Windows Update Enable or Disable Auto-restart Notifications for Windows Update in Windows 11


  • Staff
Windows_Update_banner.jpg

This tutorial will show you how to enable or disable showing auto-restart notifications for Windows Update in Windows 11.

Windows Update keeps Windows 11 updated by automatically downloading and installing the latest updates, drivers, and hotfixes released by Microsoft.

You can turn on or off to show a notification when your device requires a restart to finish updating.

Reference:


Contents

  • Option One: Turn On or Off Auto-restart Notifications for Windows Update in Settings
  • Option Two: Turn On or Off Auto-restart Notifications for Windows Update using REG file
  • Option Three: Enable or Disable Auto-restart Notifications for Windows Update in Local Group Policy Editor
  • Option Four: Enable or Disable Auto-restart Notifications for Windows Update using REG file


EXAMPLE: Windows Update auto-restart notifications

Windows_Update_auto-restart_notification.png
Windows_Update_restart_message.png





Option One

Turn On or Off Auto-restart Notifications for Windows Update in Settings


1 Open Settings (Win+I).

2 Click/tap on Windows Update on the left side, and click/tap on Advanced options on the right side. (see screenshot below)


Windows_Update_auto-restart_notifications_Settings-1.png

3 Turn On or Off (default) Notify me when a restart is required to finish updating for what you want. (see screenshot below)

Windows_Update_auto-restart_notifications_Settings-2.png

4 You can now close Settings if you like.




Option Two

Turn On or Off Auto-restart Notifications for Windows Update using REG file


You must be signed in as an administrator to use this option.


1 Do step 2 (on) or step 3 (off) below for what you would like to do.


 2. Turn On Auto-restart Notifications for Windows Update

A) Click/tap on the Download button below to download the file below, and go to step 4 below.​

Turn_on_auto-restart_notifications_for_Windows_Update.reg


(Contents of REG file for reference)
Code:
Windows Registry Editor Version 5.00

[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\WindowsUpdate\UX\Settings]
"RestartNotificationsAllowed2"=dword:00000001


 3. Turn Off Auto-restart Notifications for Windows Update

This is the default setting


A) Click/tap on the Download button below to download the file below, and go to step 4 below.​

Turn_off_auto-restart_notifications_for_Windows_Update.reg


(Contents of REG file for reference)
Code:
Windows Registry Editor Version 5.00

[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\WindowsUpdate\UX\Settings]
"RestartNotificationsAllowed2"=dword:00000000

4 Save the REG file to your desktop.

5 Double click/tap on the downloaded REG file to merge it.

6 When prompted, click/tap on Run, Yes (UAC), Yes, and OK to approve the merge.

7 You can now delete the downloaded REG file if you like.




Option Three

Enable or Disable Auto-restart Notifications for Windows Update in Local Group Policy Editor


You must be signed in as an administrator to use this option.

The Local Group Policy Editor is only available in the Windows 11 Pro, Enterprise, and Education editions.

All editions can use Option Four for the same policy.


1 Open the Local Group Policy Editor (gpedit.msc).

2 Navigate to the policy location below in the left pane of the Local Group Policy Editor. (see screenshot below)

Computer Configuration/Administrative Templates/Windows Components/Windows Update/Legacy Policies

Windows_Update_auto-restart_notifications_gpedit-1.png

3 In the right pane of Legacy Policies in the Local Group Policy Editor, double click/tap on the Turn off auto-restart notifications for update installations policy to edit it. (see screenshot above)

4 Do step 5 (enable) or step 6 (disable) below for what you would like to do.

5 Enable Auto-restart Notifications for Windows Update

This is the default setting to allow using Option One and Option Two.


A) Select (dot) Not Configured, click/tap on OK, and go to step 7 below. (see screenshot below)​

Windows_Update_auto-restart_notifications_gpedit-2.png

6 Disable Auto-restart Notifications for Windows Update

This will gray out and disable the Notify me when a restart is required to finish updating setting for Option One and Option Two.


