Solved Verifying Backup and Restore


Haydon

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Windows 10 Pro
Whatever your backup software is, do you verify your restores?

You could verify every backup you make by doing a full blown restore and fully testing the restore. This is very time consuming and perhaps nobody does it.

Going down in terms of level of verification effort, you could do spot checks, e.g. deleting a folder, restoring it from the backup, and inspecting the restored folder.

Going further down in terms of level of verification effort, is not really verification any more, but you could check the events/errors logs, and there is the issue whether you can trust the logs.

There is this anecdote about the IT director who could not restore his backups and was fired.

What do you do to prevent from being fired like that? What level of verification lets you sleep at night?
 

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    Windows 10 Pro
In my personal notebook I backup my system in a weekly basis, so as you said, veryfing thethe result image is time comsuming. But at job I would check the restore image. After all is the company data what I'm dealing with. It's my JOB. It's a whole different situation.
 

My Computers

System One System Two

  • OS
    Windows 11 Pro
    Computer type
    Laptop
    Manufacturer/Model
    Lenovo ThinkPad X1 3Gen Extreme
    CPU
    I7 10750H
    Motherboard
    Intel MW-490
    Memory
    32 GB
    Graphics Card(s)
    Intel UHD - NVIDIA 1650 Ti Max-Q
    Sound Card
    Realtek in-built
    Screen Resolution
    3840x2160 200% Scale
    Hard Drives
    C: WDC PC SN730 SDBQNTY-1T00-1001 (1 TB)
    D: KINGSTON SNV2S2000G (2 TB)
    Antivirus
    BitDefender Free
  • Operating System
    Windows 11 Pro
    Computer type
    Laptop
    Manufacturer/Model
    Lenovo IdeaPad S340 81NB
    CPU
    AMD Ryzen 5 3500U with Radeon Vega Mobile Gfx 2.10 GHz
    Motherboard
    LENOVO LNVNB161216
    Memory
    8 GB
    Graphics card(s)
    Radeon Vega Mobile Gfx
    Sound Card
    Realtek
    Screen Resolution
    1366x768
    Hard Drives
    C: SSD 128GB (RPFTJ128PDD2EWX)
    D: HDD 1 TB (Seagate ST1000LM035-1RK172)
    Antivirus
    BitDefender
The software that I use has a verify backup feature. I would hope that crucial data is backup several different methods and located in multiple off-site locations. I guess nothing is absolute, but the often the backup is accomplished, the better the odds of not losing more than a day or two of data—just my $0.25 thought.
 

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    Windows 11 Pro
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop
    Manufacturer/Model
    Personal Build
    CPU
    Ryzen 7 3700x
    Motherboard
    ASUS ROG Crosshair VI AMD X370
    Memory
    32 GB
    Graphics Card(s)
    NVIDA GeForce GTX 1050 Ti
    Sound Card
    On board
    Monitor(s) Displays
    (2) AOC E2752Vh 27-inch
    Screen Resolution
    1920 x 1080
    Hard Drives
    SSD M.2 and SATA
    Cooling
    Air cooling
    Keyboard
    Logitech K800 Wireless
    Mouse
    Logitech M705 Wireless
    Internet Speed
    100 Mbps Download | 10 Mbps Upload
    Browser
    Firefox Beta
    Antivirus
    Windows Security???
    Other Info
    Microsoft 365 Family
    Macrium Reflect (Paid)
    eM Client
    Adobe Acrobat DC (Subscription)
Macrium Reflect has a verify feature that will verify (whatever that really means) the backup so I just use that with each backup. The backups are running in the middle of the night so time isn't an issue.
 

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    Windows 10 Professional
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop
    Manufacturer/Model
    Digital Storm VELOX
    CPU
    Intel Core i9 11900K
    Motherboard
    ASUS PRIME Z590-P
    Memory
    64GB
    Graphics Card(s)
    NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1650
    Sound Card
    Realtek onboard
    Monitor(s) Displays
    Acer R221Q 21.5"
    Screen Resolution
    1920 x 1080
    Hard Drives
    2 x Samsung SSD 990 EVO Plus (1 TB)
    2 x Seagate ST4000NE001 (4 TB)
    PSU
    None
    Case
    VELOX
    Cooling
    Cooler Master
    Keyboard
    Logitech
    Mouse
    Kensington trackball
    Browser
    Firefox, Chrome
    Antivirus
    Windows Defender, Malwarebytes
What level of verification lets you sleep at night?
I have my Macrium backups set to verify the image immediately after backing up.

I could probably stop doing that, but it's become a habit. I've never yet seen any fail verification, or had any image that could not be restored.
 

