What boring 'officy' type of computers are the most reliable?


Haydon

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A question to the pros here who service computers. What boring 'officy' type of computers are the best when it comes to preventing disasters like in the quote below, quoted from a parallel thread? What boring 'officy' type of computers are the most reliable? (not just with regard to drivers) Thanks!

I had one of my devices get totally borked by an Intel System driver that came from Windows Update. I tried everything to fix it and the only solution that finally worked was a wipe and reinstall of Windows, followed by Intel chipset driver installation, RCA proprietary driver installation, and finally, Intel Graphics driver installation. That is a hassle on that device because some of it's drivers are proprietary and can only be received from the manufacturer. They also have to be 32 bit because there are no 64 bit versions. The device therefore can only run 32 bit Windows 10. There are no updates for the proprietary drivers either. On that particular system, updating drivers after everything is working is a big no.
 

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FrancoDT

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Ah, what's the fun in going boring 'officy' type of computer...lol (just kidding). Having owned a couple Alienwares sometimes I wish I had gone boring officy lol.
 

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  • OS
    Windows 11 22H2
    Computer type
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    Manufacturer/Model
    Alienware M17 R3
    CPU
    Intel Core i7-10750H (Comet Lake)
    Motherboard
    Alienware
    Memory
    32GB DDR4
    Graphics Card(s)
    NVIDIA GeForce RTX 2060 and Intel UHD Graphics
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    Realtek ALC3281-CG
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    17"
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    3840x2160
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    Micron 2300 NVMe 1TB
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    Logitech MX Master 3
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    50mbps
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    Vivaldi and Firefox
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    MS Defender and Malwarebytes Free
  • Operating System
    Windows 11 22H2
    Computer type
    Laptop
    Manufacturer/Model
    Microsoft Surface Laptop 3
    CPU
    Intel Core i7-1065G7 (Ice Lake)
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    Microsoft Corp.
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    16GB DDR4
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    Intel Iris Plus Graphics
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    Omnisonic Speakers with Dolby Audio
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    13.5” PixelSense Touchscreen Display
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    2256x1504
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    Toshiba Memory 512GB
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Wynona

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A question to the pros here who service computers. What boring 'officy' type of computers are the best when it comes to preventing disasters like in the quote below, quoted from a parallel thread? What boring 'officy' type of computers are the most reliable? (not just with regard to drivers) Thanks!

The article you are referring to:

Dch48 said:
I had one of my devices get totally borked by an Intel System driver that came from Windows Update. I tried everything to fix it and the only solution that finally worked was a wipe and reinstall of Windows, followed by Intel chipset driver installation, RCA proprietary driver installation, and finally, Intel Graphics driver installation. That is a hassle on that device because some of it's drivers are proprietary and can only be received from the manufacturer. They also have to be 32 bit because there are no 64 bit versions. The device therefore can only run 32 bit Windows 10. There are no updates for the proprietary drivers either. On that particular system, updating drivers after everything is working is a big no.
The first thing I would say is that the OPs desktop will be obsolete if and when he/she chooses to install Windows 11.

The first thing I would tell you is to read this article: Minimum hardware requirements

The reason being that it seems Microsoft has now stopped selling Windows 32 bit to OEMs. IOW, if I'm reading correctly, Windows 32 bit will no longer install on current hardware. And, again if I'm reading correctly, you cannot buy a 32 bit copy of Windows.

OK, with that out of the way, pretty much any computer will run pretty much any software. Of course there are "gotchas".

If one is playing games, at the very least, more RAM is needed. And most likely a pretty strong graphics card. Ant that's the limit of my knowledge in the games field.

If one edits photos, again, more RAM will be called for. And most likely, a good graphics card. @Barman can elaborate on the graphics issue.

When I first started to look at computers for home, I was quite frequently asked, "What do you want to do with it?" To which I answered, "Anything I want to!"

However, if you just want to use a computer for the "run of the mill" things like surfing the web, email, viewing photos, writing articles, and even creating a few tutorials, standard hardware will probably suffice. We're talking 8 GB RAM, built-in graphics and sound, a good monitor, etc.