A) Select (dot) Enabled, click/tap on OK, and go to step 7 below. (see screenshot below)​

Windows_Update_auto-restart_notifications_gpedit-3.png

7 You can now close the Local Group Policy Editor if you like.




Option Four

Enable or Disable Auto-restart Notifications for Windows Update using REG file


You must be signed in as an administrator to use this option.


1 Do step 2 (enable) or step 3 (disable) below for what you would like to do.


 2. Enable Auto-restart Notifications for Windows Update

This is the default setting to allow using Option One and Option Two.


A) Click/tap on the Download button below to download the file below, and go to step 4 below.​

Enable_auto-restart_notifications_for_Windows_Update.reg


(Contents of REG file for reference)
Code:
Windows Registry Editor Version 5.00

[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Policies\Microsoft\Windows\WindowsUpdate]
"SetAutoRestartNotificationDisable"=-


 3. Disable Auto-restart Notifications for Windows Update

This will gray out and disable the Notify me when a restart is required to finish updating setting for Option One and Option Two.


A) Click/tap on the Download button below to download the file below, and go to step 4 below.​

Disable_auto-restart_notifications_for_Windows_Update.reg


(Contents of REG file for reference)
Code:
Windows Registry Editor Version 5.00

[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Policies\Microsoft\Windows\WindowsUpdate]
"SetAutoRestartNotificationDisable"=dword:00000001

4 Save the REG file to your desktop.

5 Double click/tap on the downloaded REG file to merge it.

6 When prompted, click/tap on Run, Yes (UAC), Yes, and OK to approve the merge.

7 You can now delete the downloaded REG file if you like.


That's it,
Shawn Brink


 

Attachments

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Last edited:
I'm not clear what those settings do. All I need is for it to inform me when an update is ready, but hold off restarting indefinitely until I say go.
 

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    Windows 11 Professional (not the cut down rubbish)
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop
    Manufacturer/Model
    Home built, of course
    CPU
    Ryzen 9 3900XT (on this one anyway, I have 8)
    Motherboard
    MSI X470 Gaming Plus Max
    Memory
    72G and 72GB and 64GB and 32GB and 32GB and 8GB and 8GB and 8GB
    Graphics Card(s)
    Fury and 12 Tahitis
    Sound Card
    People still use cards for those?
    Monitor(s) Displays
    7 of them.
    Screen Resolution
    All sorts.
    Hard Drives
    1TB NVME, 4TB rust spinner
    PSU
    Several kW
    Case
    Unimportant
    Cooling
    Big Zalman 6 inch thing
    Keyboard
    Really?
    Mouse
    Yes
    Internet Speed
    32Mbit/7Mbit
    Browser
    Opera
    Antivirus
    AVG
    Other Info
    [Crosses legs] Exactly what info are you looking for?
Hmmm...... Rather disappointing that there has been no response to Lamberto's question. I don't see how I get it to act like this:

Download any updates as soon as they are detected but DO NOT INSTALL THEM. Just notify me.

When I'm ready, I will push the buttons to do the install.

If a reboot is necessary to complete the update, DO NOT SCHEDULE A REBOOT AUTOMATICALLY. I will decide when a reboot is convenient for me. Don't put a timer on me. I have not yet seen the prompt that allows me to pick a time. But I don't want to pick a time. Just leave me alone until I'm ready.

Does suppressing the notification actually prevent it from beginning a timer that will cause an abrupt reboot when I might be in the middle of something I don't want to interrupt? Like listening to or watching a livestream of some kind, for example. I hate this assumption that Microsoft knows what's best for me. Let me do these things on my schedule.
 