My Computers

System One System Two

  • OS
    Windows 11 Home
    Computer type
    Laptop
    Manufacturer/Model
    Acer Aspire 3 A315-23
    CPU
    AMD Athlon Silver 3050U
    Memory
    8GB
    Graphics Card(s)
    Radeon Graphics
    Monitor(s) Displays
    laptop screen
    Screen Resolution
    1366x768 native resolution, up to 2560x1440 with Radeon Virtual Super Resolution
    Hard Drives
    1TB Samsung EVO 870 SSD
    Internet Speed
    50 Mbps
    Browser
    Edge, Firefox
    Antivirus
    Defender
    Other Info
    fully 'Windows 11 ready' laptop. Windows 10 C: partition migrated from my old unsupported 'main machine' then upgraded to 11. A test migration ran Insider builds for 2 months. When 11 was released on 5th October it was re-imaged back to 10 and was offered the upgrade in Windows Update on 20th October. Windows Update offered the 22H2 Feature Update on 20th September 2022. It got the 23H2 Feature Update on 4th November 2023 through Windows Update.

    My SYSTEM THREE is a Dell Latitude 5410, i7-10610U, 32GB RAM, 512GB NVMe ssd, supported device running Windows 11 Pro (and all my Hyper-V VMs).

    My SYSTEM FOUR is a 2-in-1 convertible Lenovo Yoga 11e 20DA, Celeron N2930, 8GB RAM, 256GB ssd. Unsupported device: currently running Win10 Pro, plus Win11 Pro RTM and Insider Dev, Beta, and RP 24H2 as native boot vhdx.

    My SYSTEM FIVE is a Dell Latitude 3190 2-in-1, Pentium Silver N5030, 4GB RAM, 512GB NVMe ssd, supported device running Windows 11 Pro, plus the Insider Beta, Dev, Canary, and Release Preview builds as a native boot .vhdx.
  • Operating System
    Windows 11 Pro
    Computer type
    Laptop
    Manufacturer/Model
    Dell Lattitude E4310
    CPU
    Intel® Core™ i5-520M
    Motherboard
    0T6M8G
    Memory
    8GB
    Graphics card(s)
    (integrated graphics) Intel HD Graphics
    Screen Resolution
    1366x768
    Hard Drives
    500GB Crucial MX500 SSD
    Browser
    Firefox, Edge
    Antivirus
    Defender
    Other Info
    unsupported machine: Legacy bios, MBR, TPM 1.2, upgraded from W10 to W11 using W10/W11 hybrid install media workaround. In-place upgrade to 22H2 using ISO and a workaround. Feature Update to 23H2 by manually installing the Enablement Package. Also running Insider Beta, Dev, and Canary builds as a native boot .vhdx.

    My SYSTEM THREE is a Dell Latitude 5410, i7-10610U, 32GB RAM, 512GB NVMe ssd, supported device running Windows 11 Pro (and all my Hyper-V VMs).

    My SYSTEM FOUR is a 2-in-1 convertible Lenovo Yoga 11e 20DA, Celeron N2930, 8GB RAM, 256GB ssd. Unsupported device: currently running Win10 Pro, plus Win11 Pro RTM and Insider Dev, Beta, and RP 24H2 as native boot vhdx.

    My SYSTEM FIVE is a Dell Latitude 3190 2-in-1, Pentium Silver N5030, 4GB RAM, 512GB NVMe ssd, supported device running Windows 11 Pro, plus the Insider Beta, Dev, Canary, and Release Preview builds as a native boot .vhdx.
The truth is veirifying backups dates back to days of backing up on dvds where writing was statistically prone to write errors.

Nowadays with modern hard drives, write errors are very rare.

I know people still do verify backups but I bet vast majority cannot remember last time a verification failed.

On that basis, I just keep last two or three backups, and never bother with verification as probability of all backups being corrupted is so low, you have more chance of a politician telling the truth.
 

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    Windows 10 Pro + others in VHDs
    Computer type
    Laptop
    Manufacturer/Model
    ASUS Vivobook 14
    CPU
    I7
    Motherboard
    Yep, Laptop has one.
    Memory
    16 GB
    Graphics Card(s)
    Integrated Intel Iris XE
    Sound Card
    Realtek built in
    Monitor(s) Displays
    N/A
    Screen Resolution
    1920x1080
    Hard Drives
    1 TB Optane NVME SSD, 1 TB NVME SSD
    PSU
    Yep, got one
    Case
    Yep, got one
    Cooling
    Stella Artois
    Keyboard
    Built in
    Mouse
    Bluetooth , wired
    Internet Speed
    72 Mb/s :-(
    Browser
    Edge mostly
    Antivirus
    Defender
    Other Info
    TPM 2.0
Macrium Reflect has a verify feature that will verify (whatever that really means) the backup....

Macrium said:
When the backup is created, an MD5 hash digest is created and stored in the index of the image file. When verification takes place, a new MD5 hash is calculated and then compared to the MD5 hash that is stored in the index. This ensures that the data contained within the image is the same as when it was written. Any differences between these hash values indicates that the image is corrupt, and the verification will fail.
 

