Keep access to VM when logged off HOST - VMWare / VBOX

jimbo45

Well-known member
Member
VIP
Local time
9:34 PM
Posts
646
Location
Hafnarfjörður IS
Hi folks
HYPER-V and KVM systems still allow access to VM's when the main user is logged out of the Host -- I have some users who don't have an account on the Host but have accounts on VM's -- anyway to ensure that VM's created with VBOX or VMWARE can still run in background and be accessible even when the main HOST user has logged out of the Host system.

I believe anyway KVM VM's can run automatically from boot as can HYPER-V VM's so nobody needs to be logged on to the HOST to start required VM's so a normal boot should enable all the required VM's by just "auto starting" them.

These VM's are accessed remotely from the users own laptops.

Cheers
jimbo
 

My Computer

System One

  • Operating System
    Windows XP,7,10,11 Linux Arch Linux
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop
    CPU
    2 X Intel i7

hsehestedt

Well-known member
Member
VIP
Local time
4:34 PM
Posts
287
Location
Texas, USA
Jimbo, I worked out some procedures to allow VMware VMs to be run without having to logon and to continue to run when the user logs off.

Currently, VMware has functionality built-in called "Shared VMs" that allows for this. However, VMware has announced that after version 16.x this feature will no longer be available. So the steps below are a workaround to allow standard VMware VMs to start without a user having to logon and to remain running after a user logs out.

I hope this helps someone! I worked this out because

1) I'm not a fan of Hyper-V (won't get into reasons now)
2) I wanted to have a Plex Server start automatically within a VM without ever having to logon to my system.

Okay, enough said. Here is the procedure:

I would have to verify this, but it is possible that the ability to suspend the VM upon shutdown / reboot may require Win 10 Pro, not Home because it will require a Group Policy and I think that Home has no Group Policy editor. I may be wrong on that point. However, you can still start the VM(s) without having to logon.

VMware workstation had a feature called "Shared VMs" that allowed a VM to run without a user needing to logon to Windows. VMware has announced that this feature is deprecated and will no longer be available after VMware Workstation 16.x. However, I have a procedure that will still allow you to run VMs without the need to logon.

NOTE: Be aware that this procedure will start the VM with no GUI. As a result, you will want to make sure that the VM is configured to allow access via remote desktop so that you can connect that way. In addition, you may want to set your VM to autologon so that any programs you want to run within the VM can launch at startup. For example, this is the procedure you would want to follow for a Plex Server VM. Note that this applies only to the VM. You do NOT need to logon to the host system to allow the VM to run.

Verify the location of VMware Workstation. By default, it is located here:

C:\Program Files (x86)\VMware\VMware Workstation

Within that folder you should find the vmrun.exe file.

Now, locate the path to the .vmx file for the VM that you want to automatically run.

Example: "D:\VMware Virtual Machines\Windows 10 21H1 Clean Install Test Platform\Windows 10 21H1 Clean Install Test Platform.vmx"

Create a batch file that looks like this (modify the paths as necessary):

"C:\Program Files (x86)\VMware\VMware Workstation\vmrun.exe" start "D:\VMware Virtual Machines\Windows 10 21H1 Clean Install Test Platform\Windows 10 21H1 Clean Install Test Platform.vmx" nogui

Option 1: This will run the VM upon logon.

Open Run and type "Shell:Common Startup"
Drag and drop the batch file that you created into this location. Click Continue to allow the batch file to be run as Administrator.

Option 2: This will run the VM without the need to logon.

Run the task scheduler, right-click Task Scheduler Library, select Create Task.
Give a name to the task, choose Run whether user is logged in or not, configure for Windows 10.
On the Triggers tab, select New... begin the task at startup. Make sure that the Enabled checkbox is checked.
On the Actions tab, select New... > Start a Program should be selected for the action. For Program/Script specify the full path and file name of the batch file.

Example: "C:\Scripts\Autostart VM.bat"

Click on OK, then OK again and enter your credentials.