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    Windows 11 Pro 64-bit 23H2
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop
    Manufacturer/Model
    Self build
    CPU
    Intel Core i9-13900K
    Motherboard
    ASUS Z790-Plus WiFi TUF Gaming
    Memory
    4x32G Corsair Vengeance RGB DDR5 6000MHz
    Graphics Card(s)
    MSI/NVidia GeForce RTX 4070 Gaming X Trio 12G GDDR6X + built into motherboard Intel UHD Graphics
    Sound Card
    Built into graphics card + built into motherboard Realtek Audio
    Monitor(s) Displays
    Both connected to the NVidia adapter - Primary: Dell SE2417HGX 23" diagonal connected via HDMI-to-DisplayPort dongle, Secondary: Toshiba TV 32" diagonal connected via HDMI through Onkyo TX-NR717 surround receiver
    Screen Resolution
    1920x1080 on each monitor
    Hard Drives
    Samsung 970 EVO Plus NVMe M.2 2T
    6xSATA-to-USB 3.0 Fideco external enclosures holding SATA drives of various brands & sizes 1x20T, 2x18T, 2x6T, 1x500G, all connected to a multi-port USB hub
    For backups: USB 3.0 HDDs of various brands & sizes 1x20T, 2x4T, 1x1T + SSDs of various brands & sizes 2x480G, 1x1T, all connected to another multi-port USB hub, powered on only while actually performing backups & (may it never happen) restores
    PSU
    MSI MPG A1000G PCIe5 1000W, TrippLite Smart1500TSU 1200W UPS for the main system, TrippLite ECO850LCD 850W UPS for the DASD & my Internet connectivity boxes (no reason to throw out legacy equipment that stil works fine)
    Case
    Fractal North
    Cooling
    DeepCool AK620 CPU cooler (air, 2 fans), 2 case fans, 1 fan in PSU, 3 fans in graphics adapter
    Keyboard
    Cherry MX 11900 USB (wired)
    Mouse
    Touchpad built into the keyboard
    Internet Speed
    500Mbps via Spectrum cable TV/cell phone bundle
    Browser
    Firefox
    Antivirus
    Built into Windows 11
Sorry @Lamberto Vitali and @WildWilly , :alien:

This tutorial is only to enable or disable seeing the auto-restart notification. It doesn't prevent the auto-restart.

There's really nothing that will 100% prevent an eventual restart from an update. The best you can do is to delay it long enough to restart when you're ready withing a grace period so it doesn't just restart while you're in the middle of something.

You can take a look at the Specify deadlines for automatic updates and restarts group policy used in the tutorial below to specify an auto-restart grace period with Don't auto-restart until end of grace period.

 

My Computers

System One System Two

  • OS
    Windows 11 Pro for Workstations
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop
    Manufacturer/Model
    Custom self build
    CPU
    Intel i7-8700K 5 GHz
    Motherboard
    ASUS ROG Maximus XI Formula Z390
    Memory
    64 GB (4x16GB) G.SKILL TridentZ RGB DDR4 3600 MHz (F4-3600C18D-32GTZR)
    Graphics Card(s)
    ASUS ROG-STRIX-GTX1080TI-O11G-GAMING (11GB GDDR5X)
    Sound Card
    Integrated Digital Audio (S/PDIF)
    Monitor(s) Displays
    2 x Samsung Odyssey G75 27"
    Screen Resolution
    2560x1440
    Hard Drives
    1TB Samsung 990 PRO M.2,
    4TB Samsung 990 PRO M.2,
    8TB WD MyCloudEX2Ultra NAS
    PSU
    Seasonic Prime Titanium 850W
    Case
    Thermaltake Core P3 wall mounted
    Cooling
    Corsair Hydro H115i
    Keyboard
    Logitech wireless K800
    Mouse
    Logitech MX Master 3
    Internet Speed
    1 Gbps Download and 35 Mbps Upload
    Browser
    Google Chrome
    Antivirus
    Microsoft Defender and Malwarebytes Premium
    Other Info
    Logitech Z625 speaker system,
    Logitech BRIO 4K Pro webcam,
    HP Color LaserJet Pro MFP M477fdn,
    APC SMART-UPS RT 1000 XL - SURT1000XLI,
    Galaxy S23 Plus phone
  • Operating System
    Windows 11 Pro
    Computer type
    Laptop
    Manufacturer/Model
    HP Spectre x360 2in1 14-eu0098nr (2024)
    CPU
    Intel Core Ultra 7 155H 4.8 GHz
    Memory
    16 GB LPDDR5x-7467 MHz
    Graphics card(s)
    Integrated Intel Arc
    Sound Card
    Poly Studio
    Monitor(s) Displays
    14" 2.8K OLED multitouch
    Screen Resolution
    2880 x 1800
    Hard Drives
    2 TB PCIe NVMe M.2 SSD
    Internet Speed
    Intel Wi-Fi 7 BE200 (2x2) and Bluetooth 5.4
    Browser
    Chrome and Edge
    Antivirus
    Windows Defender and Malwarebytes Premium
I wanted to add this comment to this one of your tutorials:


But it's on tenforums. I don't feel like signing up for an ID over there as well. I mean geez, I've already got an ID not only here but on 7forums as well. So I'm going to post this here because I think this is the answer to our problem.

