System Change Default Operating System to Run at Startup in Windows 11


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Default_OS_banner.png

This tutorial will show you how to change the default operating system to run at startup in Windows 10 and Windows 11.

If you have more than on operating system installed on your computer, you will see a boot options menu at startup to Choose an operating system.

The default boot entry is the entry that the boot loader selects when the boot menu time-out expires. You can change the default boot entry to ensure that the operating system you prefer is loaded automatically at startup.

The last operating system installed will be the default OS in the boot menu by default.

Reference:


Contents

  • Option One: Change Default Operating System to Run at Startup in Boot Options
  • Option Two: Change Default Operating System to Run at Startup in System Properties
  • Option Three: Change Default Operating System to Run at Startup in System Configuration (msconfig)
  • Option Four: Change Default Operating System to Run at Startup in Command Prompt


EXAMPLE: Default OS listed first in boot options menu

Boot_options_menu.png





Option One

Change Default Operating System to Run at Startup in Boot Options


1 While on the Choose an operating system at boot, click/tap on the Change defaults or choose other options link. (see screenshot below)

Change_default_OS_boot_options_menu-1.png

2 Click/tap on Choose a default operating system. (see screenshot below)

Change_default_OS_boot_options_menu-2.png

3 Click/tap on an available operating system (ex: "Windows 11") you want as the default. (see screenshot below)

Change_default_OS_boot_options_menu-3.png

4 Click/tap on the back arrow button. (see screenshot below)

Change_default_OS_boot_options_menu-4.png

5 Click/tap on the OS (ex: "Windows 11") you want to run now. (see screenshot below)

Change_default_OS_boot_options_menu-5.png




Option Two

Change Default Operating System to Run at Startup in System Properties


You must be signed in as an administrator to use this option.


1 Open System Properties (sysdm.cpl).

2 Click/tap on the Advanced tab, and click/tap on Settings for "Startup and Recovery". (see screenshot below)

Change_default_OS_System_Properties-1.png

3 Select the OS (ex: "Windows 11") you want in the Default operating system drop menu, and click/tap on OK. (see screenshot below)

Change_default_OS_System_Properties-2.png

4 Click/tap on OK. (see screenshot below)

Change_default_OS_System_Properties-3.png




Option Three

Change Default Operating System to Run at Startup in System Configuration (msconfig)


You must be signed in as an administrator to use this option.


1 Open System Configuration (msconfig.exe).

2 Perform the following actions: (see screenshot below)
  1. Click/tap on the Boot tab.
  2. Select the OS (ex: "Windows 11") you want as default.
  3. Click/tap on the Set as default button.
  4. Click/tap on OK.
Change_default_OS_msconfig-1.png

3 Click/tap on Exit without restart since a restart is not required to apply. (see screenshot below)

Change_default_OS_msconfig-2.png




Option Four

Change Default Operating System to Run at Startup in Command Prompt


1 Open an elevated command prompt or command prompt at boot.

You must be signed in as an administrator to open an elevated command prompt.


2 Copy and paste the bcdedit command into the command prompt, and press Enter. (see screenshot below step 3)

3 You can look under the top Windows Boot Loader section to see what the default entry shows as the identifier (ex: "{default}") for the current default OS. (see screenshot below)

Change_default_OS_command-1.png

4 Look under the Windows Boot Loader section for the Windows 11 "description" you want to be the default OS to see what its identifier (ex: "{current}") is. (see screenshot below step 5)

5 Type the command below into the command prompt, and press Enter. (see screenshot below)

bcdedit /default {identifier}

Substitute {identifier} in the command above with the actual identifier (ex: "{current}") from step 4.

For example: bcdedit /default {current}


Change_default_OS_command-2.png



That's it,
Shawn Brink


 

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"You must be signed in as an administrator to use this option." Gotcha, but how?
 

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    Windows 11
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop
    Manufacturer/Model
    Dell OptiPlex 3090
    CPU
    Core i3 10105
"You must be signed in as an administrator to use this option." Gotcha, but how?
Hello Hans, and welcome. :-)

Do you have an administrator account to sign in to, or are you unable to sign in?
 

My Computers

System One System Two

  • OS
    Windows 11 Pro for Workstations
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop
    Manufacturer/Model
    Custom self build
    CPU
    Intel i7-8700K 5 GHz
    Motherboard
    ASUS ROG Maximus XI Formula Z390
    Memory
    64 GB (4x16GB) G.SKILL TridentZ RGB DDR4 3600 MHz (F4-3600C18D-32GTZR)
    Graphics Card(s)
    ASUS ROG-STRIX-GTX1080TI-O11G-GAMING (11GB GDDR5X)
    Sound Card
    Integrated Digital Audio (S/PDIF)
    Monitor(s) Displays
    2 x Samsung Odyssey G75 27"
    Screen Resolution
    2560x1440
    Hard Drives
    1TB Samsung 990 PRO M.2,
    4TB Samsung 990 PRO M.2,
    8TB WD MyCloudEX2Ultra NAS
    PSU
    Seasonic Prime Titanium 850W
    Case
    Thermaltake Core P3 wall mounted
    Cooling
    Corsair Hydro H115i
    Keyboard
    Logitech wireless K800
    Mouse
    Logitech MX Master 3
    Internet Speed
    1 Gbps Download and 35 Mbps Upload
    Browser
    Google Chrome
    Antivirus
    Microsoft Defender and Malwarebytes Premium
    Other Info
    Logitech Z625 speaker system,
    Logitech BRIO 4K Pro webcam,
    HP Color LaserJet Pro MFP M477fdn,
    APC SMART-UPS RT 1000 XL - SURT1000XLI,
    Galaxy S23 Plus phone
  • Operating System
    Windows 11 Pro
    Computer type
    Laptop
    Manufacturer/Model
    HP Spectre x360 2in1 14-eu0098nr (2024)
    CPU
    Intel Core Ultra 7 155H 4.8 GHz
    Memory
    16 GB LPDDR5x-7467 MHz
    Graphics card(s)
    Integrated Intel Arc
    Sound Card
    Poly Studio
    Monitor(s) Displays
    14" 2.8K OLED multitouch
    Screen Resolution
    2880 x 1800
    Hard Drives
    2 TB PCIe NVMe M.2 SSD
    Internet Speed
    Intel Wi-Fi 7 BE200 (2x2) and Bluetooth 5.4
    Browser
    Chrome and Edge
    Antivirus
    Windows Defender and Malwarebytes Premium
Hi Brink,
After a Win11 update, I no longer see my dual boot ManjaroLinux/Win11 menu. I fixed this last year with the command: "bcdedit /set {bootmgr} path \EFI\Manjaro\grubx64.efi" , but the PC still boots only to Win11 directly.