Check out this link from YouTube:


There are plenty of videos to help guide you on your way . . .
 

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  • OS
    Windows 11 22621.819
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    Manufacturer/Model
    HP Envy TE01-1xxx
    CPU
    Intel(R) Core(TM) i7-10700 CPU @ 2.90GHz 2.90 GHz
    Motherboard
    16.0GB Dual-Channel Unknown @ 1463MHz (21-21-21-47)
    Memory
    16384 MBytes
    Graphics Card(s)
    Intel UHD Graphics 630
    Sound Card
    Realtek High Definition Audio
    Monitor(s) Displays
    Monitor 1 - Acer 27" Monitor 2 - Acer 27"
    Screen Resolution
    1920 x 1080
    Hard Drives
    WDC PC SN530 SDBPNPZ-512G-1006 (SSD)
    Seagate ST1000DM003-1SB102
    Seagate BUP Slim SCSI Disk Device (SSD)
    PSU
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    HP
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    Standard
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    Logitech Wave K350
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    Logitech M705
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    100 mbps
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    Windows Defender
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    That's all Folks!
  • Operating System
    Windows 11
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop
    Manufacturer/Model
    HP
    CPU
    Intel Core i7 (10th gen) 10700
    Motherboard
    Intel
    Memory
    16 GB
    Graphics card(s)
    Intel UHD Graphics 630
    Sound Card
    Built-in
    Monitor(s) Displays
    Acer 27" & Samsung 24"
    Screen Resolution
    1920 x
    Hard Drives
    SSD (512 GB)
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    Seagate
    PSU
    Intel i7 10th Generation
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    HP
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    50 mbps
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    Headphone/Microphone Combo
    SuperSpeed USB Type-A (4 on front)
    HP 3-in-One Card Readr
    SuperSpeed USB Type-C
    DVD Writer

Winuser

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I think this post would be better in the Chillout Room. It has nothing to do with needing support. And my answer to your question is that I have no idea of what computers are best for businesses.
 

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    Windows 11
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    Manufacturer/Model
    PowerSpec B746
    CPU
    Intel Core i7-10700K
    Motherboard
    ASRock Z490 Phantom Gaming 4/ax
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    16GB (8GB PC4-19200 DDR4 SDRAM x2)
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    NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1050 TI
    Sound Card
    Realtek Audio
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    Samsung SAM0A87 Samsung SAM0D32
    Screen Resolution
    1920 x 1080
    Hard Drives
    NVMe WDC WDS100T2B0C-00PXH0 1TB
    Samsung SSD 860 EVO 1TB
    PSU
    750 Watts (62.5A)
    Case
    PowerSpec/Lian Li ATX 205
    Keyboard
    Logitech K270
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    Logitech M185
    Browser
    Microsoft Edge and Firefox
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    ESET Internet Security
  • Operating System
    Windows 11 Dev
    Computer type
    Laptop
    Manufacturer/Model
    HP Envy x360 15-ds1083cl
    CPU
    AMD Ryzen 7 4700U 2.0GHZ
    Memory
    16 MB DDR 4-2666
    Graphics card(s)
    AMD Radeon
    Monitor(s) Displays
    15.6"
    Screen Resolution
    1920x1080
    Hard Drives
    PCIe NVMe M.2 512GB
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    Firefox, Edge and Edge Canary
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    ESET Internet Security

Haydon

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Perhaps I can rephrase the question to the professionals here who service typical computers in typical office buildings.

What type/brand/model of computers do YOU see in office buildings that just work without fail? (Despite adverse Windows Updates and what not)

And yeah, office computers are really boring for gamers, LOL. It was jimbo who coined the phrase 'boring officy computers' which I like very much, because that describes my main work computer perfectly (y)

It won't be only me who would be interested to know what people in the trenches consider reliable devices (as distinct from performance devices, for example)

In any case, the issue in this thread is reliability
 

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Porthos

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What type/brand/model of computers do YOU see in office buildings
The ones that the office got the best bulk purchase or the best deal from because they have purchased directly from and have a history.
In any case, the issue in this thread is reliability
Any computer can be reliable until it isn't. Does not matter who made it. It is just a box of electronic components.
 

