Windows device security errors


retiredat44

Well-known member
Member
Local time
9:34 AM
Posts
129
Location
Oregon
OS
Win11
Windows11 device security errors just started recently, not in the past, same computer. It has to do with stopping attacks from entering through the memory. Controls freaks. Windows has gone crazy with security and nagging. Apparently, they want us to remove drivers if windows does not like them. You cannot go around this nuisance. A nag that won't stop. There is no way I am going to pull devices because windows has newer code always nagging about devices that didn't go into their programming by run amuck Windows coders. I say leave us alone! Already have Norton and Windows security, and just a home user. I tried a hack to change the registry and it worked, then a reboot or updated caused that to get changed and back to the nagging. The people writing the code make Windows worse as they just stuff it full of more nagging. They need to work on the basics and get out of our lives. IMHO
 

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    Win11
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop
    Manufacturer/Model
    Asus Home built
    CPU
    i9-13900
    Motherboard
    ASUS Strix Z90-H
    Memory
    64 GB
    Graphics Card(s)
    Nvidia RTX 2080-ti
    Monitor(s) Displays
    Sony 55"
    Hard Drives
    SSD
    PSU
    850 watt EVGA
    Case
    Cooler Master Haf 932
    Keyboard
    MS
    Mouse
    MS
    Internet Speed
    100/100
    Antivirus
    Norton 360
"It has to do with stopping attacks from entering through the memory".
Could you provide a screenshot of the errors?

I agree, device security has had alot of bugs after recent updates, but this sounds like it might be something else.
Are you referring to the blocked drivers list?
 

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    Windows 11
"It has to do with stopping attacks from entering through the memory".
Could you provide a screenshot of the errors?

I agree, device security has had alot of bugs after recent updates, but this sounds like it might be something else.
Are you referring to the blocked drivers list?
yes,, and those drivers are essential. so they are really beating a dead horse if they think we are going to chase down new drivers that they didn't include in their list.
 

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    Win11
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop
    Manufacturer/Model
    Asus Home built
    CPU
    i9-13900
    Motherboard
    ASUS Strix Z90-H
    Memory
    64 GB
    Graphics Card(s)
    Nvidia RTX 2080-ti
    Monitor(s) Displays
    Sony 55"
    Hard Drives
    SSD
    PSU
    850 watt EVGA
    Case
    Cooler Master Haf 932
    Keyboard
    MS
    Mouse
    MS
    Internet Speed
    100/100
    Antivirus
    Norton 360
yes,, and those drivers are essential. so they are really beating a dead horse if they think we are going to chase down new drivers that they didn't include in their list.
Indeed. And so many of the replacement drivers Windoze offers fail to function correctly. Evidently the work (or lack thereof) they engage in to test these drivers is incomplete. Perhaps Microsoft shouldn't have fired their beta testers. Seems with each "new" OS they release they get progressively (or regressively - is that a word?) sloppier. Is compatibility mode even a thing anymore?
 

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    WIN 11, WIN 10, WIN 8.1, WIN 7 U, WIN 7 PRO, WIN 7 HOME (32 Bit), LINUX MINT
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop
    Manufacturer/Model
    DIY, ASUS, and DELL
    CPU
    Intel i7 6900K (octocore) / AMD 3800X (8 core)
    Motherboard
    ASUS X99E-WS USB 3.1
    Memory
    128 GB CORSAIR DOMINATOR PLATINUM (B DIE)
    Graphics Card(s)
    NVIDIA 1070
    Sound Card
    Crystal Sound (onboard)
    Monitor(s) Displays
    single Samsung 30" 4K and 8" aux monitor
    Screen Resolution
    4K and something equally attrocious
    Hard Drives
    A, B, C, D, E, F, G, H, I, J, K, L, M, N, O, P, Q, R, S, T, U, V, W

    Ports X, Y, and Z are reserved for USB access and removable drives.

    Drive types consist of the following: Various mechanical hard drives bearing the brand names, Seagate, Toshiba, and Western Digital. Various NVMe drives bearing the brand names Kingston, Intel, Silicon Power, Crucial, Western Digital, and Team Group. Various SATA SSDs bearing various different brand names.

