionally swap partitins on the HDD, install your OS, create a directory /mnt/boot and mount the EFI system partition (the one used by windows) to install the boot loader -- use your system documenation on how to install this (hint - you'll need package efibootmgr as well).

One word of caution -- I would make the windows EFI partition a bit bigger than the normal default of 100mb -- expand it to say 300 mb.

Anyway all working

Screen 1 of boot

Skjámynd 2021-11-12 071102.png

Screen 2 of boot
Skjámynd 2021-11-13 035849.png

All on 500GB external SSD device - so a really useful portable disk !!!!!!

Cheers
jimbo
 

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    Windows XP,7,10,11 Linux Arch Linux
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop
    CPU
    2 X Intel i7

SlicEnDicE

Well-known member
Power User
VIP
Local time
4:45 PM
Posts
1,060
Location
Finland
OS
Windows 11 Pro build 10.0.25206.1000 (Dev Channel)
This post would be hugely more useful if it contained actual steps to make this work, rather than just an informative post stating it can be/has been done. 😄
 

My Computers

System One System Two

  • OS
    Windows 11 Pro build 10.0.25206.1000 (Dev Channel)
    Computer type
    Laptop
    Manufacturer/Model
    Lenovo A485
    CPU
    Ryzen 7 2700U Pro
    Motherboard
    Lenovo
    Memory
    32GB
    Graphics Card(s)
    iGPU Vega 10
    Sound Card
    Realtek
    Monitor(s) Displays
    14" FHD (built-in) + 14" Lenovo Thinkvision M14t (touch+pen) + 32" Asus PB328
    Screen Resolution
    FHD + FHD + 1440p
    Hard Drives
    Intel 660p m.2 nVME PCIe3.0 x2 512GB
    PSU
    65W
    Keyboard
    Thinkpad
    Mouse
    Logitech MX Master 2S
    Internet Speed
    600/300Mbit
    Browser
    Edge (Chromium)
    Antivirus
    Windows Defender
    Other Info
    WSA: Installed
    SecureBoot: Enabled
    TPM2.0: Enabled
    AMD-V: Enabled
    VBS: Enabled
    HVCI: Enabled
  • Operating System
    Windows 10 Pro
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop
    Manufacturer/Model
    Custom
    CPU
    i7-7700k @4.8GHz
    Motherboard
    Asus PRIME Z270-A
    Memory
    32GB 2x16GB 2133MHz CL15
    Graphics card(s)
    EVGA GTX1080Ti FTW 11GB
    Sound Card
    Integrated
    Monitor(s) Displays
    32" 10-bit Asus PB328Q
    Screen Resolution
    WQHD 2560x1440
    PSU
    850W
    Case
    Fractal Design Define 7
    Cooling
    Noctua NH-D15 chromax.black
    Mouse
    Logitech MX Master 2S
    Keyboard
    Logitech G710+
    Internet Speed
    600/300Mbit
    Browser
    Edge (Cromium)
    Antivirus
    Windows Defender
    Other Info
    AC WiFi Card

jimbo45

Well-known member
Power User
VIP
Thread Starter
Local time
1:45 PM
Posts
2,021
Location
Hafnarfjörður IS
OS
Windows XP,7,10,11 Linux Arch Linux
This post would be hugely more useful if it contained actual steps to make this work, rather than just an informative post stating it can be/has been done. 😄
@SlicEnDicE

Here you are

First Windows :

So procedure is this :

1) prep main Disk - boot a winpe type system - macrium Free with the command box is an eay way to start plus ensure your install media is mounted say on vol D: -- Can be either internal HDD or external USB disk --external SSD via SATA->USB 3connector is just fine and response time will be excellent too.