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Haydon

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Any computer can be reliable until it isn't. Does not matter who made it. It is just a box of electronic components.

Well, computers that are only 'reliable' for 3 months won't get re-purchased. Perhaps the pros here can point out those bad ones for others to avoid.

Perhaps the pros here can point out the good ones for others to put on their short list.
 

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glasskuter

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There was a time I would have immediately answered Optiplexes or Precisions because the hardware was heavy duty and built for heavy use. Quality oozed out of them. Nowadays, I can't see much difference in the components in those models than cheaper mainstream units have. So if anyone is going to buy in todays market of OEM systems, buy the best specs for what you can afford. That said, I would recommend for anyone to build their own. It's not hard to do and you will know that you have the best quality components available. If you don't feel comfortable doing it yourself, seek help from one of your teckky friends or a reputable repair shop. Emphasis on reputable.
 

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  • OS
    Windows 11 Pro 22H2 22621.819
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop
    Manufacturer/Model
    Dell Optiplex 7080
    CPU
    i9-10900 10 core 20 threads
    Motherboard
    DELL 0J37VM
    Memory
    32 gb
    Graphics Card(s)
    none-Intel UHD Graphics 630
    Sound Card
    Integrated Realtek
    Monitor(s) Displays
    Benq 27
    Screen Resolution
    2560x1440
    Hard Drives
    256 m.2 2230-256+1 tb hdd
    PSU
    500w
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    MT
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    Dell Premium
    Keyboard
    Logitech wired
    Mouse
    Logitech wireless
    Internet Speed
    so slow I'm too embarrassed to tell
    Browser
    Firefox
    Antivirus
    Defender+MWB Premium
  • Operating System
    Windows 10 Pro 21H2
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop
    Manufacturer/Model
    Dell Optiplex 9020
    CPU
    i7-4770
    Memory
    24 gb
    Monitor(s) Displays
    Benq 27
    Screen Resolution
    2560x1440
    Hard Drives
    256 gb Toshiba BG4 M.2 NVE SSB and 1 tb hdd
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    500w
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    MT
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    Dell factory
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    Logitech wireless
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    still not telling
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Bree

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if I'm reading correctly, Windows 32 bit will no longer install on current hardware. And, again if I'm reading correctly, you cannot buy a 32 bit copy of Windows.
Actually what you buy is a key, and that is valid for a 32 or 64 bit install. Microsoft do not permit OEMs to supply their current machines with 32-bit Windows 10 (there is no 32-bit W11). The do however promise to continue supporting our existing 32-bit installs until Windows 10 reaches end of support in October 2025. That includes providing the install media for download using the MCT. So if you really needed to, you could still buy a licence for W10 and do a 32-bit clean install.
 

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System One System Two

  • OS
    Windows 11 Home
    Computer type
    Laptop
    Manufacturer/Model
    Acer Aspire 3 A315-23
    CPU
    AMD Athlon Silver 3050U
    Memory
    8GB
    Graphics Card(s)
    Radeon Graphics
    Monitor(s) Displays
    laptop screen
    Screen Resolution
    1366x768 native resolution, up to 2560x1440 with Radeon Virtual Super Resolution
    Hard Drives
    1TB Samsung EVO 870 SSD
    Browser
    Edge, Firefox
    Antivirus
    Defender
    Other Info
    fully 'Windows 11 ready' laptop. Windows 10 C: partition migrated from my old unsupported 'main machine' then upgraded to 11. A test migration ran Insider builds for 2 months. When 11 was released on 5th October it was re-imaged back to 10 and was offered the upgrade in Windows Update on 20th October. Windows Update offered the 22H2 Feature Update on 20th September 2022.

    My SYSTEM THREE is a Dell Latitude 5410, i7-10610U, 32GB RAM, 512GB ssd, supported device running Windows 11 Pro.

    My SYSTEM FOUR is a 2-in-1 convertible Lenovo Yoga 11e 20DA, Celeron N2930, 4GB RAM, 128GB ssd. Unsupported device: currently running Win10 Pro, plus Win11 Pro 22H2 Insider Beta as a native boot vhdx.