    RAID arrays included:

    LSI RAID 10 (WD Velociraptors) 1115.72 GB
    LSI RAID 10 (WD SSDS) 463.80 GB

    INTEL RAID 0 (KINGSTON HYPER X) System 447.14 GB
    INTEL RAID 1 TOSHIBA ENTERPRIZE class Data 2794.52 GB
    INTEL RAID 1 SEAGATE HYBRID 931.51 GB
    PSU
    SEVERAL. I prefer my Corsair Platinum HX1000i but I also like EVGA power supplies
    Case
    ThermalTake Level 10 GT (among others)
    Cooling
    Noctua is my favorite and I use it in my main. I also own various other coolers. Not a fan of liquid cooling.
    Keyboard
    all kinds.
    Mouse
    all kinds
    Internet Speed
    360 mbps - 1 gbps (depending)
    Browser
    FIREFOX
    Antivirus
    KASPERSKY (no apologies)
    Other Info
    I own too many laptops: A Dell touch screen with Windows 11 and 6 others (not counting the other four laptops I bought for this household.) Being a PC builder I own many desktop PCs as well. I am a father of five providing PCs, laptops, and tablets for all my family, most of which I have modified, rebuilt, or simply built from scratch. I do not own a cell phone, never have, never will.
It seems that you're experiencing challenges with the increased security measures and notifications in Windows 11. As you've mentioned, these changes might be causing some inconvenience, especially when you already have additional security software like Norton installed.

The enhanced security protocols and notifications are part of Microsoft's efforts to make Windows 11 safer and more secure. They aim to prevent security vulnerabilities and potential exploits, particularly those that might take advantage of system memory. However, I understand that these changes can sometimes feel overwhelming, especially when they seem to interfere with normal computer usage or result in persistent notifications.

If you're getting notifications about drivers, it's likely because Windows 11 is trying to ensure that all your drivers are up-to-date and compatible with the new security features. While it's generally a good idea to keep drivers updated for optimal performance and security, I understand that the constant notifications can be bothersome.

Unfortunately, making changes to the system registry to disable these notifications is generally not recommended, as it can potentially lead to instability or other issues. As you've experienced, these changes can also be overwritten by system updates.

I would recommend providing feedback to Microsoft about your experience. They often consider user feedback when making updates and changes to their software. You can do this through the "Feedback Hub" app that's included with Windows 11.

You might be able to find assistance from individuals in this forum who have encountered the same problem and can provide potential solutions.
 

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    Windows 11 Pro
It seems that you're experiencing challenges with the increased security measures and notifications in Windows 11. As you've mentioned, these changes might be causing some inconvenience, especially when you already have additional security software like Norton installed.

The enhanced security protocols and notifications are part of Microsoft's efforts to make Windows 11 safer and more secure. They aim to prevent security vulnerabilities and potential exploits, particularly those that might take advantage of system memory. However, I understand that these changes can sometimes feel overwhelming, especially when they seem to interfere with normal computer usage or result in persistent notifications.

If you're getting notifications about drivers, it's likely because Windows 11 is trying to ensure that all your drivers are up-to-date and compatible with the new security features. While it's generally a good idea to keep drivers updated for optimal performance and security, I understand that the constant notifications can be bothersome.

Unfortunately, making changes to the system registry to disable these notifications is generally not recommended, as it can potentially lead to instability or other issues. As you've experienced, these changes can also be overwritten by system updates.

I would recommend providing feedback to Microsoft about your experience. They often consider user feedback when making updates and changes to their software. You can do this through the "Feedback Hub" app that's included with Windows 11.

You might be able to find assistance from individuals in this forum who have encountered the same problem and can provide potential solutions.
Indeed. The authentic Microsoft forums can be of some assistance some times. I don't recommend calling support because support is pretty much at the level for people who are mostly computer illiterate IMO. It has been my personal finding that the recent protocols and upgrades generate more issues, potential exploits (such as root kits), and general instability than ever, except perhaps since the advent of Windows Vista. To be fair, once the majority of these were worked out Windows 7 eventually became a spectacular Operating System. Windows can thank their users for all that free beta testing. It is what it is.

With Windows 11 you can be sure to expect these issues with drivers aren't going away any time soon. This is largely due to the insistence of those investors in a Consortium that have spent hundreds of millions of dollars in the development of the Trusted Platform Module. Already, numerous incidents of stolen security keys has been the result of this... exploit? Doubtless the Consortium is working on it, throwing even more money at the abomination they birthed over a decade ago. In the meantime the user will simply have to roll with the punches. Even using a different operating system such as Linux won't help because TPM is an architectural design built into the EFI BIOS now. It is no longer optional on new system boards.

When appealing to the authentic Microsoft forums for help you might consider being careful about what third party programs you discuss there. They can be very sensitive about such things and I have been slapped on the wrist by them several times for suggesting the use of some of these third party programs as a member of the Microsoft Community. Occasionally, sound advice can be had there. Wishing Retiredat44 the very best.
 

