Time and Language Add or Remove Keyboard Layout for Input Language in Windows 11


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Keyboard_layout_banner.png

In Windows, you can change your keyboard layout to type in another language or input method you want to use..

The language of your keyboard layout controls the characters that appear on your screen when you type. By using the different layouts, you can type all the characters for the language, including diacritics such as the umlaut (ä) in German and the tilde (ñ) in Spanish.

When you add a language, the default keyboard layout for the language will be installed by default.

You can install additional keyboards for language-specific key layouts and input options. Adding an input language lets you set a language-preference order for websites and apps, as well as change your keyboard language.

When you have more than one language and/or keyboard layout installed, you can change your keyboard layout via the Language Bar or press the Win + Spacebar keys to cycle through all your installed keyboards.

See also:

This tutorial will show you how to add or remove a keyboard layout for input language for your account in Windows 11.


Contents



EXAMPLE: Language Bar on taskbar

Language_Bar.png





Option One

Add Keyboard Layout in Settings


1 Open Settings (Win+I).

2 Click/tap on Time & language on the left side, and click/tap on Language & region on the right side. (see screenshot below)

Keyboard_layout_Settings-1.png

3 Under Preferred languages, click/tap on the Options (3 dots) button for the language (ex: "English (United States") you want to add a keyboard for, and click/tap on Language options. (see screenshot below)

Keyboard_layout_Settings-2.png


4 Under Keyboards, click/tap on the Add a keyboard button to the right of Installed keyboards. (see screenshot below)

Keyboard_layout_Settings-3.png

5 Select the keyboard (ex: "United Kingdom") you want to add. (see screenshot below)

If you do not see the keyboard you want, you may have to add a new language to get additional options.


Keyboard_layout_Settings-4.png

6 You can now close Settings if you like.




Option Two

Remove Keyboard Layout in Settings


1 Open Settings (Win+I).

2 Click/tap on Time & language on the left side, and click/tap on Language & region on the right side. (see screenshot below)

Keyboard_layout_Settings-1.png

3 Under Preferred languages, click/tap on the Options (3 dots) button for the language (ex: "English (United States") you want to remove a keyboard for, and click/tap on Language options. (see screenshot below)

Keyboard_layout_Settings-2.png


4 Under Keyboards, click/tap on the Options (3 dots) button for the keyboard (ex: "United Kingdom") you want to uninstall, and click/tap on Remove. (see screenshot below)

Remove_keyboard_layout_Settings.png

5 You can now close Settings if you like.


That's it,
Shawn Brink


 

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Slavic

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Windows 11 Pro; Windows 8.1 Pro
Sometimes the keyboard layouts may be added by software, even silently and against user consent.

One of most prominent (and infamous, from my point) example is the MMO game Guild Wars 2. Unlike many other video games, its keyboard commands may work only basing on standard QWERTY US keyboard; if the user doesn't have such (I, for example, prefer United States-International keyboard, where input the accented character is easier than in US; but the same is for any other layout), then the game adds US layout forcefully, uses it for keyboard commands, and it remains active after exit, being visible in the keyboard switcher. I tried to understand the origin of this and found out that developers use Win32 API function LoadKeyboardLayoutA to add US keyboard, but forget to call API UnloadKeyboardLayout to remove it before exit, if it didn't present in the system initially. It's a result of poor qualification of system-level programmers in ArenaNet... Removing excessive keyboard in Settings or Control Panel is possible, but tedious, better to use a script.

I used this script initially in Windows 8.1, it still works in Windows 11. Need two files, command and XML (location doesn't matter):
Remove_en-US.cmd
Code:
control intl.cpl,, /f:"%CD%\Remove_en-US.xml"
Remove_en-US.xml
XML:
<gs:GlobalizationServices xmlns:gs="urn:longhornGlobalizationUnattend">
    <!--User List-->
    <gs:UserList>
        <gs:User UserID="Current"/>
    </gs:UserList>
    <!--input preferences-->
    <gs:InputPreferences>
        <!--add en-US keyboard input-->
        <gs:InputLanguageID Action="add" ID="0409:00000409"/>
        <!--remove en-US keyboard input-->
        <gs:InputLanguageID Action="remove" ID="0409:00000409"/>
    </gs:InputPreferences>
</gs:GlobalizationServices>
It adds and then removes the particular layout: without adding the layout first it will not be properly removed. ID 0409:00000409 is the input profile with language code and keyboard code; for example, United States-International will be 0409:00020409. Other combinations can be found here: Default Input Profiles (Input Locales) in Windows.
 

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