--------------------
To suspend the VM when the host is shutdown

Setup another batch file on the host with a command in it like the one below. Modify the paths as necessary:

"C:\Program Files (x86)\VMware\VMware Workstation\vmrun.exe" suspend "D:\VMware Virtual Machines\Windows 10 21H1 Clean Install Test Platform\Windows 10 21H1 Clean Install Test Platform.vmx"

Then set it run when the host shuts down by placing the batch file in "C:\WINDOWS\system32\GroupPolicy\Machine\Scripts\Shutdown". Open the Group Policy editor "gpedit.msc" and then in "Computer Configuration - Windows Settings - Scripts" add your batch file to the shut down script option.
--------------------
Additional Information

If you don't want to access your VM via Remote Desktop, you can gain access to it via the VMware GUI by doing this:

1) From the VMware GUI, select the VM in question (you won't see a GUI, so just click within the space where it would normally appear) and press CTRL-J to suspend it.
2) Once suspended, press CTRL-B to resume the VM.

Result: The VM is now visible.

IMPORTANT: Once making the GUI for the VM visible, if you logout the VM will be suspended so you will need to lock the system rather than logging out if you want it to remain running. If you do not make the VM visible, it will continue to run even when you logoff.

3) When done, make sure to close the VM GUI. A warning will be displayed indicating that some VMs are still powered on. Choose "Run in Background". If you don't do this, the VM will not be suspended cleanly when you physically shutdown or reboot the system.

NOTE: If you do not want to have to deal with this every time, within the VMware GUI, choose Edit > Preferences... Workspace > Keep VMs running after Workstation closes. By doing this, you won't be prompted after closing the VMware GUI whether you want to keep the VM(s) running.

Reminder: To keep the VM running, make sure to LOCK your system rather than signing out. If you do not bring the GUI to the foreground, you can sign out and the VM will continue to run.
 

My Computers

System One System Two

  • Operating System
    Windows 11 21H2
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop
    Manufacturer/Model
    Home Built
    CPU
    Intel i7-11700K
    Motherboard
    ASUS Prime Z590-A
    Memory
    128GB Crucial Ballistix 3200MHz DRAM
    Graphics Card(s)
    No GPU - CPU graphics only (for now)
    Sound Card
    Realtek (on motherboard)
    Monitor(s) Displays
    HP Envy 32
    Screen Resolution
    2560 x 1440
    Hard Drives
    1 x 1TB NVMe Gen 4 x 4 SSD
    1 x 2TB NVMe Gen 3 x 4 SSD
    2 x 512GB 2.5" SSDs
    2 x 8TB HD
    PSU
    Corsair HX850i
    Case
    Corsair iCue 5000X RGB
    Cooling
    Noctua NH-D15 chromax.black cooler + 10 case fans
    Keyboard
    CODE backlit mechanical keyboard
    Mouse
    Logitech MX Master 3
    Internet Speed
    300Mb down / 20Mb up
    Browser
    Chromium Edge
    Antivirus
    Windows Defender
    Other Info
    Additional options installed:
    WiFi 6E PCIe adapter
    ASUS ThunderboltEX 4 PCIe adapter
  • Operating System
    Windows 11 21H2
    Computer type
    Laptop
    Manufacturer/Model
    HP Spectre x360 15-BL012DX
    CPU
    Intel i7-7500U
    Memory
    32GB
    Graphics card(s)
    Dual Intel HD 620 and Nvidia GeForce 940MX
    Sound Card
    Built-in Realtek HD Audio
    Monitor(s) Displays
    4k 15-inch
    Screen Resolution
    4k (3840 x 2160)
    Hard Drives
    1TB Seagate FireCuda 510 NVMe SSD
    Internet Speed
    300Mb down / 20Mb up
    Browser
    Chromium Edge
    Antivirus
    Windows Defender
    Other Info
    RAM Upgraded from 16GB to 32GB WiFi Upgraded from WiFi 5 to WiFi 6 SSD upgraded from 512GB NVMe SSD to 1TB Seagate FireCuda 510 NVMe SSD

jimbo45

Well-known member
Member
VIP
Thread Starter
Local time
9:34 PM
Posts
646
Location
Hafnarfjörður IS
Hi there

@hsehestedt

Thanks for the info -- I can't understand why VMWare is making a meal of this -- they used to have "VMWare server" which allowed that.

Just look how simple it's becoming using Linux Hosts with their Hypervisor these days !!!

Screenshot_20210819_134019.png

Surely some sort of "Autostart" feature in Windows should be possible in the VM setup -- after all VMWare starts some services automatically now anyway.

No need to logon even as root -- just boot the machine - the VM('s) start automatically even without a desktop GUI -- and you can go on your way !!!!!.

Can all be done from the xml config file for the appropriate VM if you don't want to use the Virtual machine manager GUI. !!!