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    WIN 11, WIN 10, WIN 8.1, WIN 7 U, WIN 7 PRO, WIN 7 HOME (32 Bit), LINUX MINT
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop
    Manufacturer/Model
    DIY, ASUS, and DELL
    CPU
    Intel i7 6900K (octocore) / AMD 3800X (8 core)
    Motherboard
    ASUS X99E-WS USB 3.1
    Memory
    128 GB CORSAIR DOMINATOR PLATINUM (B DIE)
    Graphics Card(s)
    NVIDIA 1070
    Sound Card
    Crystal Sound (onboard)
    Monitor(s) Displays
    single Samsung 30" 4K and 8" aux monitor
    Screen Resolution
    4K and something equally attrocious
    Hard Drives
    A, B, C, D, E, F, G, H, I, J, K, L, M, N, O, P, Q, R, S, T, U, V, W

    Ports X, Y, and Z are reserved for USB access and removable drives.

    Drive types consist of the following: Various mechanical hard drives bearing the brand names, Seagate, Toshiba, and Western Digital. Various NVMe drives bearing the brand names Kingston, Intel, Silicon Power, Crucial, Western Digital, and Team Group. Various SATA SSDs bearing various different brand names.

    RAID arrays included:

    LSI RAID 10 (WD Velociraptors) 1115.72 GB
    LSI RAID 10 (WD SSDS) 463.80 GB

    INTEL RAID 0 (KINGSTON HYPER X) System 447.14 GB
    INTEL RAID 1 TOSHIBA ENTERPRIZE class Data 2794.52 GB
    INTEL RAID 1 SEAGATE HYBRID 931.51 GB
    PSU
    SEVERAL. I prefer my Corsair Platinum HX1000i but I also like EVGA power supplies
    Case
    ThermalTake Level 10 GT (among others)
    Cooling
    Noctua is my favorite and I use it in my main. I also own various other coolers. Not a fan of liquid cooling.
    Keyboard
    all kinds.
    Mouse
    all kinds
    Internet Speed
    360 mbps - 1 gbps (depending)
    Browser
    FIREFOX
    Antivirus
    KASPERSKY (no apologies)
    Other Info
    I own too many laptops: A Dell touch screen with Windows 11 and 6 others (not counting the other four laptops I bought for this household.) Being a PC builder I own many desktop PCs as well. I am a father of five providing PCs, laptops, and tablets for all my family, most of which I have modified, rebuilt, or simply built from scratch. I do not own a cell phone, never have, never will.
Indeed. The authentic Microsoft forums can be of some assistance some times. I don't recommend calling support because support is pretty much at the level for people who are mostly computer illiterate IMO. It has been my personal finding that the recent protocols and upgrades generate more issues, potential exploits (such as root kits), and general instability than ever, except perhaps since the advent of Windows Vista. To be fair, once the majority of these were worked out Windows 7 eventually became a spectacular Operating System. Windows can thank their users for all that free beta testing. It is what it is.

With Windows 11 you can be sure to expect these issues with drivers aren't going away any time soon. This is largely due to the insistence of those investors in a Consortium that have spent hundreds of millions of dollars in the development of the Trusted Platform Module. Already, numerous incidents of stolen security keys has been the result of this... exploit? Doubtless the Consortium is working on it, throwing even more money at the abomination they birthed over a decade ago. In the meantime the user will simply have to roll with the punches. Even using a different operating system such as Linux won't help because TPM is an architectural design built into the EFI BIOS now. It is no longer optional on new system boards.

When appealing to the authentic Microsoft forums for help you might consider being careful about what third party programs you discuss there. They can be very sensitive about such things and I have been slapped on the wrist by them several times for suggesting the use of some of these third party programs as a member of the Microsoft Community. Occasionally, sound advice can be had there. Wishing Retiredat44 the very best.
It seems that you've made some insightful observations. One can certainly understand the frustration that these ongoing issues with Windows 11, particularly related to driver compatibility and the Trusted Platform Module (TPM), can cause. Your points about the unintended consequences of these security measures, such as the potential for exploits and system instability, are indeed valid.



Looking back at the journey from Windows Vista to Windows 7, Microsoft can take user feedback into account and improve their products significantly over time. It is reasonable to expect a similar process to occur with Windows 11, with patches and updates gradually resolving the prominent issues users are encountering.



The insight you have provided into the deeper implications of TPM, including the issue of stolen security keys and the fact that TPM is now a fundamental part of the EFI BIOS architecture, adds an interesting perspective. These factors introduce a new set of challenges and concerns for both users and developers, and careful consideration and continuous efforts will be needed to address these issues.



With regards to Microsoft forums, your caution about discussing third-party programs is appreciated. Forum rules and guidelines should always be respected, and it is always helpful to remind users about this. Despite these limitations, the forums can still serve as valuable platforms to share experiences and discover potential solutions, if discussions still are within the set boundaries.



Your insights are appreciated and will certainly contribute to ongoing discussions to assist others facing similar challenges.
 