My Computers

System One System Two

  • OS
    Windows 11 Home
    Computer type
    Laptop
    Manufacturer/Model
    Acer Aspire 3 A315-23
    CPU
    AMD Athlon Silver 3050U
    Memory
    8GB
    Graphics Card(s)
    Radeon Graphics
    Monitor(s) Displays
    laptop screen
    Screen Resolution
    1366x768 native resolution, up to 2560x1440 with Radeon Virtual Super Resolution
    Hard Drives
    1TB Samsung EVO 870 SSD
    Internet Speed
    50 Mbps
    Browser
    Edge, Firefox
    Antivirus
    Defender
    Other Info
    fully 'Windows 11 ready' laptop. Windows 10 C: partition migrated from my old unsupported 'main machine' then upgraded to 11. A test migration ran Insider builds for 2 months. When 11 was released on 5th October it was re-imaged back to 10 and was offered the upgrade in Windows Update on 20th October. Windows Update offered the 22H2 Feature Update on 20th September 2022. It got the 23H2 Feature Update on 4th November 2023 through Windows Update.

    My SYSTEM THREE is a Dell Latitude 5410, i7-10610U, 32GB RAM, 512GB NVMe ssd, supported device running Windows 11 Pro (and all my Hyper-V VMs).

    My SYSTEM FOUR is a 2-in-1 convertible Lenovo Yoga 11e 20DA, Celeron N2930, 8GB RAM, 256GB ssd. Unsupported device: currently running Win10 Pro, plus Win11 Pro RTM and Insider Dev, Beta, and RP 24H2 as native boot vhdx.

    My SYSTEM FIVE is a Dell Latitude 3190 2-in-1, Pentium Silver N5030, 4GB RAM, 512GB NVMe ssd, supported device running Windows 11 Pro, plus the Insider Beta, Dev, Canary, and Release Preview builds as a native boot .vhdx.
  • Operating System
    Windows 11 Pro
    Computer type
    Laptop
    Manufacturer/Model
    Dell Lattitude E4310
    CPU
    Intel® Core™ i5-520M
    Motherboard
    0T6M8G
    Memory
    8GB
    Graphics card(s)
    (integrated graphics) Intel HD Graphics
    Screen Resolution
    1366x768
    Hard Drives
    500GB Crucial MX500 SSD
    Browser
    Firefox, Edge
    Antivirus
    Defender
    Other Info
    unsupported machine: Legacy bios, MBR, TPM 1.2, upgraded from W10 to W11 using W10/W11 hybrid install media workaround. In-place upgrade to 22H2 using ISO and a workaround. Feature Update to 23H2 by manually installing the Enablement Package. Also running Insider Beta, Dev, and Canary builds as a native boot .vhdx.

    My SYSTEM THREE is a Dell Latitude 5410, i7-10610U, 32GB RAM, 512GB NVMe ssd, supported device running Windows 11 Pro (and all my Hyper-V VMs).

    My SYSTEM FOUR is a 2-in-1 convertible Lenovo Yoga 11e 20DA, Celeron N2930, 8GB RAM, 256GB ssd. Unsupported device: currently running Win10 Pro, plus Win11 Pro RTM and Insider Dev, Beta, and RP 24H2 as native boot vhdx.

    My SYSTEM FIVE is a Dell Latitude 3190 2-in-1, Pentium Silver N5030, 4GB RAM, 512GB NVMe ssd, supported device running Windows 11 Pro, plus the Insider Beta, Dev, Canary, and Release Preview builds as a native boot .vhdx.
You could verify every backup you make by doing a full blown restore and fully testing the restore. This is very time consuming and perhaps nobody does it.
Macrium Reflect includes viBoot (even the Free version). This allows you to boot a Macrium image as a Hyper-V or VirtualBox VM. This is an alternative way to test that an image is viable, and takes just a few minutes to set up and boot to Windows.
 

My Computers

System One System Two

  • OS
    Windows 11 Home
    Computer type
    Laptop
    Manufacturer/Model
    Acer Aspire 3 A315-23
    CPU
    AMD Athlon Silver 3050U
    Memory
    8GB
    Graphics Card(s)
    Radeon Graphics
    Monitor(s) Displays
    laptop screen
    Screen Resolution
    1366x768 native resolution, up to 2560x1440 with Radeon Virtual Super Resolution
    Hard Drives
    1TB Samsung EVO 870 SSD
    Internet Speed
    50 Mbps
    Browser
    Edge, Firefox
    Antivirus
    Defender
    Other Info
    fully 'Windows 11 ready' laptop. Windows 10 C: partition migrated from my old unsupported 'main machine' then upgraded to 11. A test migration ran Insider builds for 2 months. When 11 was released on 5th October it was re-imaged back to 10 and was offered the upgrade in Windows Update on 20th October. Windows Update offered the 22H2 Feature Update on 20th September 2022. It got the 23H2 Feature Update on 4th November 2023 through Windows Update.

    My SYSTEM THREE is a Dell Latitude 5410, i7-10610U, 32GB RAM, 512GB NVMe ssd, supported device running Windows 11 Pro (and all my Hyper-V VMs).

    My SYSTEM FOUR is a 2-in-1 convertible Lenovo Yoga 11e 20DA, Celeron N2930, 8GB RAM, 256GB ssd. Unsupported device: currently running Win10 Pro, plus Win11 Pro RTM and Insider Dev, Beta, and RP 24H2 as native boot vhdx.