2) disk part, clean, convert gpt.
3) create partition efi size=100 (If installing loads of Windows OS'es and linuxes then make a bit bigger e.g 300mb)
4) format quick fs=fat32, label="System"
5) assign Letter=H (or any you want)
6) create partition primary msr size=128 (leave unformatted)
7)) create partition primary
8) format quick fs=ntfs label="Main"
9)assign label=M
10) list vol Check the letters etc are OK
11) select vol xxx (should be the "M" partition
12) Create vdisk file=M:\Windows.vhdx maximum=60000 type=fixed (change 60000 to your wanted size) - probably will take a minute or 2 - you'll see progress status.
13) select vdisk file=M:\Windows.vhdx
14) attach vdisk
15) list vol -- the Vdisk will probably be shown without a letter
16) select vol xxxx -- select the vdisk
17) assign letter = V
18) exit

Now apply the windows image from your windows install media say on D:

so still in command mode
dism /Apply-Image /ImageFile
002.png
:\sources\install.wim Index:1 /ApplyDir:V:\ --- change index if windows edition you want is not nr 1. This step takes a little while depending on hardware -- progress is indicated.

now the boot manager :

v:
cd V:\windows\system32
bcdboot v:\windows /s H: /f UEFI

reboot and remove external devices.

If this is the only OS then this will be the default and boot automatically.

If you want another Windows do the same again booting from a winpe type media (e.g winpe itself / macrium free stand alone etc). Winpe itself or anything with a base winpe in it like Macrium free or even a Windows recovery media disk will work.

Don't add the 2nd OS boot mgr entry (bcdboot) from within a running Windows if you are running from a "Virtual hard drive" and only have Virtual Hard drives -- - it can hose up the primary boot manager -- at least I've found that's the case. By all means create the "Vhdx" and apply the image from within windows but boot the winpe type of system to attach the vdisk and create the bcdboot entry as shown.

Now the Linux system :

Add one partition for the root / partition (primary)
Add another partition for /home
Another for swap (optional)

Format those partitions as linux partitions from your linux install media -- I find xfs is the best but any Linux fs will do
install grub to your existing UEFI partition according to your Linux system -

Install your Linux system from the install media to the / and /home partitions

ensure :

1) ntfs-3g installed so you have read / write to Windows NTFS files
2) efibootmgr installed
3) ensure the original efi 100mb partition is big enough that will probably be OK but I'd make it 300mb just to be sure if loads of Windows systems and other OS'es on it. YOU DON'T NEED TO CREATE ANY MORE EFI PARTITIONS ON THIS HDD. !!!!

In the grub install mount the EFI partition -- mkdir /mnt/boot and then mount /dev/sdx1 /mnt/boot so you can install grub to the efi partition and then create the grub.cfg file -- I'll leave details there as different Linux distros have various ways of loading / configuring grub. I'm running arch-linux but fedora works as does Linux mint. Haven't tried others BTW.

for arch linux boot manager is done : (assuming you've installed the base system and still in arch-chroot /mnt)
pacman -S grub efibootmgr (package manager install efibootmgr and grub)
mkdir /mnt/boot/efi
mount /mnt/boot/efi /dev/sdx1 --- the HDD's EFI partition
grub-install --target=x86_64-efi --bootloader-id=GRUB --efi-directory=/boot/efi
grub-mkconfig -o /boot/grub/grub.cfg

Now exit and re-boot -- your windows bootmgr should show grub on the subseqent pages of boot menu as shown in the previous posts diagrams.

When you re-boot you will see grub or Windows boot manager in the bios menu. If you choose windows boot manager then you will get the grub menu as shown for booting Linux . For an internal system leave as default so you will see the boot manager - that will also give options of bootingup the external device (SSD) and you can choose any of the OS options on that device as per screen shots shown in previous post.

Have fun -- BTW W2K22 server also very good indeed , fast and 180 day free trial of course from Ms.

cheers
jimbo
 
Last edited:

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    Windows XP,7,10,11 Linux Arch Linux
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop
    CPU
    2 X Intel i7

Pirilampo2

Well-known member
Member
Local time
2:45 PM
Posts
153
Location
Abrantes, Santarém, Portugal
OS
windows 11 Pro 64-bits 21H2 22000.708
A question about the first post, to go from screenshot 1 (choose operating system) to screenshot 2 (use a device) what key do I have to press? Thanks in advance.
PS:- I have grub in dual boot Linux, and Windows 11.
 