The Local Group Policy Editor does NOT look exactly like what you've shown in your tutorial on tf. This is what I am getting right now on my W11 which I've just gotten running in the past couple of days:

1701486533840.png


Look at the the item I've highlighted in the right pane. And read that description in the middle (whose size I can't adjust because there isn't a draggable thing there). It's exactly what we want. At least it looks like it. Double clicking that legacy policy gives this:

1701487191789.png


I'm enabling this & I'm going to see if this solves the issue. As you can read there, there is another policy that also needs to be enabled. I'm going to do that one as well.

At this point, I say the jury is still out. I'll see what happens next time I get an update. I just did a pile of them as part of my initial connection to the Internet while configuring the system for the first time. I imagine it will be at least a few days if not a week or two before I get another update. So we just have to be patient.

Also, I don't like that this is classified as a "Legacy" policy. To my way of thinking, that means it's on the chopping block. It's deprecated & could be deimplemented with no notice at any time. I wish there were a way to vote for promoting this back up to the status of a current policy & not a legacy one. There are so many things that Microsoft has done without regard to what real people really want. This seems to do what we want. At least part of it. I still wish it would download the updates & then wait for me to actually install them. But if they get automatically installed & I can indefinitely postpone any required reboots, that's close enough. The installing bit is just that I like to monitor these things to see what they're doing. But if the reboot is completely suppressed, I suppose I can look in the update history to see what happened before I reboot.

Anyway, this greatly improves my mood.
 

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    Windows 11 Pro 64-bit 23H2
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop
    Manufacturer/Model
    Self build
    CPU
    Intel Core i9-13900K
    Motherboard
    ASUS Z790-Plus WiFi TUF Gaming
    Memory
    4x32G Corsair Vengeance RGB DDR5 6000MHz
    Graphics Card(s)
    MSI/NVidia GeForce RTX 4070 Gaming X Trio 12G GDDR6X + built into motherboard Intel UHD Graphics
    Sound Card
    Built into graphics card + built into motherboard Realtek Audio
    Monitor(s) Displays
    Both connected to the NVidia adapter - Primary: Dell SE2417HGX 23" diagonal connected via HDMI-to-DisplayPort dongle, Secondary: Toshiba TV 32" diagonal connected via HDMI through Onkyo TX-NR717 surround receiver
    Screen Resolution
    1920x1080 on each monitor
    Hard Drives
    Samsung 970 EVO Plus NVMe M.2 2T
    6xSATA-to-USB 3.0 Fideco external enclosures holding SATA drives of various brands & sizes 1x20T, 2x18T, 2x6T, 1x500G, all connected to a multi-port USB hub
    For backups: USB 3.0 HDDs of various brands & sizes 1x20T, 2x4T, 1x1T + SSDs of various brands & sizes 2x480G, 1x1T, all connected to another multi-port USB hub, powered on only while actually performing backups & (may it never happen) restores
    PSU
    MSI MPG A1000G PCIe5 1000W, TrippLite Smart1500TSU 1200W UPS for the main system, TrippLite ECO850LCD 850W UPS for the DASD & my Internet connectivity boxes (no reason to throw out legacy equipment that stil works fine)
    Case
    Fractal North
    Cooling
    DeepCool AK620 CPU cooler (air, 2 fans), 2 case fans, 1 fan in PSU, 3 fans in graphics adapter
    Keyboard
    Cherry MX 11900 USB (wired)
    Mouse
    Touchpad built into the keyboard
    Internet Speed
    500Mbps via Spectrum cable TV/cell phone bundle
    Browser
    Firefox
    Antivirus
    Built into Windows 11
I may have hit the jackpot.

1701489636636.png


1701489790058.png


Pay particular attention to option 3 in that second image. I got a momentary chuckle out of seeing that it was the default.