    My SYSTEM FIVE is a Dell Latitude 3190 2-in-1, Pentium Silver N5030, 4GB RAM, 512GB NVMe ssd, supported device running Windows 11 Pro, plus the Insider Beta, Dev, Canary, and Release Preview builds as a native boot .vhdx.
  • Operating System
    Windows 11 Pro
    Computer type
    Laptop
    Manufacturer/Model
    Dell Lattitude E4310
    CPU
    Intel® Core™ i5-520M
    Motherboard
    0T6M8G
    Memory
    8GB
    Graphics card(s)
    (integrated graphics) Intel HD Graphics
    Screen Resolution
    1366x768
    Hard Drives
    500GB Crucial MX500 SSD
    Browser
    Firefox, Edge
    Antivirus
    Defender
    Other Info
    unsupported machine: Legacy bios, MBR, TPM 1.2, upgraded from W10 to W11 using W10/W11 hybrid install media workaround. In-place upgrade to 22H2 using ISO and a workaround. Feature Update to 23H2 by manually installing the Enablement Package. Also running Insider Beta, Dev, and Canary builds as a native boot .vhdx.

    My SYSTEM THREE is a Dell Latitude 5410, i7-10610U, 32GB RAM, 512GB NVMe ssd, supported device running Windows 11 Pro (and all my Hyper-V VMs).

    My SYSTEM FOUR is a 2-in-1 convertible Lenovo Yoga 11e 20DA, Celeron N2930, 8GB RAM, 256GB ssd. Unsupported device: currently running Win10 Pro, plus Win11 Pro RTM and Insider Dev, Beta, and RP 24H2 as native boot vhdx.

    My SYSTEM FIVE is a Dell Latitude 3190 2-in-1, Pentium Silver N5030, 4GB RAM, 512GB NVMe ssd, supported device running Windows 11 Pro, plus the Insider Beta, Dev, Canary, and Release Preview builds as a native boot .vhdx.
I do three backups per week, and I verify each time. It only takes 2-3 mins longer, it's a good habit to have :)
 

My Computers

System One System Two

  • OS
    Windows 11
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop
    Manufacturer/Model
    Self build
    CPU
    3900x
    Motherboard
    Asus 570 plus
    Memory
    32
    Graphics Card(s)
    Rtx 2070
    Sound Card
    on board
    Monitor(s) Displays
    samsung 4k 28"
    Screen Resolution
    1900x1080
    Hard Drives
    2 x 1 gb nvme
    PSU
    Corsair 650w
    Case
    midi tower
    Cooling
    Watercooled
    Keyboard
    rgb wireless
    Mouse
    wireless logitech
    Internet Speed
    50m
    Browser
    Edge
    Antivirus
    Defender
  • Operating System
    Windows 11 pro
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop
    Manufacturer/Model
    Beelink
    CPU
    Amd ryzen 5 5600H (Cezanne)
    Motherboard
    beelink
    Memory
    32 gig
    Graphics card(s)
    Vega
    Sound Card
    on board
    Monitor(s) Displays
    samsung 4k
    Screen Resolution
    1920 x 1080
    Hard Drives
    2 x 1tb nvme
    PSU
    12v
    Case
    mini pc
    Cooling
    air
    Mouse
    wireless logitech
    Keyboard
    rgb wireless
    Internet Speed
    50m
    Browser
    edge
    Antivirus
    windows defender
I verified the Server (WSE2016) OS awhile back by restoring it in VMWare 11 from a SSD Server BU.
It took a few tries & I screenshotted it throughout the process but finally got it running.
So I suppose one can go that route to test their BU even though it's a pita.
--
I suppose I could test a W10 BU from the server data BU in VMWare 11 also, there are a few to choose from.
 

My Computers

System One System Two

  • OS
    Windows 11 Pro
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop
    Manufacturer/Model
    Self made in 2023
    CPU
    i7-12900K @ 3.2 GHz
    Motherboard
    ASUS ROG Maximus Z790 APEX
    Memory
    2/16 GB Critical DDR5
    Graphics Card(s)
    GeForce RTX 3060 Ti
    Sound Card
    On board sound
    Monitor(s) Displays
    27 inch LED
    Hard Drives
    1 TB Samsung SSD w/ 3 partitions
    250 GB Samsung SSD for WSE 2016 BU OS
    1 TB Samsung SSD (Storage)
    PSU
    RM850x SHIFT 80 PLUS Gold Fully Modular
    Case
    Fractal Design Define 7 Compact - Mid Tower
    Browser
    EDGE
  • Operating System
    Windows 11 Pro x2
    Computer type
    Laptop
    Manufacturer/Model
    LG gram 15, 15.6" Laptop
    CPU
    Core i5-1135G7
    Motherboard
    LG
    Memory
    16GB M.2 2280 NVMe SSD
    Graphics card(s)
    Integrated - Intel Iris Xe Graphics
    Sound Card
    Onboard sound
    Monitor(s) Displays
    15.6" IPS Display
    Screen Resolution
    Full HD 1920 x 1080
    Hard Drives
    512 GB
    Browser
    EDGE
Macrium Reflect includes viBoot (even the Free version). This allows you to boot a Macrium image as a Hyper-V or VirtualBox VM. This is an alternative way to test that an image is viable, and takes just a few minutes to set up and boot to Windows.
How do I start out with viBoot? What is the first step?
 