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    Windows 11 Pro
I updated to a new Asus Strix 790-H and Intel i9-13900K. So no more of the issues with Win11.
 

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    Win11
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop
    Manufacturer/Model
    Asus Home built
    CPU
    i9-13900
    Motherboard
    ASUS Strix Z90-H
    Memory
    64 GB
    Graphics Card(s)
    Nvidia RTX 2080-ti
    Monitor(s) Displays
    Sony 55"
    Hard Drives
    SSD
    PSU
    850 watt EVGA
    Case
    Cooler Master Haf 932
    Keyboard
    MS
    Mouse
    MS
    Internet Speed
    100/100
    Antivirus
    Norton 360
I updated to a new Asus Strix 790-H and Intel i9-13900K. So no more of the issues with Win11.
Probably your best option (and likely the most expensive). I'm still struggling with issues, myself. I'm too old and stubborn to be shelling out a couple thousand for a new system board and then who knows how much for 128 GB of DDR5 system RAM and all the rest that goes along with it just because Windows 11 insists on using TPM2. I've always had a personal policy about upgrading my own PC: It has to be better than what I was using previously. Replacing this rig would like me run me about 7K before I could get anything going that even looked like sensible competition and even then I'd really have to look at how much bandwidth I'd be getting, whether or not I could run all the various RAID arrays I enjoy so much on this build, how to get a max temp of 42 C under a regular work load on air cooling, while at least running a mild OC that takes me well beyond 4 GHz. AMD has nothing that will do that for me but I did come close in many ways with my last AMD build so I'm not dissing AMD. Just the thought of replacing all this Intel based hardware makes me shudder. I can't exactly just go and buy outright what this system can do. No, I have to build it.
I ain't got no time for that! 😄
 

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    WIN 11, WIN 10, WIN 8.1, WIN 7 U, WIN 7 PRO, WIN 7 HOME (32 Bit), LINUX MINT
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop
    Manufacturer/Model
    DIY, ASUS, and DELL
    CPU
    Intel i7 6900K (octocore) / AMD 3800X (8 core)
    Motherboard
    ASUS X99E-WS USB 3.1
    Memory
    128 GB CORSAIR DOMINATOR PLATINUM (B DIE)
    Graphics Card(s)
    NVIDIA 1070
    Sound Card
    Crystal Sound (onboard)
    Monitor(s) Displays
    single Samsung 30" 4K and 8" aux monitor
    Screen Resolution
    4K and something equally attrocious
    Hard Drives
    A, B, C, D, E, F, G, H, I, J, K, L, M, N, O, P, Q, R, S, T, U, V, W

    Ports X, Y, and Z are reserved for USB access and removable drives.

    Drive types consist of the following: Various mechanical hard drives bearing the brand names, Seagate, Toshiba, and Western Digital. Various NVMe drives bearing the brand names Kingston, Intel, Silicon Power, Crucial, Western Digital, and Team Group. Various SATA SSDs bearing various different brand names.

    RAID arrays included:

    LSI RAID 10 (WD Velociraptors) 1115.72 GB
    LSI RAID 10 (WD SSDS) 463.80 GB

    INTEL RAID 0 (KINGSTON HYPER X) System 447.14 GB
    INTEL RAID 1 TOSHIBA ENTERPRIZE class Data 2794.52 GB
    INTEL RAID 1 SEAGATE HYBRID 931.51 GB
    PSU
    SEVERAL. I prefer my Corsair Platinum HX1000i but I also like EVGA power supplies
    Case
    ThermalTake Level 10 GT (among others)
    Cooling
    Noctua is my favorite and I use it in my main. I also own various other coolers. Not a fan of liquid cooling.
    Keyboard
    all kinds.
    Mouse
    all kinds
    Internet Speed
    360 mbps - 1 gbps (depending)
    Browser
    FIREFOX
    Antivirus
    KASPERSKY (no apologies)
    Other Info
    I own too many laptops: A Dell touch screen with Windows 11 and 6 others (not counting the other four laptops I bought for this household.) Being a PC builder I own many desktop PCs as well. I am a father of five providing PCs, laptops, and tablets for all my family, most of which I have modified, rebuilt, or simply built from scratch. I do not own a cell phone, never have, never will.
Probably your best option (and likely the most expensive). I'm still struggling with issues, myself. I'm too old and stubborn to be shelling out a couple thousand for a new system board and then who knows how much for 128 GB of DDR5 system RAM and all the rest that goes along with it just because Windows 11 insists on using TPM2. I've always had a personal policy about upgrading my own PC: It has to be better than what I was using previously. Replacing this rig would like me run me about 7K before I could get anything going that even looked like sensible competition and even then I'd really have to look at how much bandwidth I'd be getting, whether or not I could run all the various RAID arrays I enjoy so much on this build, how to get a max temp of 42 C under a regular work load on air cooling, while at least running a mild OC that takes me well beyond 4 GHz. AMD has nothing that will do that for me but I did come close in many ways with my last AMD build so I'm not dissing AMD. Just the thought of replacing all this Intel based hardware makes me shudder. I can't exactly just go and buy outright what this system can do. No, I have to build it.
I ain't got no time for that! 😄

It sounds like you've put a lot of time, effort, and resources into your current system, and it's completely understandable that you're hesitant to overhaul everything for Windows 11.