So. Time will tell if this nails it.

By the way, I know these images are ridiculously tiny. Just click on them, & in the resulting image window, magnify them as necessary. I didn't realize until after I posted that that they include my second monitor. In future, I'll trim that. But this should be fine for today.
 

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    Windows 11 Pro 64-bit 23H2
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop
    Manufacturer/Model
    Self build
    CPU
    Intel Core i9-13900K
    Motherboard
    ASUS Z790-Plus WiFi TUF Gaming
    Memory
    4x32G Corsair Vengeance RGB DDR5 6000MHz
    Graphics Card(s)
    MSI/NVidia GeForce RTX 4070 Gaming X Trio 12G GDDR6X + built into motherboard Intel UHD Graphics
    Sound Card
    Built into graphics card + built into motherboard Realtek Audio
    Monitor(s) Displays
    Both connected to the NVidia adapter - Primary: Dell SE2417HGX 23" diagonal connected via HDMI-to-DisplayPort dongle, Secondary: Toshiba TV 32" diagonal connected via HDMI through Onkyo TX-NR717 surround receiver
    Screen Resolution
    1920x1080 on each monitor
    Hard Drives
    Samsung 970 EVO Plus NVMe M.2 2T
    6xSATA-to-USB 3.0 Fideco external enclosures holding SATA drives of various brands & sizes 1x20T, 2x18T, 2x6T, 1x500G, all connected to a multi-port USB hub
    For backups: USB 3.0 HDDs of various brands & sizes 1x20T, 2x4T, 1x1T + SSDs of various brands & sizes 2x480G, 1x1T, all connected to another multi-port USB hub, powered on only while actually performing backups & (may it never happen) restores
    PSU
    MSI MPG A1000G PCIe5 1000W, TrippLite Smart1500TSU 1200W UPS for the main system, TrippLite ECO850LCD 850W UPS for the DASD & my Internet connectivity boxes (no reason to throw out legacy equipment that stil works fine)
    Case
    Fractal North
    Cooling
    DeepCool AK620 CPU cooler (air, 2 fans), 2 case fans, 1 fan in PSU, 3 fans in graphics adapter
    Keyboard
    Cherry MX 11900 USB (wired)
    Mouse
    Touchpad built into the keyboard
    Internet Speed
    500Mbps via Spectrum cable TV/cell phone bundle
    Browser
    Firefox
    Antivirus
    Built into Windows 11
I'm now using this which works the same in Windows 11: How to Disable Windows 10 Update via Registry or Other Tools

I get a notification something is ready, then when I want, I click it to install and restart if necessary. Although lately I'm seeing updates not requiring a restart, have MS finally got this sorted? I'm old enough to remember Macs needing a restart for a printer driver!
 

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    Windows 11 Professional (not the cut down rubbish)
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop
    Manufacturer/Model
    Home built, of course
    CPU
    Ryzen 9 3900XT (on this one anyway, I have 8)
    Motherboard
    MSI X470 Gaming Plus Max
    Memory
    72G and 72GB and 64GB and 32GB and 32GB and 8GB and 8GB and 8GB
    Graphics Card(s)
    Fury and 12 Tahitis
    Sound Card
    People still use cards for those?
    Monitor(s) Displays
    7 of them.
    Screen Resolution
    All sorts.
    Hard Drives
    1TB NVME, 4TB rust spinner
    PSU
    Several kW
    Case
    Unimportant
    Cooling
    Big Zalman 6 inch thing
    Keyboard
    Really?
    Mouse
    Yes
    Internet Speed
    32Mbit/7Mbit
    Browser
    Opera
    Antivirus
    AVG
    Other Info
    [Crosses legs] Exactly what info are you looking for?
I have stuck with just doing the setup in the Local Group Policy Editor that I described upthread. I imagine the registry tweak you did instead is 100% equivalent. After a couple of days experience it looks like it's working. I'm not getting any notifications of updates pending even though they are. But they are not even getting downloaded. They just appear on the Windows Update tab of Settings. That's OK. So I need to incorporate in my daily routine looking at the Windows Update tab of Settings. That's not too onerous. My Internet connection is not the painfully slow one I used to have. It doesn't save much time to have to launch the download manually myself vs having the download already done in background while I wasn't watching. But the updates are not just installing by magic without my attention, which was part of my goal.