Cheers
jimbo
 

My Computer

System One

  • Operating System
    Windows XP,7,10,11 Linux Arch Linux
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop
    CPU
    2 X Intel i7

Hopachi

Active member
Local time
11:34 PM
Posts
62
I would have to verify this, but it is possible that the ability to suspend the VM upon shutdown / reboot may require Win 10 Pro, not Home because it will require a Group Policy and I think that Home has no Group Policy editor.
On Home you can create the specific registry entry for the policy, so it should work without the editor.
This one in particular I have no idea how it's called, a quick search reveals it:
 

My Computers

System One System Two

  • Operating System
    Linux: Fedora 3x 64-bit / Windows 10 Pro 64-bit in VM
    Computer type
    Laptop
    Manufacturer/Model
    TOSHIBA Tecra W50-A
    CPU
    Intel i7-4810MQ
    Motherboard
    TOSHIBA, Intel QM87 Express Chipset
    Memory
    32GB DDR3 @1600
    Graphics Card(s)
    Nvidia Quadro K2100M - 2GB
    Sound Card
    Realtek HD Audio
    Monitor(s) Displays
    15.6' built-in + LG-32ML600M
    Screen Resolution
    1920x1080
    Hard Drives
    Samsung SSD 840 250GB + Samsung SSD QVO 2TB
    PSU
    180W adapter
    Cooling
    The usual airflow + docked to station - PA5117E-1PRP
    Keyboard
    Backlit built-in + Logitech Orion G610
    Mouse
    SteelSeries Rival 100 Red
    Internet Speed
    Good enough
    Browser
    Chromium, Edge, Firefox
    Antivirus
    Windows Defender
  • Operating System
    Windows 10 Pro 64-bit
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop
    Manufacturer/Model
    Custom Build
    CPU
    AMD Ryzen 7 1800X
    Motherboard
    MSI Mortar B350M
    Memory
    32GB DDR4 @2666
    Graphics card(s)
    GYGABYTE AORUS Radeon RX580 8G
    Sound Card
    Realtek HD Audio
    Monitor(s) Displays
    Medion 27'
    Screen Resolution
    1920x1080
    Hard Drives
    WD Black 3D NAND SSD 250 GB NVMe + 4x HDD WD Blue 500GB 2.5'
    PSU
    Corsair Builder CX550M
    Case
    Fractal Design Define Mini (Black)
    Cooling
    Noctua NH-D15S
    Mouse
    Good one, with cable / long tail
    Keyboard
    Lenovo SK-8825(L)
    Internet Speed
    N/A
    Browser
    Firefox
    Antivirus
    Windows Defender

jimbo45

Well-known member
Member
VIP
Thread Starter
Local time
9:34 PM
Posts
646
Location
Hafnarfjörður IS
On Home you can create the specific registry entry for the policy, so it should work without the editor.
This one in particular I have no idea how it's called, a quick search reveals it:
Hi there

@Hopachi

the problem seems to be the fact (at least on VMWare WKS rel 16.x that the VM (Windows VM's) is assigned to a specific user so if that user logs out the VM may be still running in the background but can't be accessed .

On Linux Hosts KVM Windows VM's run just fine straight from boot without even a GUI running. I'm playing around with a W11 VM on a Linux host now under VMWare WKS 16.x to see if I can access the VM remotely. I can run both VMWare VM's and KVM VM's concurrently so I should be able to RDP to either of them from a "remote" laptop.

Shutting / suspending a VM isn't the issue -- starting a VMWare VM at boot seems on Windows hosts not to be possible as you need to be a foreground user to start the VM.

Test 1 -- Bring up VM on Linux Host (VMWare running) and from laptop RDP to it.
Test 2 -- logout of the Host machine and see if W11 VM still acessible --- KVM VM's OK, will test VMWare and see what happens.

Cheers
jimbo
 

My Computer

System One

  • Operating System
    Windows XP,7,10,11 Linux Arch Linux
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop
    CPU
    2 X Intel i7

Hopachi

Active member
Local time
11:34 PM
Posts
62
OK @jimbo45 good luck.
I've only added a minor detail on that interesting procedure @hsehestedt posted.
 

