Solved Windows 11 TPM 2.0 Requirement

NavyLCDR

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NEVERMIND! DUH! I see the thread with the fix in it!

I tried to upgrade Windows 10 to Windows 11 on my gaming desktop which has an Asus ROG Crosshair VII Hero (WiFi) motherboard and Ryzen 7 3800XT CPU. I get the TPM 2.0 error. However, I was able to apply the Windows 11 image to a partition using dism and I am posting this from the same computer in Windows 11. I also just tried an in-place upgrade repair install and setup is complaining about TPM 2.0. Does anyone know a workaround that will let you run Windows 11 setup and bypass the check for TPM 2.0? I would really like to be able to upgrade, rather than have to do clean installs using the dism /apply-image method.

Thanks! And good to see all my TenForums friends here!

NEVERMIND! DUH! I see the thread with the fix in it!
 

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  • Operating System
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    AMD Ryzen 7 3800XT
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    ASUS ROG Crosshair VII Hero (WiFi)
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    32GB
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  • Operating System
    Windows 11 Education
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    Dell Inspiron 7773
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    Intel i7-8550U
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    32GB
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ish4d0w

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Hello and welcome to ElevenForum!
Yes, it seems possible to modify the installer to bypass this check and allow upgrades however for now, this should not be necessary. The chart below is from Tenforums and I believe original source is MS. It seems they will allow installs and upgrades on unsupported hardware for as long as Windows 11 is testing,
By that time we should have an idea on why this check even exists and what are the consequences or losses when you run Windows 11 on an older machine without a TPM.
If all it takes is to disable/bypass this check then I believe it can and will be bypasssed. But I'm starting to think that MS did this on purpose and they have plans with it. I did not believe that TPM2.0 would be a requirement as of the leaked build but since it is a requirement in the insider build announced today, well... we shall see!


HardwareChannels6_24-final.png
 

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hsehestedt

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Welcome, NavyLCDR. Great to see you here.

Looking forward to your sage advice in this forum!
 

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  • Operating System
    Windows 11 21H2
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop
    Manufacturer/Model
    Home Built
    CPU
    Intel i7-11700K
    Motherboard
    ASUS Prime Z590-A
    Memory
    128GB Crucial Ballistix 3200MHz DRAM
    Graphics Card(s)
    No GPU - CPU graphics only (for now)
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    HP Envy 32
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    2560 x 1440
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    1 x 1TB NVMe Gen 4 x 4 SSD
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    2 x 512GB 2.5" SSDs
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    Corsair HX850i
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    Corsair iCue 5000X RGB
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    Noctua NH-D15 chromax.black cooler + 10 case fans
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    CODE backlit mechanical keyboard
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    ASUS ThunderboltEX 4 PCIe adapter
  • Operating System
    Windows 11 21H2
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    Laptop
    Manufacturer/Model
    HP Spectre x360 15-BL012DX
    CPU
    Intel i7-7500U
    Memory
    32GB
    Graphics card(s)
    Dual Intel HD 620 and Nvidia GeForce 940MX
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    Built-in Realtek HD Audio
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    4k 15-inch
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    4k (3840 x 2160)
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    1TB Seagate FireCuda 510 NVMe SSD
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    RAM Upgraded from 16GB to 32GB WiFi Upgraded from WiFi 5 to WiFi 6 SSD upgraded from 512GB NVMe SSD to 1TB Seagate FireCuda 510 NVMe SSD

Pendaws

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I have gotten past the TPM warning thing with a little bit of file replacing. I have put it on my main machine (on a new HDD) and it has been a little bit of a learning curve. It is definitely faster, in MY opinion. Can't wait until a few issues are fixed and a release of a RTM :)
 

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  • Operating System
    Windows 11 21H2 22000.160
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    i 4790K
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    GA 97X G3
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    32gb
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    960
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    32 inch Phillips
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jimbo45

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Hi there
For the moment if you create a VM you can with some VM systems have sec boot / uefi, emulate a TPM in the VM's config and "jig the CPU topography" so it will install W11 from which you can get a REAL Hardware W11 system.