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    Windows 10 Pro
How do I start out with viBoot? What is the first step?
Well, the very first step is to enable Hyper-V in Windows Features if you have Pro, or install VirtualBox if you have Home. Reflect v8 supports both, if you have v7 then it only supports Hyper-V.

Then it's simply a matter of running viBoot and selecting the .mrimg file you wish to boot as a VM. There's a Ten Forums tutorial for that:

 

My Computers

System One System Two

  • OS
    Windows 11 Home
    Computer type
    Laptop
    Manufacturer/Model
    Acer Aspire 3 A315-23
    CPU
    AMD Athlon Silver 3050U
    Memory
    8GB
    Graphics Card(s)
    Radeon Graphics
    Monitor(s) Displays
    laptop screen
    Screen Resolution
    1366x768 native resolution, up to 2560x1440 with Radeon Virtual Super Resolution
    Hard Drives
    1TB Samsung EVO 870 SSD
    Internet Speed
    50 Mbps
    Browser
    Edge, Firefox
    Antivirus
    Defender
    Other Info
    fully 'Windows 11 ready' laptop. Windows 10 C: partition migrated from my old unsupported 'main machine' then upgraded to 11. A test migration ran Insider builds for 2 months. When 11 was released on 5th October it was re-imaged back to 10 and was offered the upgrade in Windows Update on 20th October. Windows Update offered the 22H2 Feature Update on 20th September 2022. It got the 23H2 Feature Update on 4th November 2023 through Windows Update.

    My SYSTEM THREE is a Dell Latitude 5410, i7-10610U, 32GB RAM, 512GB NVMe ssd, supported device running Windows 11 Pro (and all my Hyper-V VMs).

    My SYSTEM FOUR is a 2-in-1 convertible Lenovo Yoga 11e 20DA, Celeron N2930, 8GB RAM, 256GB ssd. Unsupported device: currently running Win10 Pro, plus Win11 Pro RTM and Insider Dev, Beta, and RP 24H2 as native boot vhdx.

    My SYSTEM FIVE is a Dell Latitude 3190 2-in-1, Pentium Silver N5030, 4GB RAM, 512GB NVMe ssd, supported device running Windows 11 Pro, plus the Insider Beta, Dev, Canary, and Release Preview builds as a native boot .vhdx.
  • Operating System
    Windows 11 Pro
    Computer type
    Laptop
    Manufacturer/Model
    Dell Lattitude E4310
    CPU
    Intel® Core™ i5-520M
    Motherboard
    0T6M8G
    Memory
    8GB
    Graphics card(s)
    (integrated graphics) Intel HD Graphics
    Screen Resolution
    1366x768
    Hard Drives
    500GB Crucial MX500 SSD
    Browser
    Firefox, Edge
    Antivirus
    Defender
    Other Info
    unsupported machine: Legacy bios, MBR, TPM 1.2, upgraded from W10 to W11 using W10/W11 hybrid install media workaround. In-place upgrade to 22H2 using ISO and a workaround. Feature Update to 23H2 by manually installing the Enablement Package. Also running Insider Beta, Dev, and Canary builds as a native boot .vhdx.

    My SYSTEM THREE is a Dell Latitude 5410, i7-10610U, 32GB RAM, 512GB NVMe ssd, supported device running Windows 11 Pro (and all my Hyper-V VMs).

    My SYSTEM FOUR is a 2-in-1 convertible Lenovo Yoga 11e 20DA, Celeron N2930, 8GB RAM, 256GB ssd. Unsupported device: currently running Win10 Pro, plus Win11 Pro RTM and Insider Dev, Beta, and RP 24H2 as native boot vhdx.

    My SYSTEM FIVE is a Dell Latitude 3190 2-in-1, Pentium Silver N5030, 4GB RAM, 512GB NVMe ssd, supported device running Windows 11 Pro, plus the Insider Beta, Dev, Canary, and Release Preview builds as a native boot .vhdx.
Well, the very first step is to enable Hyper-V in Windows Features if you have Pro, or install VirtualBox if you have Home. Reflect v8 supports both, if you have v7 then it only supports Hyper-V.

Then it's simply a matter of running viBoot and selecting the .mrimg file you wish to boot as a VM. There's a Ten Forums tutorial for that:

:D that was easier than I feared :D

:eek1: fear is man's worst inner demon :eek1:

I had to install viBoot first because that wasn't part of the default MR installation, but now I can play with viBoot (y)

Edit: If I count correctly, there are 4 ways to verify a MR backup
1. Actually restore the image and test the restore
2. By way of the MR 'Verify' button
3. Mount the image in File Explorer and test the mounted image
4. By way of viBoot and test the VM

... and you can check the 'Events' logs for errors.
 