As for delayed or not even scheduled reboots, I haven't hit any of those. What I get, sometimes multiple times a day, are Security Intelligence Updates for Microsoft Defender Antivirus. That sounds like virus signature updates for the antivirus. Those wouldn't necessitate a reboot. I'd be shocked if something so trivial required a reboot. So I'm still waiting for a meatier update before I pronounce total success here. But so far, it's acting like I want.

Speaking of antivirus, I have been holding off installing the one I used to use on W7. Is there a consensus on the W11 built-in antivirus? Does it seem to be good enough? Can I permanently ditch my old antivirus?
 

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    Windows 11 Pro 64-bit 23H2
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop
    Manufacturer/Model
    Self build
    CPU
    Intel Core i9-13900K
    Motherboard
    ASUS Z790-Plus WiFi TUF Gaming
    Memory
    4x32G Corsair Vengeance RGB DDR5 6000MHz
    Graphics Card(s)
    MSI/NVidia GeForce RTX 4070 Gaming X Trio 12G GDDR6X + built into motherboard Intel UHD Graphics
    Sound Card
    Built into graphics card + built into motherboard Realtek Audio
    Monitor(s) Displays
    Both connected to the NVidia adapter - Primary: Dell SE2417HGX 23" diagonal connected via HDMI-to-DisplayPort dongle, Secondary: Toshiba TV 32" diagonal connected via HDMI through Onkyo TX-NR717 surround receiver
    Screen Resolution
    1920x1080 on each monitor
    Hard Drives
    Samsung 970 EVO Plus NVMe M.2 2T
    6xSATA-to-USB 3.0 Fideco external enclosures holding SATA drives of various brands & sizes 1x20T, 2x18T, 2x6T, 1x500G, all connected to a multi-port USB hub
    For backups: USB 3.0 HDDs of various brands & sizes 1x20T, 2x4T, 1x1T + SSDs of various brands & sizes 2x480G, 1x1T, all connected to another multi-port USB hub, powered on only while actually performing backups & (may it never happen) restores
    PSU
    MSI MPG A1000G PCIe5 1000W, TrippLite Smart1500TSU 1200W UPS for the main system, TrippLite ECO850LCD 850W UPS for the DASD & my Internet connectivity boxes (no reason to throw out legacy equipment that stil works fine)
    Case
    Fractal North
    Cooling
    DeepCool AK620 CPU cooler (air, 2 fans), 2 case fans, 1 fan in PSU, 3 fans in graphics adapter
    Keyboard
    Cherry MX 11900 USB (wired)
    Mouse
    Touchpad built into the keyboard
    Internet Speed
    500Mbps via Spectrum cable TV/cell phone bundle
    Browser
    Firefox
    Antivirus
    Built into Windows 11
Using the registry settings I linked to, I've managed to make it tell me with an icon in the system tray. I think it predownloads then doesn't install or reboot until I say so.

I'm using the built in Win11 AV on some of my machines. Occasionally it annoys me, being very difficult to allow wanted false positives through. On those machines I put AVG on instead.
 

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    Windows 11 Professional (not the cut down rubbish)
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop
    Manufacturer/Model
    Home built, of course
    CPU
    Ryzen 9 3900XT (on this one anyway, I have 8)
    Motherboard
    MSI X470 Gaming Plus Max
    Memory
    72G and 72GB and 64GB and 32GB and 32GB and 8GB and 8GB and 8GB
    Graphics Card(s)
    Fury and 12 Tahitis
    Sound Card
    People still use cards for those?
    Monitor(s) Displays
    7 of them.
    Screen Resolution
    All sorts.
    Hard Drives
    1TB NVME, 4TB rust spinner
    PSU
    Several kW
    Case
    Unimportant
    Cooling
    Big Zalman 6 inch thing
    Keyboard
    Really?
    Mouse
    Yes
    Internet Speed
    32Mbit/7Mbit
    Browser
    Opera
    Antivirus
    AVG
    Other Info
    [Crosses legs] Exactly what info are you looking for?
I have now had the built-in antivirus complain about one thing I was trying to execute. It was an easy matter to tell it to run the thing anyway. I haven't had the experience of it blocking anything a second time. The one it complained about was an installer for an application, something I'm not likely to run again.