My Computers

System One System Two

  • OS
    windows 11 Pro 64-bits 21H2 22000.708
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop
    Manufacturer/Model
    Custom self built
    CPU
    AMD Ryzen 3 2200G with Radeon Vega Graphics 3.50 GHz
    Motherboard
    MSI B350 PC MATE
    Memory
    16,00 GB TeamGroup DDR4-2667
    Graphics Card(s)
    Nvidia GeForce GT 730 & Radeon™ Vega 8 Graphics
    Sound Card
    nVIDIA GK208 HDMI/DP High Definition Audio Controller
    Monitor(s) Displays
    AOC 27"
    Screen Resolution
    3840x2160
    Hard Drives
    Seagate 1TB BarraCuda 64MB 7200rpm SATA III 3.5 - ST1000DM010
    PSU
    LC-Power 650W V2.3
    Case
    ATX Nox Hummer ZS
    Cooling
    No cooling
    Keyboard
    Logitech
    Mouse
    Logitech
    Internet Speed
    500/100
    Browser
    Firefox 100.0.2
    Antivirus
    Windows Defender
    Other Info
    Optical Drive ASUS DRW-24D5MT
  • Operating System
    Windows 11 Pro (x64) 21H2 Build 22000.708
    Computer type
    Laptop
    Manufacturer/Model
    Asus VivoBook Max X541NA
    CPU
    Intel Celeron N3350 @ 1.10GHz
    Motherboard
    ASUS X541NA
    Memory
    4 GB
    Graphics card(s)
    Intel Apollo Lake SoC - Graphics and Display Controller (12 EU) [B1] [ASUS]
    Sound Card
    Intel Apollo Lake SoC - High Definition Audio Controller
    Monitor(s) Displays
    NT156WHM-N42 15.6"
    Screen Resolution
    1366 x 768
    Hard Drives
    Seagate ST1000LM035-1RK172
    PSU
    Asus Battery
    Internet Speed
    500 Mbps / 100 MBps
    Browser
    Firefox 100.0.2

TheMystic

Well-known member
Power User
VIP
Local time
7:15 PM
Posts
698
OS
Windows 11
Hi folks
Finally a decent Windows boot manager !! W11 bootmanager finally works nicely with other OS'es -- as well with multiple OS'es.

GRUB (Linux boot) doesn't hose up Windows any more if you do it properly -- simply when installing your Linux system on the same HDD / external HDD as Windiows systems create / (root partition), /home and optionally swap partitins on the HDD, install your OS, create a directory /mnt/boot and mount the EFI system partition (the one used by windows) to install the boot loader -- use your system documenation on how to install this (hint - you'll need package efibootmgr as well).

One word of caution -- I would make the windows EFI partition a bit bigger than the normal default of 100mb -- expand it to say 300 mb.

Anyway all working

Screen 1 of boot

View attachment 13491

Screen 2 of boot
View attachment 13492

All on 500GB external SSD device - so a really useful portable disk !!!!!!

Cheers
jimbo
Hello @jimbo45

Is it possible to make one disk with Windows 10, Windows 11, Windows 11 Recovery, Windows 11 Installation and Windows 10 Installation - all with a single EFI partition that shows a menu like the one above?

Also, is there way to change the Windows 11 logo to the actual logo on the Boot Manager?
 

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    Windows 11
    Computer type
    Laptop
    Manufacturer/Model
    HP Envy dv7
    CPU
    Intel Core i7 3630QM
    Motherboard
    HP
    Memory
    16 GB
    Graphics Card(s)
    Intel HD Graphics 4000 & Nvidia GeForce GT 635M
    Sound Card
    IDT High Definition
    Screen Resolution
    1080p
    Hard Drives
    1 TB Crucial MX500 on bay 1.
    1 TB Seagate HDD on bay 2.
    Antivirus
    Windows Defender

Scott

Active member
Member
Local time
3:45 AM
Posts
287
Location
Maui, HI
OS
Win 11 Pro 22621.521
A question about the first post, to go from screenshot 1 (choose operating system) to screenshot 2 (use a device) what key do I have to press? Thanks in advance.
PS:- I have grub in dual boot Linux, and Windows 11.
On the first picture select "Change defaults or choose other options"
 