If TPM 2.0 and the other system requirements for Windows 11 are the only issues, you might want to consider staying with Windows 10 for now. Microsoft has committed to supporting it until at least October 14, 2025. This could give you a couple more years of life out of your current build.
 

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    Windows 11 Pro
It sounds like you've put a lot of time, effort, and resources into your current system, and it's completely understandable that you're hesitant to overhaul everything for Windows 11.

If TPM 2.0 and the other system requirements for Windows 11 are the only issues, you might want to consider staying with Windows 10 for now. Microsoft has committed to supporting it until at least October 14, 2025. This could give you a couple more years of life out of your current build.

Thank you for your kind observation, windoc. I could, theoretically, build another PC like it just on the cost of the peripherals, so yes, there is a considerable amount invested in this PC — well over ten thousand for sure. That may not seem like much money to some but I'm semi-retired, on a fixed income, soon to be forced into retirement and I still have three daughters to think of under my care. Nobody said life was fair, eh? But it sure can be one wild & crazy field trip! :p Not complaining — only explaining.

Some of the cats in this forum are just starting. They haven't owned hundreds of computers yet. The thrill of getting a new PC is still fresh for them, so the quick and obvious solution is to simply buy another. I recall being like that. Then I moved on to building. These days, building doesn't really give you a whole lot of financial advantage in terms of material costs, but it does give you a bit more control over what goes into your PC. It's nice to be able to control the quality of the hardware that one puts into one's PC.

IF TPM2 were simply a matter of plugging a tiny little key into my TPM 1.2 port on the system board to convert it (as some have suggested) I would not hesitate. Alas, from what I've researched, Microsoft doesn't fully acknowledge these quick "conversions" either. Tom's Hardware forum makes it explicitly clear that this is a waste of time and resources. Others have said that it can seriously mess up your entire system and I have little reason to believe this should not be the case.

Do I have time for this? Short answer: No.

I'm typing this to you on another one of my many, many PCs. This is an AMD build. It "qualifies" for a Win 11 OS but it doesn't have it because the upgrade was so horrifyingly disastrous that I had to call Microsoft SUPPORT to "fix" it. Of course, Microsoft was utterly useless and it quickly occurred to me that I knew more about the OS than their tech support did. I had to reinstall Win 10. So much for the Microsoft nagging system check that kept reminding me that my PC qualified for Win 11. I figure if their fat cat company can keep nagging me about how my PC qualifies for Win 11 they had better have KNOWLEDGEABLE, SKILLED TECHNICIANS, capable of helping me with my problem when their bogus claims of compatibility go sideways. No, they have to do better than, "I'm sorry sir. You'll have to reinstall the operating system."

After I finish typing this I will continue with my Win 10 updates (because some here have suggested I haven't learned my lesson yet) and switch back (via KVM) to my good ole, solid, reliable Window 7 Ultimate on the Work Station we were discussing. My hardware firewall and my own security protocols seem to serve well enough for me not to need TPM2 on that build. No, not at all, not ever. Frankly, TPM is about as useful as teats on a bull and Microsoft has spent a decade now proving it. Why ever would I want to install a problematic operating system like Windows 10 on my Work Station? Isn't it bad enough that my GENUINE CERTIFIED copy of Windows 11 using my genuine certified Windows license key which I so graciously paid for at the WINDOZE STORE won't even allow me to keep running LINUX in secure boot on the same system board that was in fact designed for multi-booting?? No, not ethical. In fact, very sloppy. This is the exact sort of thing Jody, a man I admire and respect, despite his whiny and annoying voice, has been trying to warn us about and it's going over people's heads like water over a ducks back.

Thank you for your time, Doc. (You don't mind if I call you Doc, do you?) Perhaps in the future, Microsoft will provide large language AGI shrinks with each OS for their clients to vent to. Perhaps this will be a Windows 12 feature.