    My SYSTEM FIVE is a Dell Latitude 3190 2-in-1, Pentium Silver N5030, 4GB RAM, 128GB NVMe ssd, supported device running Windows 11 Pro.
  • Operating System
    Windows 11 Pro
    Computer type
    Laptop
    Manufacturer/Model
    Dell Lattitude E4310
    CPU
    i5 M 520
    Motherboard
    0T6M8G
    Memory
    4GB
    Screen Resolution
    1366x768
    Hard Drives
    500GB HDD
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    unsupported machine: Legacy bios, MBR, TPM 1.2, upgraded from W10 to W11 using W10/W11 hybrid install media workaround. In-place upgrade to 22H2 using ISO and a workaround.

    My SYSTEM THREE is a Dell Latitude 5410, i7-10610U, 32GB RAM, 512GB ssd, supported device running Windows 11 Pro.

    My SYSTEM FOUR is a 2-in-1 convertible Lenovo Yoga 11e 20DA, Celeron N2930, 4GB RAM, 128GB ssd. Unsupported device: currently running Win10 Pro, plus Win11 Pro 22H2 Insider Beta as a native boot vhdx.

    My SYSTEM FIVE is a Dell Latitude 3190 2-in-1, Pentium Silver N5030, 4GB RAM, 128GB NVMe ssd, supported device running Windows 11 Pro.

Haydon

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There was a time I would have immediately answered Optiplexes or Precisions because the hardware was heavy duty and built for heavy use. Quality oozed out of them. Nowadays, I can't see much difference in the components in those models than cheaper mainstream units have. So if anyone is going to buy in todays market of OEM systems, buy the best specs for what you can afford. That said, I would recommend for anyone to build their own. It's not hard to do and you will know that you have the best quality components available. If you don't feel comfortable doing it yourself, seek help from one of your teckky friends or a reputable repair shop. Emphasis on reputable.

Yeah, here is a very interesting article on the Dell Optiplex product line, from inception to now.


Specs can be downloaded from the Dell website, but it unfortunately doesn't say how well Optiplexes can stomach adverse Windows Updates, for example.

But pros in the trenches can say whether Optiplexes or Precisions or some other brands are prone of getting diarrhea or not, for example. And recommend other brands with strong stomachs (y)
 

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Winuser

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There was a time I would have immediately answered Optiplexes or Precisions because the hardware was heavy duty and built for heavy use. Quality oozed out of them. Nowadays, I can't see much difference in the components in those models than cheaper mainstream units have. So if anyone is going to buy in todays market of OEM systems, buy the best specs for what you can afford. That said, I would recommend for anyone to build their own. It's not hard to do and you will know that you have the best quality components available. If you don't feel comfortable doing it yourself, seek help from one of your teckky friends or a reputable repair shop. Emphasis on reputable.
I miss the days when I could go to local computers shows. They had some great deals and a very large selection of hardware and software. If you got there early enough and they had the hardware they would custom make your computer while you waited. Now the closest ones are somewhere around Baltimore MD. Too far for me to travel just to look around. Micro Center is now my go to place when I want to buy a new computer. The store in ST. Davids Pa is about 45 minutes from me.
 

My Computers

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  • OS
    Windows 11
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop
    Manufacturer/Model
    PowerSpec B746
    CPU
    Intel Core i7-10700K
    Motherboard
    ASRock Z490 Phantom Gaming 4/ax
    Memory
    16GB (8GB PC4-19200 DDR4 SDRAM x2)
    Graphics Card(s)
    NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1050 TI
    Sound Card
    Realtek Audio
    Monitor(s) Displays
    Samsung SAM0A87 Samsung SAM0D32
    Screen Resolution
    1920 x 1080
    Hard Drives
    NVMe WDC WDS100T2B0C-00PXH0 1TB
    Samsung SSD 860 EVO 1TB
    PSU
    750 Watts (62.5A)
    Case
    PowerSpec/Lian Li ATX 205
    Keyboard
    Logitech K270
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    Logitech M185
    Browser
    Microsoft Edge and Firefox
    Antivirus
    ESET Internet Security
  • Operating System
    Windows 11 Dev
    Computer type
    Laptop
    Manufacturer/Model
    HP Envy x360 15-ds1083cl
    CPU
    AMD Ryzen 7 4700U 2.0GHZ
    Memory
    16 MB DDR 4-2666
    Graphics card(s)
    AMD Radeon
    Monitor(s) Displays
    15.6"
    Screen Resolution
    1920x1080
    Hard Drives
    PCIe NVMe M.2 512GB
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    Firefox, Edge and Edge Canary
    Antivirus
    ESET Internet Security