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    Win 11 Pro 22621.521
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop
    Manufacturer/Model
    Home Built
    CPU
    Intel(R) Core(TM) i7-8700 CPU @ 3.20GHz
    Motherboard
    ASUS Prime Z370-P II
    Memory
    CORSAIR Vengeance LPX 64GB (4x16GB)
    Graphics Card(s)
    EVGA GeForce RTX 3050 XC Black Gaming
    Sound Card
    Creative Labs PCIe Sound Blaster X-Fi Titanium (dan_k drivers)
    Monitor(s) Displays
    ASUS TUF Gaming 27" WQHD
    Screen Resolution
    2560 x 1440
    Hard Drives
    SAMSUNG 970 EVO 1TB NVMe (x2)
    SAMSUNG 870 EVO 2TB SATA III (x2)
    SAMSUNG 870 EVO 250GB SATA III
    PSU
    CORSAIR HX Series HX750
    Case
    Antec Dark Phantom DP502 FLUX
    Cooling
    Corsair Hydro Series H60 AIO
    Keyboard
    Logitech MK 320
    Mouse
    Logitech MX 1000 Laser
    Internet Speed
    200Mbs
    Browser
    Firefox
    Antivirus
    Winows Security
    Other Info
    UEFI, Secure Boot, TPM 2.0
    MR 8 HE

jimbo45

Well-known member
Power User
VIP
Thread Starter
Local time
1:45 PM
Posts
2,021
Location
Hafnarfjörður IS
OS
Windows XP,7,10,11 Linux Arch Linux
@Scott

just select the TAB key and it will tab down the choices including the one at the bottom which goes on to the next (and subseqent screens)

@TheMystic

You can have as many OS's you want using the vhdx physical disk method shown in the post -- so long as you've enough space on the HDD for all the virtual disk files -- and if you want a lot of them make the initial EFI file on the HDD bigger than 100mb -- I'd say 300mb. For each Windows type system create a vhdx file to hold the system, attach the vdisk, format ntfs (not GPT, and no EFI partition needed on these) as per the instructions and for each windows system use dism /Apply-image for each -- the image file is usually in /sources/install.wim except for the windows pe system if you use that where it's at /sources/boot.wim abd a 4GB vhdx is large enough for it. After applying the image boot into winpe or equivalent and write the boot mgr record with the bcdboot command as shown in the preceding instructions in this thread.

For Linux systems add a root ( / ) partition, a /home partition and optionally a swap partition formatted with the Linux fs you want to use as explained in the post.

I don't think there's any way of altering the logo on the boot menu -- unless you can find some way of messing around with the native code of the efi boot file itself -- I wouldn't bother.

Cheers
jimbo
 

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    Windows XP,7,10,11 Linux Arch Linux
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop
    CPU
    2 X Intel i7

badrobot

Well-known member
MVP
Power User
VIP
Local time
9:45 AM
Posts
907
Location
Toronto, CANADA
OS
Windows 11 Pro
My solution is straightforward. It's like loading a music CD of your choice. :lmao:

1636842389785.png
 

My Computers

System One System Two

  • OS
    Windows 11 Pro
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop
    CPU
    AMD Ryzen 9 3900X
    Motherboard
    MSI MPG Gaming Edge Wifi (X570)
    Memory
    32GB Adata XPG DDR4
    Graphics Card(s)
    ASUS GTX 1070 8GB ROG
    Monitor(s) Displays
    LG Ultrawide 34"
    Screen Resolution
    3440x1440
    Hard Drives
    Main Boot Drive : 512GB Adata XPG RGB Gen3x4 NVMe M.2 SSD
    PSU
    EVGA 600 Watts Gold
    Case
    Deepcool Genome II
    Cooling
    Deepcool Fryzen
    Internet Speed
    1Gbps
    Browser
    Chrome
    Antivirus
    "Moderna"
  • Operating System
    Windows 11 Pro
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop
    CPU
    i7-4790K
    Motherboard
    ASRock Xtreme6 Z97
    Memory
    16GB Corsair Vengeance Pro
    Graphics card(s)
    MSI R9 290
    Monitor(s) Displays
    LG Ultrawide 34"
    Screen Resolution
    3440x1440
    Hard Drives
    Samsung M.2
    PSU
    Thermaltake 475 Watts 80 Bronze
    Case
    Thermaltake Commander I Snow Edition
    Cooling
    Deep Cool Archer Air Cooler
    Mouse
    Logitech G402
    Keyboard
    Armageddon MKA-5R RGB-Hornet
    Internet Speed
    1Gbps
    Browser
    Chrome
    Antivirus
    Moderna :)