For those of you who missed it:

 

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    WIN 11, WIN 10, WIN 8.1, WIN 7 U, WIN 7 PRO, WIN 7 HOME (32 Bit), LINUX MINT
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop
    Manufacturer/Model
    DIY, ASUS, and DELL
    CPU
    Intel i7 6900K (octocore) / AMD 3800X (8 core)
    Motherboard
    ASUS X99E-WS USB 3.1
    Memory
    128 GB CORSAIR DOMINATOR PLATINUM (B DIE)
    Graphics Card(s)
    NVIDIA 1070
    Sound Card
    Crystal Sound (onboard)
    Monitor(s) Displays
    single Samsung 30" 4K and 8" aux monitor
    Screen Resolution
    4K and something equally attrocious
    Hard Drives
    A, B, C, D, E, F, G, H, I, J, K, L, M, N, O, P, Q, R, S, T, U, V, W

    Ports X, Y, and Z are reserved for USB access and removable drives.

    Drive types consist of the following: Various mechanical hard drives bearing the brand names, Seagate, Toshiba, and Western Digital. Various NVMe drives bearing the brand names Kingston, Intel, Silicon Power, Crucial, Western Digital, and Team Group. Various SATA SSDs bearing various different brand names.

    RAID arrays included:

    LSI RAID 10 (WD Velociraptors) 1115.72 GB
    LSI RAID 10 (WD SSDS) 463.80 GB

    INTEL RAID 0 (KINGSTON HYPER X) System 447.14 GB
    INTEL RAID 1 TOSHIBA ENTERPRIZE class Data 2794.52 GB
    INTEL RAID 1 SEAGATE HYBRID 931.51 GB
    PSU
    SEVERAL. I prefer my Corsair Platinum HX1000i but I also like EVGA power supplies
    Case
    ThermalTake Level 10 GT (among others)
    Cooling
    Noctua is my favorite and I use it in my main. I also own various other coolers. Not a fan of liquid cooling.
    Keyboard
    all kinds.
    Mouse
    all kinds
    Internet Speed
    360 mbps - 1 gbps (depending)
    Browser
    FIREFOX
    Antivirus
    KASPERSKY (no apologies)
    Other Info
    I own too many laptops: A Dell touch screen with Windows 11 and 6 others (not counting the other four laptops I bought for this household.) Being a PC builder I own many desktop PCs as well. I am a father of five providing PCs, laptops, and tablets for all my family, most of which I have modified, rebuilt, or simply built from scratch. I do not own a cell phone, never have, never will.
Thank you for your kind observation, windoc. I could, theoretically, build another PC like it just on the cost of the peripherals, so yes, there is a considerable amount invested in this PC — well over ten thousand for sure. That may not seem like much money to some but I'm semi-retired, on a fixed income, soon to be forced into retirement and I still have three daughters to think of under my care. Nobody said life was fair, eh? But it sure can be one wild & crazy field trip! :p Not complaining — only explaining.

Some of the cats in this forum are just starting. They haven't owned hundreds of computers yet. The thrill of getting a new PC is still fresh for them, so the quick and obvious solution is to simply buy another. I recall being like that. Then I moved on to building. These days, building doesn't really give you a whole lot of financial advantage in terms of material costs, but it does give you a bit more control over what goes into your PC. It's nice to be able to control the quality of the hardware that one puts into one's PC.

IF TPM2 were simply a matter of plugging a tiny little key into my TPM 1.2 port on the system board to convert it (as some have suggested) I would not hesitate. Alas, from what I've researched, Microsoft doesn't fully acknowledge these quick "conversions" either. Tom's Hardware forum makes it explicitly clear that this is a waste of time and resources. Others have said that it can seriously mess up your entire system and I have little reason to believe this should not be the case.

Do I have time for this? Short answer: No.

I'm typing this to you on another one of my many, many PCs. This is an AMD build. It "qualifies" for a Win 11 OS but it doesn't have it because the upgrade was so horrifyingly disastrous that I had to call Microsoft SUPPORT to "fix" it. Of course, Microsoft was utterly useless and it quickly occurred to me that I knew more about the OS than their tech support did. I had to reinstall Win 10. So much for the Microsoft nagging system check that kept reminding me that my PC qualified for Win 11. I figure if their fat cat company can keep nagging me about how my PC qualifies for Win 11 they had better have KNOWLEDGEABLE, SKILLED TECHNICIANS, capable of helping me with my problem when their bogus claims of compatibility go sideways. No, they have to do better than, "I'm sorry sir. You'll have to reinstall the operating system."