Last edited:

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    Windows 10 Pro
:D that was easier than I feared :D
It really is that easy. If you then want the VM to have internet access you'll need to add a network adapter in the VM's settings, but that's not too difficult either. But you don't need internet access if you just want to verify that the image is a completely sound and bootable system.
 

My Computers

System One System Two

  • OS
    Windows 11 Home
    Computer type
    Laptop
    Manufacturer/Model
    Acer Aspire 3 A315-23
    CPU
    AMD Athlon Silver 3050U
    Memory
    8GB
    Graphics Card(s)
    Radeon Graphics
    Monitor(s) Displays
    laptop screen
    Screen Resolution
    1366x768 native resolution, up to 2560x1440 with Radeon Virtual Super Resolution
    Hard Drives
    1TB Samsung EVO 870 SSD
    Internet Speed
    50 Mbps
    Browser
    Edge, Firefox
    Antivirus
    Defender
    Other Info
    fully 'Windows 11 ready' laptop. Windows 10 C: partition migrated from my old unsupported 'main machine' then upgraded to 11. A test migration ran Insider builds for 2 months. When 11 was released on 5th October it was re-imaged back to 10 and was offered the upgrade in Windows Update on 20th October. Windows Update offered the 22H2 Feature Update on 20th September 2022. It got the 23H2 Feature Update on 4th November 2023 through Windows Update.

    My SYSTEM THREE is a Dell Latitude 5410, i7-10610U, 32GB RAM, 512GB NVMe ssd, supported device running Windows 11 Pro (and all my Hyper-V VMs).

    My SYSTEM FOUR is a 2-in-1 convertible Lenovo Yoga 11e 20DA, Celeron N2930, 8GB RAM, 256GB ssd. Unsupported device: currently running Win10 Pro, plus Win11 Pro RTM and Insider Dev, Beta, and RP 24H2 as native boot vhdx.

    My SYSTEM FIVE is a Dell Latitude 3190 2-in-1, Pentium Silver N5030, 4GB RAM, 512GB NVMe ssd, supported device running Windows 11 Pro, plus the Insider Beta, Dev, Canary, and Release Preview builds as a native boot .vhdx.
  • Operating System
    Windows 11 Pro
    Computer type
    Laptop
    Manufacturer/Model
    Dell Lattitude E4310
    CPU
    Intel® Core™ i5-520M
    Motherboard
    0T6M8G
    Memory
    8GB
    Graphics card(s)
    (integrated graphics) Intel HD Graphics
    Screen Resolution
    1366x768
    Hard Drives
    500GB Crucial MX500 SSD
    Browser
    Firefox, Edge
    Antivirus
    Defender
    Other Info
    unsupported machine: Legacy bios, MBR, TPM 1.2, upgraded from W10 to W11 using W10/W11 hybrid install media workaround. In-place upgrade to 22H2 using ISO and a workaround. Feature Update to 23H2 by manually installing the Enablement Package. Also running Insider Beta, Dev, and Canary builds as a native boot .vhdx.

    My SYSTEM THREE is a Dell Latitude 5410, i7-10610U, 32GB RAM, 512GB NVMe ssd, supported device running Windows 11 Pro (and all my Hyper-V VMs).

    My SYSTEM FOUR is a 2-in-1 convertible Lenovo Yoga 11e 20DA, Celeron N2930, 8GB RAM, 256GB ssd. Unsupported device: currently running Win10 Pro, plus Win11 Pro RTM and Insider Dev, Beta, and RP 24H2 as native boot vhdx.

    My SYSTEM FIVE is a Dell Latitude 3190 2-in-1, Pentium Silver N5030, 4GB RAM, 512GB NVMe ssd, supported device running Windows 11 Pro, plus the Insider Beta, Dev, Canary, and Release Preview builds as a native boot .vhdx.
It really is that easy. If you then want the VM to have internet access you'll need to add a network adapter in the VM's settings, but that's not too difficult either. But you don't need internet access if you just want to verify that the image is a completely sound and bootable system.
I successfully tried internet access with the default switch :)

Still playing with 'Basic Session' and wondering about 'Enhanced Session', being concerned about violating licensing terms of paid for software, etc. etc.
 

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    Windows 10 Pro
Still playing with 'Basic Session' and wondering about 'Enhanced Session', being concerned about violating licensing terms of paid for software, etc. etc.
I generally only run my viBoot VMs for a few minutes/hours then delete the machine when I'm done. I have Reflect images of every version of Windows 10 from my test machine and it's useful to run them up occasionally to answer version-specific support questions.

For my more 'permanent' VMs I have activated them, some with a W7 key from a deceased PC. Note that if you ever activate a VM you should never just delete it else you'll throw away its digital licence.