Winuser

Well-known member
Pro User
VIP
Local time
9:45 AM
Posts
3,368
OS
Windows 11
Wouldn't it be easier to just partition the drive(s). One partition for each OS install, and use a bootable install source for each OS someone wants to install?
 

My Computers

System One System Two

  • OS
    Windows 11
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop
    Manufacturer/Model
    PowerSpec B746
    CPU
    Intel Core i7-10700K
    Motherboard
    ASRock Z490 Phantom Gaming 4/ax
    Memory
    16GB (8GB PC4-19200 DDR4 SDRAM x2)
    Graphics Card(s)
    NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1050 TI
    Sound Card
    Realtek Audio
    Monitor(s) Displays
    Samsung SAM0A87 Samsung SAM0D32
    Screen Resolution
    1920 x 1080
    Hard Drives
    NVMe WDC WDS100T2B0C-00PXH0 1TB
    Samsung SSD 860 EVO 1TB
    PSU
    750 Watts (62.5A)
    Case
    PowerSpec/Lian Li ATX 205
    Keyboard
    Logitech K270
    Mouse
    Logitech M185
    Browser
    Microsoft Edge and Firefox
    Antivirus
    ESET Internet Security
  • Operating System
    Windows 11 Dev
    Computer type
    Laptop
    Manufacturer/Model
    HP Envy x360 15-ds1083cl
    CPU
    AMD Ryzen 7 4700U 2.0GHZ
    Memory
    16 MB DDR 4-2666
    Graphics card(s)
    AMD Radeon
    Monitor(s) Displays
    15.6"
    Screen Resolution
    1920x1080
    Hard Drives
    PCIe NVMe M.2 512GB
    Browser
    Firefox, Edge and Edge Canary
    Antivirus
    ESET Internet Security

badrobot

Well-known member
MVP
Power User
VIP
Local time
9:45 AM
Posts
907
Location
Toronto, CANADA
OS
Windows 11 Pro
It is easy. But updating each OS is another story. It messes up the boot manager most of the time. Been there.
 

My Computers

System One System Two

  • OS
    Windows 11 Pro
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop
    CPU
    AMD Ryzen 9 3900X
    Motherboard
    MSI MPG Gaming Edge Wifi (X570)
    Memory
    32GB Adata XPG DDR4
    Graphics Card(s)
    ASUS GTX 1070 8GB ROG
    Monitor(s) Displays
    LG Ultrawide 34"
    Screen Resolution
    3440x1440
    Hard Drives
    Main Boot Drive : 512GB Adata XPG RGB Gen3x4 NVMe M.2 SSD
    PSU
    EVGA 600 Watts Gold
    Case
    Deepcool Genome II
    Cooling
    Deepcool Fryzen
    Internet Speed
    1Gbps
    Browser
    Chrome
    Antivirus
    "Moderna"
  • Operating System
    Windows 11 Pro
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop
    CPU
    i7-4790K
    Motherboard
    ASRock Xtreme6 Z97
    Memory
    16GB Corsair Vengeance Pro
    Graphics card(s)
    MSI R9 290
    Monitor(s) Displays
    LG Ultrawide 34"
    Screen Resolution
    3440x1440
    Hard Drives
    Samsung M.2
    PSU
    Thermaltake 475 Watts 80 Bronze
    Case
    Thermaltake Commander I Snow Edition
    Cooling
    Deep Cool Archer Air Cooler
    Mouse
    Logitech G402
    Keyboard
    Armageddon MKA-5R RGB-Hornet
    Internet Speed
    1Gbps
    Browser
    Chrome
    Antivirus
    Moderna :)

SlicEnDicE

Well-known member
Power User
VIP
Local time
4:45 PM
Posts
1,060
Location
Finland
OS
Windows 11 Pro build 10.0.25206.1000 (Dev Channel)
On one of my machines, I have Windows 10 and Linux Mint installed side by side on same drive on their own partitions. Then I have Windows 11 installed as a VHD, which I can upgrade by plugging it into Hyper-V on the Windows 10 host. CUs I can do straight in native boot. If I needed any of the other Windows versions or special instances, I could add as many VHDs as I want.