My Computers

System One System Two

  • Operating System
    Linux: Fedora 3x 64-bit / Windows 10 Pro 64-bit in VM
    Computer type
    Laptop
    Manufacturer/Model
    TOSHIBA Tecra W50-A
    CPU
    Intel i7-4810MQ
    Motherboard
    TOSHIBA, Intel QM87 Express Chipset
    Memory
    32GB DDR3 @1600
    Graphics Card(s)
    Nvidia Quadro K2100M - 2GB
    Sound Card
    Realtek HD Audio
    Monitor(s) Displays
    15.6' built-in + LG-32ML600M
    Screen Resolution
    1920x1080
    Hard Drives
    Samsung SSD 840 250GB + Samsung SSD QVO 2TB
    PSU
    180W adapter
    Cooling
    The usual airflow + docked to station - PA5117E-1PRP
    Keyboard
    Backlit built-in + Logitech Orion G610
    Mouse
    SteelSeries Rival 100 Red
    Internet Speed
    Good enough
    Browser
    Chromium, Edge, Firefox
    Antivirus
    Windows Defender
  • Operating System
    Windows 10 Pro 64-bit
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop
    Manufacturer/Model
    Custom Build
    CPU
    AMD Ryzen 7 1800X
    Motherboard
    MSI Mortar B350M
    Memory
    32GB DDR4 @2666
    Graphics card(s)
    GYGABYTE AORUS Radeon RX580 8G
    Sound Card
    Realtek HD Audio
    Monitor(s) Displays
    Medion 27'
    Screen Resolution
    1920x1080
    Hard Drives
    WD Black 3D NAND SSD 250 GB NVMe + 4x HDD WD Blue 500GB 2.5'
    PSU
    Corsair Builder CX550M
    Case
    Fractal Design Define Mini (Black)
    Cooling
    Noctua NH-D15S
    Mouse
    Good one, with cable / long tail
    Keyboard
    Lenovo SK-8825(L)
    Internet Speed
    N/A
    Browser
    Firefox
    Antivirus
    Windows Defender

jimbo45

Well-known member
Member
VIP
Thread Starter
Local time
9:34 PM
Posts
646
Location
Hafnarfjörður IS
Hi there
1) VMWare RDP from remote laptop with user logged on to Host works as designed -- no problems there with standard RDP connection.

2) User logs off the HOST --RDP disconnects

vmware2.png

If User then re-logs on to the Host machine the VMWare VM is powered off so really pretty useless if you say just want to have the HOST running Windows (or other) VM's with the terminal locked / running in headless mode.

Under KVM the VM is accessible stright from Host boot up (if boot automatically when host is booted is enabled.

Here Host in "terminal mode" - no user logged on but KVM W11 VM acessible from remote laptop

kvm1.png


Much more useful !!!!

I know VMWare WKS is really for a single workstation - so what I would be looking for on VMWare is the old VM server which did what I wanted -- seems the latest release of WKS has removed some useful features.


Cheers
jimbo
 
Last edited:

My Computer

System One

  • Operating System
    Windows XP,7,10,11 Linux Arch Linux
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop
    CPU
    2 X Intel i7

Kari

PhD in Malt Based Liquids
Power User
VIP
Local time
11:34 PM
Posts
575
Location
Expat from Finland in Leipzig Germany
Just look how simple it's becoming using Linux Hosts with their Hypervisor these days !!!
Hyper-V in WIndows makes it even easier.

Save the VM state when host shuts down:

Hyper-V Save VM State.jpg

Restore VM state when host boots:

Hyper-V Restore VM at Host Boot.jpg

That's it.

Kari
 

My Computers

System One System Two

  • Operating System
    Windows 11 PRO x64 Dev
    Manufacturer/Model
    Hyper-V Virtual Machine (host in System 2 specs)
    CPU
    Intel Core i7-8550U
    Memory
    6 GB
    Graphics Card(s)
    Microsoft Hyper-V Video
    Monitor(s) Displays
    Laptop display (17.1") & Samsung U28E590 (27.7")
  • Operating System
    Windows 11 PRO x64 Dev Channel
    Computer type
    Laptop
    Manufacturer/Model
    HP HP ProBook 470 G5
    CPU
    Intel Core i7-8550U
    Motherboard
    HP 837F KBC Version 02.3D.00
    Memory
    16 GB
    Graphics card(s)
    Intel(R) UHD Graphics 620 & NVIDIA GeForce 930MX
    Sound Card
    Conexant ISST Audio
    Monitor(s) Displays
    Laptop display (17.1") & Samsung U28E590 (27.7")
    Hard Drives
    128 GB SSD & 1 TB HDD
    Mouse
    Wireless Logitech MSX mouse
    Keyboard
    Wireless Logitech MK710 keyboard
    Internet Speed
    100 Mbps down, 20 Mbps up
    Browser
    Edge Chromium Dev Channel
    Antivirus
    Windows Defender
    Other Info
    2 * 3 TB USB HDD
    6 TB WD Mirror NAS

cereberus

Well-known member
Power User
VIP
Local time
10:34 PM
Posts
399
Hyper-V in WIndows makes it even easier.