Haydon

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I once chatted with a very knowledgeable builder who among other things built her (yes, it is a she) own mega crypto-computer. She opined that she would prefer Acer or Asus, as they write their drivers in pretty conventional ways, as distinct from Dell writing their drivers in pretty unique ways. So, it may be that Acer or Asus are more resilient than Dell to bad Windows Updates (or to any bad events in the Windows ecology) or it may be that that has no effect at all on resilience, who knows.

And no, I would not build my own systems, it would cost 10 times more and the result would be 100 times worse :scream:
 

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Wynona

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Actually what you buy is a key, and that is valid for a 32 or 64 bit install. Microsoft do not permit OEMs to supply their current machines with 32-bit Windows 10 (there is no 32-bit W11). The do however promise to continue supporting our existing 32-bit installs until Windows 10 reaches end of support in October 2025. That includes providing the install media for download using the MCT. So if you really needed to, you could still buy a licence for W10 and do a 32-bit clean install.
Yes, I know all that, but what I was referring to was the original post. The question is about a new computer.
 

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  • OS
    Windows 11 22621.819
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    PC/Desktop
    Manufacturer/Model
    HP Envy TE01-1xxx
    CPU
    Intel(R) Core(TM) i7-10700 CPU @ 2.90GHz 2.90 GHz
    Motherboard
    16.0GB Dual-Channel Unknown @ 1463MHz (21-21-21-47)
    Memory
    16384 MBytes
    Graphics Card(s)
    Intel UHD Graphics 630
    Sound Card
    Realtek High Definition Audio
    Monitor(s) Displays
    Monitor 1 - Acer 27" Monitor 2 - Acer 27"
    Screen Resolution
    1920 x 1080
    Hard Drives
    WDC PC SN530 SDBPNPZ-512G-1006 (SSD)
    Seagate ST1000DM003-1SB102
    Seagate BUP Slim SCSI Disk Device (SSD)
    PSU
    HP
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    HP
    Cooling
    Standard
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    Logitech Wave K350
    Mouse
    Logitech M705
    Internet Speed
    100 mbps
    Browser
    Firefox
    Antivirus
    Windows Defender
    Other Info
    That's all Folks!
  • Operating System
    Windows 11
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop
    Manufacturer/Model
    HP
    CPU
    Intel Core i7 (10th gen) 10700
    Motherboard
    Intel
    Memory
    16 GB
    Graphics card(s)
    Intel UHD Graphics 630
    Sound Card
    Built-in
    Monitor(s) Displays
    Acer 27" & Samsung 24"
    Screen Resolution
    1920 x
    Hard Drives
    SSD (512 GB)
    HDD (1 TB)
    Seagate
    PSU
    Intel i7 10th Generation
    Case
    HP
    Cooling
    HP/Intel?
    Mouse
    Logitech M705
    Keyboard
    Logitech Wave K350
    Internet Speed
    50 mbps
    Browser
    Firefox 90.2
    Antivirus
    Windows Defender
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    Headphone/Microphone Combo
    SuperSpeed USB Type-A (4 on front)
    HP 3-in-One Card Readr
    SuperSpeed USB Type-C
    DVD Writer

Ismeegaaaabe

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The Lenovo T15s are super boring but there very reliable in terms of warranty from lenovo and super good! :)
 

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    Windows 11 Pro
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    Laptop
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    ASUStek
    CPU
    i7-9750H
    Memory
    32GB DDR4 3200mhz
    Graphics Card(s)
    GTX 1650
    Screen Resolution
    1920x108-
    Hard Drives
    1TB Intel Nvme 512SATA SSD
    Keyboard
    ASUS TUFK5
    Mouse
    Razer Hyper X
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    Brave
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    Webroot Endpoint Protection

Haydon

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Yes, I know all that, but what I was referring to was the original post. The question is about a new computer.