After I finish typing this I will continue with my Win 10 updates (because some here have suggested I haven't learned my lesson yet) and switch back (via KVM) to my good ole, solid, reliable Window 7 Ultimate on the Work Station we were discussing. My hardware firewall and my own security protocols seem to serve well enough for me not to need TPM2 on that build. No, not at all, not ever. Frankly, TPM is about as useful as teats on a bull and Microsoft has spent a decade now proving it. Why ever would I want to install a problematic operating system like Windows 10 on my Work Station? Isn't it bad enough that my GENUINE CERTIFIED copy of Windows 11 using my genuine certified Windows license key which I so graciously paid for at the WINDOZE STORE won't even allow me to keep running LINUX in secure boot on the same system board that was in fact designed for multi-booting?? No, not ethical. In fact, very sloppy. This is the exact sort of thing Jody, a man I admire and respect, despite his whiny and annoying voice, has been trying to warn us about and it's going over people's heads like water over a ducks back.

Thank you for your time, Doc. (You don't mind if I call you Doc, do you?) Perhaps in the future, Microsoft will provide large language AGI shrinks with each OS for their clients to vent to. Perhaps this will be a Windows 12 feature.

For those of you who missed it:


Hello,

I can sense the frustration in your words, and I completely understand. You've invested not only money but also time and effort in building and maintaining your systems. Your dissatisfaction with Microsoft's support services is also valid. It can be especially challenging when you feel you know more than the technician helping you!

Your comment about Microsoft potentially needing AGI shrinks for each OS made me laugh. I guess that's where we, as a community, come in. We might not be large language AGI shrinks, but we're here to support each other.

Given your experience and circumstances, I would suggest exploring Linux distributions if you haven't already done so. They can be more customizable and flexible in terms of hardware requirements, which might fit well with your machines. Some, like Ubuntu, have strong support communities which could help with any problems that come up.

I understand your need for RAID support and overclocking, and there are Linux distros that handle these well. I am not sure what your specific needs are for your machines, but there might be options that work well for you.

If you're concerned about software compatibility, running a Windows VM within Linux might be a solution. This can be particularly helpful for software that doesn't have a Linux equivalent, and it might give you the security and freedom of Linux with the compatibility of Windows.

Regarding TPM, it's a tough spot to be in. In an ideal world, upgrades like these would be backwards compatible or offer a simple, inexpensive upgrade path. It's unfortunate this isn't always the case.
 

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    Windows 11 Pro
Thanks, Doc. I guess I just needed to vent a little. lol
 

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    WIN 11, WIN 10, WIN 8.1, WIN 7 U, WIN 7 PRO, WIN 7 HOME (32 Bit), LINUX MINT
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop
    Manufacturer/Model
    DIY, ASUS, and DELL
    CPU
    Intel i7 6900K (octocore) / AMD 3800X (8 core)
    Motherboard
    ASUS X99E-WS USB 3.1
    Memory
    128 GB CORSAIR DOMINATOR PLATINUM (B DIE)
    Graphics Card(s)
    NVIDIA 1070
    Sound Card
    Crystal Sound (onboard)
    Monitor(s) Displays
    single Samsung 30" 4K and 8" aux monitor
    Screen Resolution
    4K and something equally attrocious
    Hard Drives
    A, B, C, D, E, F, G, H, I, J, K, L, M, N, O, P, Q, R, S, T, U, V, W

    Ports X, Y, and Z are reserved for USB access and removable drives.

    Drive types consist of the following: Various mechanical hard drives bearing the brand names, Seagate, Toshiba, and Western Digital. Various NVMe drives bearing the brand names Kingston, Intel, Silicon Power, Crucial, Western Digital, and Team Group. Various SATA SSDs bearing various different brand names.

    RAID arrays included:

    LSI RAID 10 (WD Velociraptors) 1115.72 GB
    LSI RAID 10 (WD SSDS) 463.80 GB

    INTEL RAID 0 (KINGSTON HYPER X) System 447.14 GB
    INTEL RAID 1 TOSHIBA ENTERPRIZE class Data 2794.52 GB
    INTEL RAID 1 SEAGATE HYBRID 931.51 GB
    PSU
    SEVERAL. I prefer my Corsair Platinum HX1000i but I also like EVGA power supplies
    Case
    ThermalTake Level 10 GT (among others)
    Cooling
    Noctua is my favorite and I use it in my main. I also own various other coolers. Not a fan of liquid cooling.
    Keyboard
    all kinds.
    Mouse
    all kinds
    Internet Speed
    360 mbps - 1 gbps (depending)
    Browser
    FIREFOX
    Antivirus
    KASPERSKY (no apologies)
    Other Info
    I own too many laptops: A Dell touch screen with Windows 11 and 6 others (not counting the other four laptops I bought for this household.) Being a PC builder I own many desktop PCs as well. I am a father of five providing PCs, laptops, and tablets for all my family, most of which I have modified, rebuilt, or simply built from scratch. I do not own a cell phone, never have, never will.
if I didn't game, I would go with linux.. I think it does everything, but it isn't really easy, a lot of old dos windows type commands.. with a gui.. but if you keep it basic, it will do everything and the software is free for home users. For those that didn't grow up working with computers and never learned.. not sure you can catch up... sorry... you have to learn the basics to use one at home, and not call for help. I would hate to pay to have people get my computer working..
 