Save the VM state when host shuts down:

View attachment 6051

Restore VM state when host boots:

View attachment 6050

That's it.

Kari
Yep - dead easy. Now I have worked out how to get sound in Hyper-V for Linux (Ubuntu at least), I have no reason to use any other Hypervisor. All my Windows are Pro based. I never run Home in Hyper-V as that cannot run in enhanced mode.

Also as @Jimbo says, if you sign out from Host, the Hyper-V VM continues to run, so a user with account on VM can access the VM but not the Host (unless they also have account on Host).

Obviously, on W10 non server versions, only one person can RDP to a VM at a time.

I have yet to test if two users can rdp to separate VMs but I see no reason why not so long as only one user per VM logged in.
 
Last edited:

My Computer

System One

  • Operating System
    Windows 10 Pro + others in VHDs
    Computer type
    Laptop
    Manufacturer/Model
    ASUS Vivobook 14
    CPU
    I7
    Motherboard
    Yep, Laptop has one.
    Memory
    16 GB
    Graphics Card(s)
    Integrated Intel Iris XE
    Sound Card
    Realtek built in
    Monitor(s) Displays
    N/A
    Screen Resolution
    1920x1080
    Hard Drives
    1 TB Optane NVME SSD, 1 TB NVME SSD
    PSU
    Yep, got one
    Case
    Yep, got one
    Cooling
    Stella Artois
    Keyboard
    Built in
    Mouse
    Bluetooth , wired
    Internet Speed
    72 Mb/s :-(
    Browser
    Edge mostly
    Antivirus
    Defender
    Other Info
    TPM 2.0

jimbo45

Well-known member
Member
VIP
Thread Starter
Local time
9:34 PM
Posts
646
Location
Hafnarfjörður IS
Yep - dead easy. Now I have worked out how to get sound in Hyper-V for Linux (Ubuntu at least), I have no reason to use any other Hypervisor. All my Windows are Pro based. I never run Home in Hyper-V as that cannot run in enhanced mode.

Also as @Jimbo says, if you sign out from Host, the Hyper-V VM continues to run, so a user with account on VM can access the VM but not the Host (unless they also have account on Host).

Obviously, on W10 non server versions, only one person can RDP to a VM at a time.

I have yet to test if two users can rdp to separate VMs but I see no reason why not so long as only one user per VM logged in.
Thanks guys - especially @cereberus and @Kari

Two users can RDP to different VM 's concurrently on HYPER-V -- tested OK -- from different remote RDP sessions of course as Windows is essentially a single user system.

Thanks also for the info on VM in HYPER-V continuing to run if user logs off HOST - -- BTW multiple users can logon to a single Linux VM running on HYPER-V concurrently by nature of Linux being a multi-user system.

Cheers
jimbo
 

My Computer

System One

  • Operating System
    Windows XP,7,10,11 Linux Arch Linux
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop
    CPU
    2 X Intel i7

cereberus

Well-known member
Power User
VIP
Local time
10:34 PM
Posts
399
Thanks guys - especially @cereberus and @Kari

Two users can RDP to different VM 's concurrently on HYPER-V -- tested OK -- from different remote RDP sessions of course as Windows is essentially a single user system.

Thanks also for the info on VM in HYPER-V continuing to run if user logs off HOST - -- BTW multiple users can logon to a single Linux VM running on HYPER-V concurrently by nature of Linux being a multi-user system.

Cheers
jimbo
Yeah I tested multiple vm sessions (one user per session) and it works fine.
 