In Hyper-V the Enhanced Session allows you to share the clipboard between the Host and the VM, allows the VM to use the Host's sound, and can give the VM direct access to any drive on the Host, internal or external. Enhanced Session is only available if the guest OS is Pro, a Home VM cannot use an Enhanced Session.

 

My Computers

System One System Two

  • OS
    Windows 11 Home
    Computer type
    Laptop
    Manufacturer/Model
    Acer Aspire 3 A315-23
    CPU
    AMD Athlon Silver 3050U
    Memory
    8GB
    Graphics Card(s)
    Radeon Graphics
    Monitor(s) Displays
    laptop screen
    Screen Resolution
    1366x768 native resolution, up to 2560x1440 with Radeon Virtual Super Resolution
    Hard Drives
    1TB Samsung EVO 870 SSD
    Internet Speed
    50 Mbps
    Browser
    Edge, Firefox
    Antivirus
    Defender
    Other Info
    fully 'Windows 11 ready' laptop. Windows 10 C: partition migrated from my old unsupported 'main machine' then upgraded to 11. A test migration ran Insider builds for 2 months. When 11 was released on 5th October it was re-imaged back to 10 and was offered the upgrade in Windows Update on 20th October. Windows Update offered the 22H2 Feature Update on 20th September 2022. It got the 23H2 Feature Update on 4th November 2023 through Windows Update.

    My SYSTEM THREE is a Dell Latitude 5410, i7-10610U, 32GB RAM, 512GB NVMe ssd, supported device running Windows 11 Pro (and all my Hyper-V VMs).

    My SYSTEM FOUR is a 2-in-1 convertible Lenovo Yoga 11e 20DA, Celeron N2930, 8GB RAM, 256GB ssd. Unsupported device: currently running Win10 Pro, plus Win11 Pro RTM and Insider Dev, Beta, and RP 24H2 as native boot vhdx.

    My SYSTEM FIVE is a Dell Latitude 3190 2-in-1, Pentium Silver N5030, 4GB RAM, 512GB NVMe ssd, supported device running Windows 11 Pro, plus the Insider Beta, Dev, Canary, and Release Preview builds as a native boot .vhdx.
  • Operating System
    Windows 11 Pro
    Computer type
    Laptop
    Manufacturer/Model
    Dell Lattitude E4310
    CPU
    Intel® Core™ i5-520M
    Motherboard
    0T6M8G
    Memory
    8GB
    Graphics card(s)
    (integrated graphics) Intel HD Graphics
    Screen Resolution
    1366x768
    Hard Drives
    500GB Crucial MX500 SSD
    Browser
    Firefox, Edge
    Antivirus
    Defender
    Other Info
    unsupported machine: Legacy bios, MBR, TPM 1.2, upgraded from W10 to W11 using W10/W11 hybrid install media workaround. In-place upgrade to 22H2 using ISO and a workaround. Feature Update to 23H2 by manually installing the Enablement Package. Also running Insider Beta, Dev, and Canary builds as a native boot .vhdx.

    My SYSTEM THREE is a Dell Latitude 5410, i7-10610U, 32GB RAM, 512GB NVMe ssd, supported device running Windows 11 Pro (and all my Hyper-V VMs).

    My SYSTEM FOUR is a 2-in-1 convertible Lenovo Yoga 11e 20DA, Celeron N2930, 8GB RAM, 256GB ssd. Unsupported device: currently running Win10 Pro, plus Win11 Pro RTM and Insider Dev, Beta, and RP 24H2 as native boot vhdx.

    My SYSTEM FIVE is a Dell Latitude 3190 2-in-1, Pentium Silver N5030, 4GB RAM, 512GB NVMe ssd, supported device running Windows 11 Pro, plus the Insider Beta, Dev, Canary, and Release Preview builds as a native boot .vhdx.
I generally only run my viBoot VMs for a few minutes/hours then delete the machine when I'm done. I have Reflect images of every version of Windows 10 from my test machine and it's useful to run them up occasionally to answer version-specific support questions.

For my more 'permanent' VMs I have activated them, some with a W7 key from a deceased PC. Note that if you ever activate a VM you should never just delete it else you'll throw away its digital licence.


In Hyper-V the Enhanced Session allows you to share the clipboard between the Host and the VM, allows the VM to use the Host's sound, and can give the VM direct access to any drive on the Host, internal or external. Enhanced Session is only available if the guest OS is Pro, a Home VM cannot use an Enhanced Session.

For the paid for software, I got in the VM a trial license that expires in zero days, LOL, as long as I don't use that too often too long, I am OK, I guess.