Emullated TPM works so even if you have a real one its simple in teh VM to use the emulated version before creating the real machine. You can use various VM systems - HYPER-V , KVM are two that work.

Here's the emulated TPM device working (in Windows in the settings choose install optional features and select TPMDIAGNOSTICS

Screenshot_20210917_114502.png


When you've done that the simplest way is then to (from WITHIN the VM is to :

1) ensure you have a copy of the iso of the build you want to install - I assume you've already got that as you must have created the VM in the first place.

2) attach a USB device to the VM as a "physical Disk" -- not a "Virtual hard disk and also have the iso image available in the VM (as a DATA image -- not as a mounted Virtual CD/DVD image..

3) In rufus click on the List USB devices and select your USB disk.

4) Browse the iso image in rufus

5) Now select "WindowstoGO". -- You can select the "Standard Windows installation but you'd then need to physically swap the HDD with an internal one after Rufus has done its work -- It's easier to stick with the WindowstoGo one and then convert to internal HDD after you are up and running.

6) when the process ends boot the USB and complete Windows install (on the real machine) .

7) You'll be missing a few drivers -- simply use a previous W11 or W10 disk or "Macrium image. Go down the relevant devices -->update driver-> browse computer and from your previous W10 / W11 image select folder windows->system32->Driverstore which will fix.

8) Now clone this system, to internal HDD

9) fix boot if required via Macrium "Fix Windows boot problems".

If the system has no TPM and Windows starts looking for it you are going to be hosed in any case -- however most systems even as far back as 2026 I believe had a TPM chip or built in TPM on their mobos. Should be enableable in the BIOS.

Why do this some ask :

Where a lot of machines fail the install test is in the CPU requirements - but some older and even recent CPU's are pretty good and fast -- there's no reason why these shouldn't run W11 for a forsseable time yet --it will be ages before any "New CPU" instructions will be built into the Windows kernels - there isn't a big enough user base to engineer tht sort of change in the kernel yet. So if you have a decent CPU and TPM and want to run W11 it's worth taking a little bit of time rather than rushing out replacing expensive decent hardware with even more expensive only marginally better hardware !!!!.


Cheers

Jimbo
 

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Steve C

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Hi there
For the moment if you create a VM you can with some VM systems have sec boot / uefi, emulate a TPM in the VM's config and "jig the CPU topography" so it will install W11 from which you can get a REAL Hardware W11 system.

Emullated TPM works so even if you have a real one its simple in teh VM to use the emulated version before creating the real machine. You can use various VM systems - HYPER-V , KVM are two that work.

Here's the emulated TPM device working (in Windows in the settings choose install optional features and select TPMDIAGNOSTICS

View attachment 8157


When you've done that the simplest way is then to (from WITHIN the VM is to :

1) ensure you have a copy of the iso of the build you want to install - I assume you've already got that as you must have created the VM in the first place.

2) attach a USB device to the VM as a "physical Disk" -- not a "Virtual hard disk and also have the iso image available in the VM (as a DATA image -- not as a mounted Virtual CD/DVD image..

3) In rufus click on the List USB devices and select your USB disk.

4) Browse the iso image in rufus

5) Now select "WindowstoGO". -- You can select the "Standard Windows installation but you'd then need to physically swap the HDD with an internal one after Rufus has done its work -- It's easier to stick with the WindowstoGo one and then convert to internal HDD after you are up and running.

6) when the process ends boot the USB and complete Windows install (on the real machine) .

7) You'll be missing a few drivers -- simply use a previous W11 or W10 disk or "Macrium image. Go down the relevant devices -->update driver-> browse computer and from your previous W10 / W11 image select folder windows->system32->Driverstore which will fix.

8) Now clone this system, to internal HDD

9) fix boot if required via Macrium "Fix Windows boot problems".

If the system has no TPM and Windows starts looking for it you are going to be hosed in any case -- however most systems even as far back as 2026 I believe had a TPM chip or built in TPM on their mobos. Should be enableable in the BIOS.