My Computer

System One

  • Operating System
    Windows 10 Pro + others in VHDs
    Computer type
    Laptop
    Manufacturer/Model
    ASUS Vivobook 14
    CPU
    I7
    Motherboard
    Yep, Laptop has one.
    Memory
    16 GB
    Graphics Card(s)
    Integrated Intel Iris XE
    Sound Card
    Realtek built in
    Monitor(s) Displays
    N/A
    Screen Resolution
    1920x1080
    Hard Drives
    1 TB Optane NVME SSD, 1 TB NVME SSD
    PSU
    Yep, got one
    Case
    Yep, got one
    Cooling
    Stella Artois
    Keyboard
    Built in
    Mouse
    Bluetooth , wired
    Internet Speed
    72 Mb/s :-(
    Browser
    Edge mostly
    Antivirus
    Defender
    Other Info
    TPM 2.0

hsehestedt

Well-known member
Member
VIP
Local time
4:34 PM
Posts
287
Location
Texas, USA
My opinion only so no need to jump on me for this:

While I prefer to use Microsoft native stuff wherever I can, the one big exception for me is the Hypervisor. I hate Hyper-V with a passion.

I seem to frequently have difficulties moving a Hyper-V VM from one location to another. Also, on 3 out 3 machines, it has caused network problems for me on the host PC. I'm sure that is not what most others experience, but my config may be different from that of most people.
 

My Computers

System One System Two

  • Operating System
    Windows 11 21H2
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop
    Manufacturer/Model
    Home Built
    CPU
    Intel i7-11700K
    Motherboard
    ASUS Prime Z590-A
    Memory
    128GB Crucial Ballistix 3200MHz DRAM
    Graphics Card(s)
    No GPU - CPU graphics only (for now)
    Sound Card
    Realtek (on motherboard)
    Monitor(s) Displays
    HP Envy 32
    Screen Resolution
    2560 x 1440
    Hard Drives
    1 x 1TB NVMe Gen 4 x 4 SSD
    1 x 2TB NVMe Gen 3 x 4 SSD
    2 x 512GB 2.5" SSDs
    2 x 8TB HD
    PSU
    Corsair HX850i
    Case
    Corsair iCue 5000X RGB
    Cooling
    Noctua NH-D15 chromax.black cooler + 10 case fans
    Keyboard
    CODE backlit mechanical keyboard
    Mouse
    Logitech MX Master 3
    Internet Speed
    300Mb down / 20Mb up
    Browser
    Chromium Edge
    Antivirus
    Windows Defender
    Other Info
    Additional options installed:
    WiFi 6E PCIe adapter
    ASUS ThunderboltEX 4 PCIe adapter
  • Operating System
    Windows 11 21H2
    Computer type
    Laptop
    Manufacturer/Model
    HP Spectre x360 15-BL012DX
    CPU
    Intel i7-7500U
    Memory
    32GB
    Graphics card(s)
    Dual Intel HD 620 and Nvidia GeForce 940MX
    Sound Card
    Built-in Realtek HD Audio
    Monitor(s) Displays
    4k 15-inch
    Screen Resolution
    4k (3840 x 2160)
    Hard Drives
    1TB Seagate FireCuda 510 NVMe SSD
    Internet Speed
    300Mb down / 20Mb up
    Browser
    Chromium Edge
    Antivirus
    Windows Defender
    Other Info
    RAM Upgraded from 16GB to 32GB WiFi Upgraded from WiFi 5 to WiFi 6 SSD upgraded from 512GB NVMe SSD to 1TB Seagate FireCuda 510 NVMe SSD

cereberus

Well-known member
Power User
VIP
Local time
10:34 PM
Posts
399
My opinion only so no need to jump on me for this:

While I prefer to use Microsoft native stuff wherever I can, the one big exception for me is the Hypervisor. I hate Hyper-V with a passion.

I seem to frequently have difficulties moving a Hyper-V VM from one location to another. Also, on 3 out 3 machines, it has caused network problems for me on the host PC. I'm sure that is not what most others experience, but my config may be different from that of most people.
I am not sure why you have difficulty moving the vms. The trick is to remove the vhds and isos from the vm, transfer to new pc, and then reinstating vhds.

Regarding network issues, it may be related to issues with external switches.