Well, f you had addressed the reliability issue in the OP and in the title of the thread, then it would have been right (y)
----------------------
One other thing that may have a bearing on the issue at hand is this. It used to be that office productivity apps (I am not talking about games) are VERY demanding performance-wise on boring officy computers, hence the often given opinion to buy the best specs you can afford. But office productivity apps these days can run very well on contemporary Celerons and Pentiums! Of course, it would take only a few years for the Celerons and Pentiums to slow down on the further developing office productivity apps. You get better longevity with a system with higher specs. But even a modest i5 that is widely considered main stream these days can virtually guarantee you a decade worth of performance reserves in the specs vs apps race. So, the specs vs apps race is a non-issue for longevity, IMHO.

But reliability is an issue IMHO if you're aiming for a decade of longevity. How to gauge that if you are not asking people who are in the position to watch?
 

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Haydon

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The Lenovo T15s are super boring but there very reliable in terms of warranty from lenovo and super good! :)
Yeah, they are quite expensive too, but may be worth the $ if they just keep working without fail. Your sig says that you are an IT pro, is that what you observed about the T15s? (I don't mean the warranty)

Edit: Comparing to the Optiplexes that were mentioned in the above. The model numbers beginning with '5' (like the Optiplex 5090) are the mainstream models, the '3' and the '7' are below and above, respectively. It looks like the Rolls Royces of the past are now manufactured to a price point.
 
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bobkn

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I doubt that the question has a solid answer.

From 2001 to 2016, my employer used Dells on 3 year leases. Because I pretended to be an engineer, they gave me Precision workstations.

Over the 3 year term, they were all entirely reliable. There was not much of an issue with Windows updates, partly because they were controlled by the company's IT department. Major OS upgrades were typically delayed by years, after retail release. I think that a lot of the PCs there now (I left nearly 6 years ago) are still on 7.

I'm not sure that company should be taken as a shining example, though. A lot of the CAD designers were getting by with small, low-res monitors. I don't know if the company would have supplied larger if requested. I was a bit annoyed when I was offered a second monitor - with a native resolution of 1680 X 1050. Who on Earth bought those, in 2015? (The pro software I used benefited from lots of horizontal pixels.)
 

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  • OS
    Windows 11 22621.898
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop
    Manufacturer/Model
    homebuilt
    CPU
    Intel I9-13900K
    Motherboard
    Asus RoG Strix Z690-E
    Memory
    64GB G.Skill DDR5-6000
    Graphics Card(s)
    Gigabyte RTX 4090 OC
    Sound Card
    none (USB to speakers), Realtek
    Monitor(s) Displays
    Viewsonic XG320U
    Screen Resolution
    3840 X 2160 @ 144Hz
    Hard Drives
    WB Black SN850 1TB M.2 NVME SSD
    Samsung 970 Evo 4TB
    PSU
    eVGA SuperNOVA 1300 GT
    Case
    Corsair 5000D AIrflow
    Cooling
    Corsair iCUE H150i ELITE CAPELLIX Liquid CPU Cooler
    Keyboard
    Logitech K120 (wired)
    Mouse
    Logitech M500s (wired)
    Internet Speed
    1200 Mbps
  • Operating System
    windows 11 22621.898
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop
    Manufacturer/Model
    homebuilt
    CPU
    Ryzen 9 5950X
    Motherboard
    Asus Tuf Gaming X570-Plus
    Memory
    64GB DDR4 3800 (@ 3600)
    Graphics card(s)
    Gigabyte RTX 3090 ti
    Sound Card
    built in Realtek
    Monitor(s) Displays
    Asus PA329C
    Screen Resolution
    3840 X 2160
    Hard Drives
    Sabrent 1 TB PCI-E 4.0 X4 NVME M.2
    8 TB Seagate Ironwolf
    4TB Seagate Ironwolf
    PSU
    eVGA SuperNOVA 850 G6
    Case
    Phanteks ENTHOO Pro M
    Cooling
    iCUE H115i RGB PRO XT Liquid CPU Cooler
    Mouse
    Logitech M500s (wired)
    Keyboard
    Logitech K120 (wired)