I like this solution a lot. Easy to add and remove instances without having to worry about screwing up the 2 main systems.
 

My Computers

System One System Two

  • OS
    Windows 11 Pro build 10.0.25206.1000 (Dev Channel)
    Computer type
    Laptop
    Manufacturer/Model
    Lenovo A485
    CPU
    Ryzen 7 2700U Pro
    Motherboard
    Lenovo
    Memory
    32GB
    Graphics Card(s)
    iGPU Vega 10
    Sound Card
    Realtek
    Monitor(s) Displays
    14" FHD (built-in) + 14" Lenovo Thinkvision M14t (touch+pen) + 32" Asus PB328
    Screen Resolution
    FHD + FHD + 1440p
    Hard Drives
    Intel 660p m.2 nVME PCIe3.0 x2 512GB
    PSU
    65W
    Keyboard
    Thinkpad
    Mouse
    Logitech MX Master 2S
    Internet Speed
    600/300Mbit
    Browser
    Edge (Chromium)
    Antivirus
    Windows Defender
    Other Info
    WSA: Installed
    SecureBoot: Enabled
    TPM2.0: Enabled
    AMD-V: Enabled
    VBS: Enabled
    HVCI: Enabled
  • Operating System
    Windows 10 Pro
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop
    Manufacturer/Model
    Custom
    CPU
    i7-7700k @4.8GHz
    Motherboard
    Asus PRIME Z270-A
    Memory
    32GB 2x16GB 2133MHz CL15
    Graphics card(s)
    EVGA GTX1080Ti FTW 11GB
    Sound Card
    Integrated
    Monitor(s) Displays
    32" 10-bit Asus PB328Q
    Screen Resolution
    WQHD 2560x1440
    PSU
    850W
    Case
    Fractal Design Define 7
    Cooling
    Noctua NH-D15 chromax.black
    Mouse
    Logitech MX Master 2S
    Keyboard
    Logitech G710+
    Internet Speed
    600/300Mbit
    Browser
    Edge (Cromium)
    Antivirus
    Windows Defender
    Other Info
    AC WiFi Card

jimbo45

Well-known member
Power User
VIP
Thread Starter
Local time
1:45 PM
Posts
2,021
Location
Hafnarfjörður IS
OS
Windows XP,7,10,11 Linux Arch Linux
It is easy. But updating each OS is another story. It messes up the boot manager most of the time. Been there.
Hi there

I'm not sure why it should mess up boot manager -- if after updating the OS on the VHDX, simply boot from a winpe type of disk and simply update the boot manager !!!!
For typical Windows updates no need to boot in HYPER-V, and update from there -- windows updates work fine from vhdx files -- so lonf as for example you aren't switching to a totally new version. E.g 22000.184 updates fine to current version via standard WU. Boot mgr also not hosed up but if it is simply re-do bcdcboot from booting into winpe type of system.

The HYPER-V solution is a bit more fiddly as you don't want any of the paravirtualised hardware on your target windows physical system or additional EFI partitions. One EFI partition on the hdd is sufficient. Also if you are using Windows HOME edition then HYPER-V isn;t an option.

Cheers
jimbo
 

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    Windows XP,7,10,11 Linux Arch Linux
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop
    CPU
    2 X Intel i7

Winuser

Well-known member
Pro User
VIP
Local time
9:45 AM
Posts
3,368
OS
Windows 11
It is easy. But updating each OS is another story. It messes up the boot manager most of the time. Been there.
I use to dual boot back in the day when I had easy access to unplug my drives when doing an upgrade. The one time I forgot when I was doing an Insider upgrade the boot loader got moved to the wrong drive. My new desktop has a NVMe drive and a hard to get to compartment to access the second SSD so I now I use VMs when I want to run a different OS.
 