Of all the verification options, viBoot convinces me the most, as you can verify 'everything' (OS, apps, user data) in the VM (y)

The VM even starts up with the MR dual boot option, which startled me the first time, LOL
 

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    Windows 10 Pro
I can confirm that the viBoot VM works in the particular BitLocker configuration that I use on my main machine. I can even do FTP from and to it, and that's enough for even sceptical me > everything in the viBoot VM works! The speed hit is also imperceptible for my modest computing needs, the software layer between metal and VM 'is not there'.
-----------------
Raising the bar for my other backup tools, robocopy holds its own, but File History has become a mixed bag for me. I used the batch file that @Bree posted in a parallel thread to reset File History, but it did not work. My biggest gripe is that File History sometimes fails to do the hourly backups without providing any notifications, and since it works in the background, I have no way of knowing about the skipped backups unless I check 'restore' or the 'events/errors logs' (in the snap-in console) On the other hand, File History has never failed to restore a backed up file/folder since the W8 days when it was introduced. (These are related but nonetheless somewhat different issues)
-----------------
I will mark this thread 'Solved' thanks to all who responded (y)
 

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    Windows 10 Pro
I have Reflect set to verify the image :)
 

My Computers

System One System Two

  • OS
    Windows 11 Pro
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop
    Manufacturer/Model
    Skylake Special X299
    CPU
    Intel Core i9 9900X
    Motherboard
    Asus ROG Strix X299-E Gaming II
    Memory
    GSkill Trident Z RGB 32GB 3600 16-16-16-36 (F4-3600C16Q-32GTZR)
    Graphics Card(s)
    EVGA RTX 3080 12GB FTW3 Ultra Gaming (12G-P5-4877-KL)
    Sound Card
    Supreme FX
    Monitor(s) Displays
    Asus PG279Q
    Screen Resolution
    2560 x 1440 165Hz
    Hard Drives
    Samsung 980 Pro 500GB x2, Seagate Barracuda 4TB x2, Western Digital Black 4TB x1
    PSU
    EVGA 1200 P2, EVGA Black Custom Braided Cables
    Case
    Thermaltake View 31 Tempered Glass Limited Edition
    Cooling
    Corsair H115i, Thermal Grizzly Kryonaut
    Keyboard
    Logitech G910 Orion Spark
    Mouse
    Logitech G700s, Asus ROG GX860 Buzzard
    Internet Speed
    Verizon Fios Quantum Gateway 75/75
    Browser
    Edge
    Antivirus
    Windows Defender, Malwarebytes 4.5.2
    Other Info
    Thermaltake Riing Duo 14 x3, Thermaltake Riing Plus 14 x2, Corsair HS70 Pro Wireless Headset
  • Operating System
    Windows 10 Pro
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop
    Manufacturer/Model
    Skylake Special Z170
    CPU
    Intel Core i7 6700K
    Motherboard
    Asus Sabertooth Z170 Mark 1
    Memory
    GSkill Trident Z RGB 16GB 3600 16-16-16-36 (F4-3600C16D-16GTZR)
    Graphics card(s)
    EVGA GTX 980 Ti SC x2, EVGA Pro SLI Bridge
    Sound Card
    Realtek High Definition
    Monitor(s) Displays
    AOC G2460PG
    Screen Resolution
    1920 x 1080 144Hz
    Hard Drives
    Samsung 870 Evo 500GB, Seagate Barracuda 4TB x2
    PSU
    EVGA 1000 P2, EVGA White Custom Braided Cables
    Case
    Corsair Vengeance C70 Gunmetal Black
    Cooling
    Corsair H100i v2, Corsair ML120 x2, Thermal Grizzly Kryonaut
    Mouse
    Logitech G500s
    Keyboard
    Logitech G910 Orion Spectrum
    Internet Speed
    Verizon Fios Quantum Gateway 75/75
    Browser
    Edge
    Antivirus
    Windows Defender, Malwarebytes 4.5.2
    Other Info
    Corsair SP120 x4, LG Blu-ray Drive, Durabrand HT-395 100 Watt Dolby Digital Amp
As I said earlier, the roots of verification date back to days when writing media were less reliable. If you think about it, now we do terabytes of writing to modern hard drives, and data loss is rare.

Far be it for me to advise that verification is not needed, but I would like to challenge users here when was the last time verification failed on modern hard drives. Even when I did do i6r, I cannot recollect a single instance on modern hard drives. For sure I used to get failures on bsckimg up to dvd drive (so last but one decade).

To me verification is more of a physcological activity, these days, predicated on historical use/experience.

Naturally, there is always a SODs law that will kick in i.e. because you failed to verify it, naturally, this is the one time the backup will be knackered LOL.
 

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    Windows 10 Pro + others in VHDs
    Computer type
    Laptop
    Manufacturer/Model
    ASUS Vivobook 14
    CPU
    I7
    Motherboard
    Yep, Laptop has one.
    Memory
    16 GB
    Graphics Card(s)
    Integrated Intel Iris XE
    Sound Card
    Realtek built in
    Monitor(s) Displays
    N/A
    Screen Resolution
    1920x1080
    Hard Drives
    1 TB Optane NVME SSD, 1 TB NVME SSD
    PSU
    Yep, got one
    Case
    Yep, got one
    Cooling
    Stella Artois
    Keyboard
    Built in
    Mouse
    Bluetooth , wired
    Internet Speed
    72 Mb/s :-(
    Browser
    Edge mostly
    Antivirus
    Defender
    Other Info
    TPM 2.0
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