z3r010

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If I was working back in Industry now, I'd supply everybody with NUC's or similar stuck to the back of their monitors, that way I could carry an entire swap-out PC in my coat pocket and not have my car filled with PCs and parts.
 

My Computers

System One System Two

  • OS
    Windows 11 Workstation
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop
    Manufacturer/Model
    doofenshmirtz evil incorporated
    CPU
    Ryzen 9 5950X
    Motherboard
    Asus ROG Crosshair VIII Formula
    Memory
    Corsair Vengeance RGB PRO Black 64GB (4x16GB) 3600MHz AMD Ryzen Tuned DDR4
    Graphics Card(s)
    ASUS AMD Radeon RX 6900 XT 16GB ROG Strix LC OC
    Sound Card
    Sound BlasterX Katana
    Monitor(s) Displays
    3 x27" Dell U2715H & 1 x 34" Dell U3415W
    Hard Drives
    Samsung 980 Pro 1TB M.2 2280 PCI-e 4.0 x4 NVMe Solid State
    Drive
    PSU
    ASUS ROG THOR 850W 80 Plus Platinum
    Case
    ASUS ROG Strix Helios Midi-Tower ARGB Gaming Case
    Cooling
    ASUS ROG Strix LC Performance RGB AIO CPU Liquid Cooler - 360mm
    Keyboard
    Logi Ergo
    Mouse
    Logitech MX Master 3
    Internet Speed
    900/100 Mbps
    Browser
    Chrome
    Antivirus
    Windows Defender, Malwarebytes Pro
    Other Info
    HP M281 Printer
    Logitech Brio Stream webcam
    Yeti X mic
  • Operating System
    Windows 10
    Computer type
    Laptop
    Manufacturer/Model
    Surface Laptop
    CPU
    i7

Haydon

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I doubt that the question has a solid answer.

From 2001 to 2016, my employer used Dells on 3 year leases. Because I pretended to be an engineer, they gave me Precision workstations.

Over the 3 year term, they were all entirely reliable. There was not much of an issue with Windows updates, partly because they were controlled by the company's IT department. Major OS upgrades were typically delayed by years, after retail release. I think that a lot of the PCs there now (I left nearly 6 years ago) are still on 7.

I'm not sure that company should be taken as a shining example, though. A lot of the CAD designers were getting by with small, low-res monitors. I don't know if the company would have supplied larger if requested. I was a bit annoyed when I was offered a second monitor - with a native resolution of 1680 X 1050. Who on Earth bought those, in 2015? (The pro software I used benefited from lots of horizontal pixels.)

Yeah, I love tossing up issues for which there are no boring pull-out-of-your-pocket answers :cool:

Waiting for 3+ years after RTM gets you a mature OS and improved system reliability, which is what happens if you buy a new computer just before your old one runs out of support. Most people will want to keep their SOHO computers for much longer than 3 years. Maybe people are buying a new SOHO computer if all the old one needs is a bit of maintenance.

With the W11 announcement, MS announced shorter Windows lifecycles. Such 'bad news' announcements happen for a reason, perhaps there are too many EOL issues in the real world.
 

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    Windows 10 Pro

Haydon

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If I was working back in Industry now, I'd supply everybody with NUC's or similar stuck to the back of their monitors, that way I could carry an entire swap-out PC in my coat pocket and not have my car filled with PCs and parts.

Laptop & docking station is more common, I think. Connecting & disconnecting NUCs get old pretty quick.

I haven't heard of one, but I would be interested in a docking station for NUC with many additional ports (y)
 

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    Windows 10 Pro
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