Back to the primary topic of this discussion. The changes I noted in my images above appear to do exactly what I want. It does not download nor does it install any update automatically. The Windows Update tab of Settings automatically shows pending updates when such are available. I also get a notification in the Notifications thing on the right end of the Task Bar. When something is pending, I just click the Check for updates button. The pending updates download & install while I watch. When they are done, each one says either Complete or Reboot Required. (Not sure about that wording. Maybe it says Restart instead of Reboot. Whatever. The meaning is the same.) The top of the screen says it will automatically reboot in 4 minutes. However, hours later, after no intervening reboot, it still says it will reboot in 4 minutes. This is exactly what I was looking for. The only quirky thing is that if I manually close all windows & reboot, the pending updates remain pending. I have found that I have to reboot by explicitly clicking the reboot button on the Windows Update tab of Settings. Then the pending updates are installed, sometimes with part of the update happening during shutdown & part of it happening during bootup. It seems that not all reboots are equal.
 

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    Windows 11 Pro 64-bit 23H2
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop
    Manufacturer/Model
    Self build
    CPU
    Intel Core i9-13900K
    Motherboard
    ASUS Z790-Plus WiFi TUF Gaming
    Memory
    4x32G Corsair Vengeance RGB DDR5 6000MHz
    Graphics Card(s)
    MSI/NVidia GeForce RTX 4070 Gaming X Trio 12G GDDR6X + built into motherboard Intel UHD Graphics
    Sound Card
    Built into graphics card + built into motherboard Realtek Audio
    Monitor(s) Displays
    Both connected to the NVidia adapter - Primary: Dell SE2417HGX 23" diagonal connected via HDMI-to-DisplayPort dongle, Secondary: Toshiba TV 32" diagonal connected via HDMI through Onkyo TX-NR717 surround receiver
    Screen Resolution
    1920x1080 on each monitor
    Hard Drives
    Samsung 970 EVO Plus NVMe M.2 2T
    6xSATA-to-USB 3.0 Fideco external enclosures holding SATA drives of various brands & sizes 1x20T, 2x18T, 2x6T, 1x500G, all connected to a multi-port USB hub
    For backups: USB 3.0 HDDs of various brands & sizes 1x20T, 2x4T, 1x1T + SSDs of various brands & sizes 2x480G, 1x1T, all connected to another multi-port USB hub, powered on only while actually performing backups & (may it never happen) restores
    PSU
    MSI MPG A1000G PCIe5 1000W, TrippLite Smart1500TSU 1200W UPS for the main system, TrippLite ECO850LCD 850W UPS for the DASD & my Internet connectivity boxes (no reason to throw out legacy equipment that stil works fine)
    Case
    Fractal North
    Cooling
    DeepCool AK620 CPU cooler (air, 2 fans), 2 case fans, 1 fan in PSU, 3 fans in graphics adapter
    Keyboard
    Cherry MX 11900 USB (wired)
    Mouse
    Touchpad built into the keyboard
    Internet Speed
    500Mbps via Spectrum cable TV/cell phone bundle
    Browser
    Firefox
    Antivirus
    Built into Windows 11
I have now had the built-in antivirus complain about one thing I was trying to execute. It was an easy matter to tell it to run the thing anyway. I haven't had the experience of it blocking anything a second time. The one it complained about was an installer for an application, something I'm not likely to run again.
For some reason, while it usually behaves like you say, I occasionally find it not admitting to blocking anything. Nothing in the list of things to allow in the future. And unlike AVG, it doeesn't tell you when it's blocking anything, it just silently does it and you wonder why the file won't run, or even worse, disappears. Things get even more complicated with computers on a network where one deletes a file from another.
 