Why do this some ask :

Where a lot of machines fail the install test is in the CPU requirements - but some older and even recent CPU's are pretty good and fast -- there's no reason why these shouldn't run W11 for a forsseable time yet --it will be ages before any "New CPU" instructions will be built into the Windows kernels - there isn't a big enough user base to engineer tht sort of change in the kernel yet. So if you have a decent CPU and TPM and want to run W11 it's worth taking a little bit of time rather than rushing out replacing expensive decent hardware with even more expensive only marginally better hardware !!!!.


Cheers

Jimbo
I used this method which is simpler to install the Windows 11 developer version on my 7 year old Dell laptop which has no TPM support and has a non-compliant CPU:
  1. Installed W11 in Hyper V on my laptop having Windows 10 Pro
  2. Created a spare 30GB partition and cloned the Hyper V Windows 11 .vhdx file to that partition using Reflect
  3. Set the new W11 drive / partition as a boot menu option
  4. Booted to the W11 drive. W11 then installed all the laptop drivers needed.
  5. Activated the installation using the generic W10 key VK7JG-NPHTM-C97JM-9MPGT-3V66T. Windows then decided to activate the Windows 11 with a digital licence linked to my MS account.
I now have the PC dual booting Windows 10 and 11 fine and both versions are activated. I have no idea whether Windows 11 will keep working after the official release date.
 

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  • Operating System
    Windows 11 Pro
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    Laptop
    Manufacturer/Model
    Dell Inspiron 7537
    CPU
    Core i7 Mobile i7-4500U
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    Dell
    Memory
    8 GB
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cereberus

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I used this method which is simpler to install the Windows 11 developer version on my 7 year old Dell laptop which has no TPM support and has a non-compliant CPU:
  1. Installed W11 in Hyper V on my laptop having Windows 10 Pro
  2. Created a spare 30GB partition and cloned the Hyper V Windows 11 .vhdx file to that partition using Reflect
  3. Set the new W11 drive / partition as a boot menu option
  4. Booted to the W11 drive. W11 then installed all the laptop drivers needed.
  5. Activated the installation using the generic W10 key VK7JG-NPHTM-C97JM-9MPGT-3V66T. Windows then decided to activate the Windows 11 with a digital licence linked to my MS account.
I now have the PC dual booting Windows 10 and 11 fine and both versions are activated. I have no idea whether Windows 11 will keep working after the official release date.
A variation on this, to upgrade to W11 on unsupported pc, is to clone existing installation to a vhd including hidden partitions (vhd cannot be on a drive or partition being clone), then mount vhd on a hyper-V vm, then upgrade to W11 inside VM (TPM emulation on etc).

Once upgraded, closedown Hyper-V and mount vhd and create dial boot entry. This way you have updated host version to w11 and have all drivers.
 

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System One

  • Operating System
    Windows 10 Pro + others in VHDs
    Computer type
    Laptop
    Manufacturer/Model
    ASUS Vivobook 14
    CPU
    I7
    Motherboard
    Yep, Laptop has one.
    Memory
    16 GB
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    Integrated Intel Iris XE
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    Realtek built in
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    N/A
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    1920x1080
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    1 TB Optane NVME SSD, 1 TB NVME SSD
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    TPM 2.0

jimbo45

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A variation on this, to upgrade to W11 on unsupported pc, is to clone existing installation to a vhd including hidden partitions (vhd cannot be on a drive or partition being clone), then mount vhd on a hyper-V vm, then upgrade to W11 inside VM (TPM emulation on etc).

Once upgraded, closedown Hyper-V and mount vhd and create dial boot entry. This way you have updated host version to w11 and have all drivers.
Hi there

Booted an old version of W10 and followed above instructions -- also works a treat for those on Windows Hosts. !!

Interesting to see how long these "Work arounds" will continue to function. Actually mount the vhd and have it in the boot entry is a good idea --I'm going to see if this trick also works on a "WintoGo" system -- then one could have a tiny base Windows boot and run everything from the Windows system on the vhd .

Cheers
jimbo
 

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    Windows XP,7,10,11 Linux Arch Linux
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