 

My Computer

System One

  • Operating System
    Windows 10 Pro + others in VHDs
    Computer type
    Laptop
    Manufacturer/Model
    ASUS Vivobook 14
    CPU
    I7
    Motherboard
    Yep, Laptop has one.
    Memory
    16 GB
    Graphics Card(s)
    Integrated Intel Iris XE
    Sound Card
    Realtek built in
    Monitor(s) Displays
    N/A
    Screen Resolution
    1920x1080
    Hard Drives
    1 TB Optane NVME SSD, 1 TB NVME SSD
    PSU
    Yep, got one
    Case
    Yep, got one
    Cooling
    Stella Artois
    Keyboard
    Built in
    Mouse
    Bluetooth , wired
    Internet Speed
    72 Mb/s :-(
    Browser
    Edge mostly
    Antivirus
    Defender
    Other Info
    TPM 2.0

jimbo45

Well-known member
Member
VIP
Thread Starter
Local time
9:34 PM
Posts
646
Location
Hafnarfjörður IS
Hi there
not sure why moving VM's around whatever VM system you are using should cause any problems --that's the purpose of typical VM's is to be hardware independent and possibly scaleable. OK moving Windows VM's can cause a problem with activation based on a moved / copied VM having a new uuid which Windows activation might detect as different hardware but if you keep the same uuid in the VM's config that shouldn't happen.

Meanwhile moving VM's should be simple by loads of means --snapshotting, exporting, taking a macrium or equivalent image of the VM and / or the Host system, replicating the VHD's, duplicating Host and or VM's physical disks etc etc.

Of all the problems one could have with VM's I think the least likely one should be copying / moving them -- at least that's been my experience with them so far.

Cheers
jimbo
 

My Computer

System One

  • Operating System
    Windows XP,7,10,11 Linux Arch Linux
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop
    CPU
    2 X Intel i7

Hopachi

Active member
Local time
11:34 PM
Posts
62
Ah yes, moving...
Moving VMs was something done pretty much differently (as in different ways to do it) on each hypervisor. Though the basics are the same; you copy / move your virtual disk and you are as good to go.

I've now got used to how Hyper-V manages it.
Where in VirtualBox I had to dig in the XML config for the ID's and stuff, I still find this very handy also on QEMU/KVM, I can copy the XML as a kind of manual export/backup.

Simply copying or moving the disk without the UUID of machine would show some problems in Hyper-V.
Thanks to @Kari and @cereberus tutorials here I found how to better export so that a 'move' can be done properly in Hyper-V.

My non-activated test machines can just be moved with the disk alone.
But those activated VMs would need to be moved with ID and all, and also best to have all the specs as before instead of guessing those each time in config.
 

My Computers

System One System Two

  • Operating System
    Linux: Fedora 3x 64-bit / Windows 10 Pro 64-bit in VM
    Computer type
    Laptop
    Manufacturer/Model
    TOSHIBA Tecra W50-A
    CPU
    Intel i7-4810MQ
    Motherboard
    TOSHIBA, Intel QM87 Express Chipset
    Memory
    32GB DDR3 @1600
    Graphics Card(s)
    Nvidia Quadro K2100M - 2GB
    Sound Card
    Realtek HD Audio
    Monitor(s) Displays
    15.6' built-in + LG-32ML600M
    Screen Resolution
    1920x1080
    Hard Drives
    Samsung SSD 840 250GB + Samsung SSD QVO 2TB
    PSU
    180W adapter
    Cooling
    The usual airflow + docked to station - PA5117E-1PRP
    Keyboard
    Backlit built-in + Logitech Orion G610
    Mouse
    SteelSeries Rival 100 Red
    Internet Speed
    Good enough
    Browser
    Chromium, Edge, Firefox
    Antivirus
    Windows Defender
  • Operating System
    Windows 10 Pro 64-bit
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop
    Manufacturer/Model
    Custom Build
    CPU
    AMD Ryzen 7 1800X
    Motherboard
    MSI Mortar B350M
    Memory
    32GB DDR4 @2666
    Graphics card(s)
    GYGABYTE AORUS Radeon RX580 8G
    Sound Card
    Realtek HD Audio
    Monitor(s) Displays
    Medion 27'
    Screen Resolution
    1920x1080
    Hard Drives
    WD Black 3D NAND SSD 250 GB NVMe + 4x HDD WD Blue 500GB 2.5'
    PSU
    Corsair Builder CX550M
    Case
    Fractal Design Define Mini (Black)
    Cooling
    Noctua NH-D15S
    Mouse
    Good one, with cable / long tail
    Keyboard
    Lenovo SK-8825(L)
    Internet Speed
    N/A
    Browser
    Firefox
    Antivirus
    Windows Defender
Top Bottom