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    Windows 11 Professional (not the cut down rubbish)
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop
    Manufacturer/Model
    Home built, of course
    CPU
    Ryzen 9 3900XT (on this one anyway, I have 8)
    Motherboard
    MSI X470 Gaming Plus Max
    Memory
    72G and 72GB and 64GB and 32GB and 32GB and 8GB and 8GB and 8GB
    Graphics Card(s)
    Fury and 12 Tahitis
    Sound Card
    People still use cards for those?
    Monitor(s) Displays
    7 of them.
    Screen Resolution
    All sorts.
    Hard Drives
    1TB NVME, 4TB rust spinner
    PSU
    Several kW
    Case
    Unimportant
    Cooling
    Big Zalman 6 inch thing
    Keyboard
    Really?
    Mouse
    Yes
    Internet Speed
    32Mbit/7Mbit
    Browser
    Opera
    Antivirus
    AVG
    Other Info
    [Crosses legs] Exactly what info are you looking for?
Thank you for the warning. I will have to remember what you say in case I ever get anything that acts like you describe. So far, I guess I've been lucky. But then, I've had W11 up & running for not even a week so it's still early morning for me.
 

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    Windows 11 Pro 64-bit 23H2
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop
    Manufacturer/Model
    Self build
    CPU
    Intel Core i9-13900K
    Motherboard
    ASUS Z790-Plus WiFi TUF Gaming
    Memory
    4x32G Corsair Vengeance RGB DDR5 6000MHz
    Graphics Card(s)
    MSI/NVidia GeForce RTX 4070 Gaming X Trio 12G GDDR6X + built into motherboard Intel UHD Graphics
    Sound Card
    Built into graphics card + built into motherboard Realtek Audio
    Monitor(s) Displays
    Both connected to the NVidia adapter - Primary: Dell SE2417HGX 23" diagonal connected via HDMI-to-DisplayPort dongle, Secondary: Toshiba TV 32" diagonal connected via HDMI through Onkyo TX-NR717 surround receiver
    Screen Resolution
    1920x1080 on each monitor
    Hard Drives
    Samsung 970 EVO Plus NVMe M.2 2T
    6xSATA-to-USB 3.0 Fideco external enclosures holding SATA drives of various brands & sizes 1x20T, 2x18T, 2x6T, 1x500G, all connected to a multi-port USB hub
    For backups: USB 3.0 HDDs of various brands & sizes 1x20T, 2x4T, 1x1T + SSDs of various brands & sizes 2x480G, 1x1T, all connected to another multi-port USB hub, powered on only while actually performing backups & (may it never happen) restores
    PSU
    MSI MPG A1000G PCIe5 1000W, TrippLite Smart1500TSU 1200W UPS for the main system, TrippLite ECO850LCD 850W UPS for the DASD & my Internet connectivity boxes (no reason to throw out legacy equipment that stil works fine)
    Case
    Fractal North
    Cooling
    DeepCool AK620 CPU cooler (air, 2 fans), 2 case fans, 1 fan in PSU, 3 fans in graphics adapter
    Keyboard
    Cherry MX 11900 USB (wired)
    Mouse
    Touchpad built into the keyboard
    Internet Speed
    500Mbps via Spectrum cable TV/cell phone bundle
    Browser
    Firefox
    Antivirus
    Built into Windows 11
Depends what sort of programs you run :-)
 

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    Windows 11 Professional (not the cut down rubbish)
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop
    Manufacturer/Model
    Home built, of course
    CPU
    Ryzen 9 3900XT (on this one anyway, I have 8)
    Motherboard
    MSI X470 Gaming Plus Max
    Memory
    72G and 72GB and 64GB and 32GB and 32GB and 8GB and 8GB and 8GB
    Graphics Card(s)
    Fury and 12 Tahitis
    Sound Card
    People still use cards for those?
    Monitor(s) Displays
    7 of them.
    Screen Resolution
    All sorts.
    Hard Drives
    1TB NVME, 4TB rust spinner
    PSU
    Several kW
    Case
    Unimportant
    Cooling
    Big Zalman 6 inch thing
    Keyboard
    Really?
    Mouse
    Yes
    Internet Speed
    32Mbit/7Mbit
    Browser
    Opera
    Antivirus
    AVG
    Other Info
    [Crosses legs] Exactly what info are you looking for?

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