My Computers

System One System Two

  • OS
    Windows 11
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop
    Manufacturer/Model
    PowerSpec B746
    CPU
    Intel Core i7-10700K
    Motherboard
    ASRock Z490 Phantom Gaming 4/ax
    Memory
    16GB (8GB PC4-19200 DDR4 SDRAM x2)
    Graphics Card(s)
    NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1050 TI
    Sound Card
    Realtek Audio
    Monitor(s) Displays
    Samsung SAM0A87 Samsung SAM0D32
    Screen Resolution
    1920 x 1080
    Hard Drives
    NVMe WDC WDS100T2B0C-00PXH0 1TB
    Samsung SSD 860 EVO 1TB
    PSU
    750 Watts (62.5A)
    Case
    PowerSpec/Lian Li ATX 205
    Keyboard
    Logitech K270
    Mouse
    Logitech M185
    Browser
    Microsoft Edge and Firefox
    Antivirus
    ESET Internet Security
  • Operating System
    Windows 11 Dev
    Computer type
    Laptop
    Manufacturer/Model
    HP Envy x360 15-ds1083cl
    CPU
    AMD Ryzen 7 4700U 2.0GHZ
    Memory
    16 MB DDR 4-2666
    Graphics card(s)
    AMD Radeon
    Monitor(s) Displays
    15.6"
    Screen Resolution
    1920x1080
    Hard Drives
    PCIe NVMe M.2 512GB
    Browser
    Firefox, Edge and Edge Canary
    Antivirus
    ESET Internet Security

jimbo45

Well-known member
Power User
VIP
Thread Starter
Local time
1:45 PM
Posts
2,021
Location
Hafnarfjörður IS
OS
Windows XP,7,10,11 Linux Arch Linux
I use to dual boot back in the day when I had easy access to unplug my drives when doing an upgrade. The one time I forgot when I was doing an Insider upgrade the boot loader got moved to the wrong drive. My new desktop has a NVMe drive and a hard to get to compartment to access the second SSD so I now I use VMs when I want to run a different OS.
VMs are fine for some things - especially when used for initial releases of new Windows versions or running Linux distros on Windows Hosts but sometimes you need to test / try out on Real hardware - especially things like Graphics cards -- typical VM platforms such as VMWare / Oracle box which use a lot of paravirtualisation hardware as well as having some overhead so won't often be suitable for this. You can get some VM systems such as KVM/QEMU to run at almost native performance by using a lot of physical hardware but it's usually beyond the ability of an average user to get all the hardware to be "passed thru" to the VM. Containerisation and Kubernetes are also good ways of isolating and testing specific parts of different OS's.

Cheers
jimbo
 

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    Windows XP,7,10,11 Linux Arch Linux
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop
    CPU
    2 X Intel i7

blueskyler

New member
Local time
3:45 PM
Posts
4
OS
Windows 10
@jimbo45

hi, about your step to create usb with portable win11 and vhdx virtual drive.

Is efi and msr partitons are always required ?

if i want boot the portable win 11 from usb with efi and legacy bios should i do this ?
Code:
v:
cd V:\windows\system32
bcdboot v:\windows /s H: /f ALL
 

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    Windows 10

CornishRattler

Well-known member
Pro User
VIP
Local time
2:45 PM
Posts
1,786
Location
Cornwall UK
OS
Windows 11 Pro Beta, 11 Dev, W10 VHDX Triple Boot
As previously said in another post I tried the VM approach and failed miserably so I decided to triple boot with physical partitions. Works a treat.
 

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    Windows 11 Pro Beta, 11 Dev, W10 VHDX Triple Boot
    Computer type
    Laptop
    Manufacturer/Model
    Dell Alienware M15 Ryzen Edition R6
    CPU
    AMD Ryzen™ 9 5900HX
    Memory
    32GB
    Graphics Card(s)
    NVIDIA® GeForce RTX™ 3070 8GB GDDR6
    Hard Drives
    1 x Samsung 980 Pro 1TB
    1 x Samsung 970 Evo Plus 1TB

Latest Tutorials

Top Bottom