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    Win11
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop
    Manufacturer/Model
    Asus Home built
    CPU
    i9-13900
    Motherboard
    ASUS Strix Z90-H
    Memory
    64 GB
    Graphics Card(s)
    Nvidia RTX 2080-ti
    Monitor(s) Displays
    Sony 55"
    Hard Drives
    SSD
    PSU
    850 watt EVGA
    Case
    Cooler Master Haf 932
    Keyboard
    MS
    Mouse
    MS
    Internet Speed
    100/100
    Antivirus
    Norton 360
if I didn't game, I would go with linux.. I think it does everything, but it isn't really easy, a lot of old dos windows type commands.. with a gui.. but if you keep it basic, it will do everything and the software is free for home users. For those that didn't grow up working with computers and never learned.. not sure you can catch up... sorry... you have to learn the basics to use one at home, and not call for help. I would hate to pay to have people get my computer working..
The good thing is that there are enough "how to" videos online for noobs like myself to learn. I barely looked sideways at a computer until the turn of the millennium. In many ways I caught on fast but I had the unfair advantage of the Windows Wizards. Before that I only dabbled a bit on Tandy and Commodore 64. My son actually taught me how to use Windows. Good thing I had some typing skill before then.

I like the idea of having both. I wouldn't mind having a couple more if they were reliable enough. Qubes looked promising but I never could get the system to work online. I want to keep using Windows but it looks like I'll be simply have to settle for the good ole versions of the past and let the chips fall where they may. If I have to constantly alter my UEFI just to boot from one OS to another then the OS that insists on making me do that is just going to have to go. I don't have time for that nonsense.

I have a friend who actually signed "divorce" papers and received a settlement from Microsoft because he refused to play by her rules. Seriously, it's like a marriage. He refused the EULA and didn't want Windows on his PC anymore. Then he demanded a refund. He got a pittance. It's really quite laughable. So, I call myself a polygamist because I like to "game" on many OS. Few know that the name of the word "game" came from the word "gamy". The word literally means marriage. :cool: Trivia can be amazing.
 

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    WIN 11, WIN 10, WIN 8.1, WIN 7 U, WIN 7 PRO, WIN 7 HOME (32 Bit), LINUX MINT
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop
    Manufacturer/Model
    DIY, ASUS, and DELL
    CPU
    Intel i7 6900K (octocore) / AMD 3800X (8 core)
    Motherboard
    ASUS X99E-WS USB 3.1
    Memory
    128 GB CORSAIR DOMINATOR PLATINUM (B DIE)
    Graphics Card(s)
    NVIDIA 1070
    Sound Card
    Crystal Sound (onboard)
    Monitor(s) Displays
    single Samsung 30" 4K and 8" aux monitor
    Screen Resolution
    4K and something equally attrocious
    Hard Drives
    A, B, C, D, E, F, G, H, I, J, K, L, M, N, O, P, Q, R, S, T, U, V, W

    Ports X, Y, and Z are reserved for USB access and removable drives.

    Drive types consist of the following: Various mechanical hard drives bearing the brand names, Seagate, Toshiba, and Western Digital. Various NVMe drives bearing the brand names Kingston, Intel, Silicon Power, Crucial, Western Digital, and Team Group. Various SATA SSDs bearing various different brand names.

    RAID arrays included:

    LSI RAID 10 (WD Velociraptors) 1115.72 GB
    LSI RAID 10 (WD SSDS) 463.80 GB

    INTEL RAID 0 (KINGSTON HYPER X) System 447.14 GB
    INTEL RAID 1 TOSHIBA ENTERPRIZE class Data 2794.52 GB
    INTEL RAID 1 SEAGATE HYBRID 931.51 GB
    PSU
    SEVERAL. I prefer my Corsair Platinum HX1000i but I also like EVGA power supplies
    Case
    ThermalTake Level 10 GT (among others)
    Cooling
    Noctua is my favorite and I use it in my main. I also own various other coolers. Not a fan of liquid cooling.
    Keyboard
    all kinds.
    Mouse
    all kinds
    Internet Speed
    360 mbps - 1 gbps (depending)
    Browser
    FIREFOX
    Antivirus
    KASPERSKY (no apologies)
    Other Info
    I own too many laptops: A Dell touch screen with Windows 11 and 6 others (not counting the other four laptops I bought for this household.) Being a PC builder I own many desktop PCs as well. I am a father of five providing PCs, laptops, and tablets for all my family, most of which I have modified, rebuilt, or simply built from scratch. I do not own a cell phone, never have, never will.
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