Using the command: "bcdedit /set {bootmgr} displaybootmenu yes", and then rebooting, does show a boot menu, but the only choice showing in the 'Windows Boot Manager' is Windows 11 or the Memory Diagnostic tool.

I can boot into Manjaro with a USB, to detect and show boot methods, for me I choose ...Manjaro\grubx64.efi . In Manjaro I could conceivably use the 'efibootmgr' to change the 'BootOrder', but, for me, the efibootmgr manual, the partition choices, and many options given in the linux Terminal with the efibootmgr command are too cryptic, and I'm afraid to try.

Here's a pic from running 'bcdedit in Windows:
bcdedit.png

From your instructions, would I use the following command:
bcdedit /default {bootmgr}
 

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    Windows 11 Pro ver. 23H2 OS build 22631.3155
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop
    Manufacturer/Model
    CyberPower Inc.
    CPU
    Intel Core i5-11600KF
    Motherboard
    MSI MPG Z590 Gaming Carbon WIFI
    Memory
    48GB DDR4-2667 = 2x8 Patriot + 2x16 G.Skill
    Graphics Card(s)
    Nvidia GeForce RTX 3060
    Sound Card
    All on-board: Nvidia High-def Audio, Nvidia Virtual Audio Device, Realtek USB Audio
    Monitor(s) Displays
    LG 32GN63T-Baus
    Screen Resolution
    2560 x 1440
    Hard Drives
    GP-ASM2NE6100TTTD GIGABYTE AORUS NVMe Gen4 M.2 1TB PCI-E 4.0, CT250MX500SSD1, CT1000MX500SSD1
    PSU
    EVGA 600W Gold 80 Plus
    Case
    Phantek Eclipse P600S Silent ATX
    Cooling
    Phantek PH-TC12DX U-Type Dual
    Keyboard
    NOHI 01 MODEL:KB-161-306
    Mouse
    CyberPowerPC Elite M1-131
    Internet Speed
    DL 827.77Mbps, UL 23.93 Mbps, Ping 4ms
    Browser
    Brave v1.63.169 Chromium to 122.0.6261.111
    Antivirus
    Emsisoft Anti-Malware Home
Hi Brink,
After a Win11 update, I no longer see my dual boot ManjaroLinux/Win11 menu. I fixed this last year with the command: "bcdedit /set {bootmgr} path \EFI\Manjaro\grubx64.efi" , but the PC still boots only to Win11 directly.

Using the command: "bcdedit /set {bootmgr} displaybootmenu yes", and then rebooting, does show a boot menu, but the only choice showing in the 'Windows Boot Manager' is Windows 11 or the Memory Diagnostic tool.

I can boot into Manjaro with a USB, to detect and show boot methods, for me I choose ...Manjaro\grubx64.efi . In Manjaro I could conceivably use the 'efibootmgr' to change the 'BootOrder', but, for me, the efibootmgr manual, the partition choices, and many options given in the linux Terminal with the efibootmgr command are too cryptic, and I'm afraid to try.

Here's a pic from running 'bcdedit in Windows:

From your instructions, would I use the following command:
bcdedit /default {bootmgr}

Hello, and welcome. :alien:

You wouldn't want to use that command. Instead, you'll need to repair the grub boot menu.

I don't use grub, so I can't help with that. I'd recommend to post this in the Installation, Updates and Activation forum area to see if someone may know.
 

My Computers

System One System Two

  • OS
    Windows 11 Pro for Workstations
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop
    Manufacturer/Model
    Custom self build
    CPU
    Intel i7-8700K 5 GHz
    Motherboard
    ASUS ROG Maximus XI Formula Z390
    Memory
    64 GB (4x16GB) G.SKILL TridentZ RGB DDR4 3600 MHz (F4-3600C18D-32GTZR)
    Graphics Card(s)
    ASUS ROG-STRIX-GTX1080TI-O11G-GAMING (11GB GDDR5X)
    Sound Card
    Integrated Digital Audio (S/PDIF)
    Monitor(s) Displays
    2 x Samsung Odyssey G75 27"
    Screen Resolution
    2560x1440
    Hard Drives
    1TB Samsung 990 PRO M.2,
    4TB Samsung 990 PRO M.2,
    8TB WD MyCloudEX2Ultra NAS
    PSU
    Seasonic Prime Titanium 850W
    Case
    Thermaltake Core P3 wall mounted
    Cooling
    Corsair Hydro H115i
    Keyboard
    Logitech wireless K800
    Mouse
    Logitech MX Master 3
    Internet Speed
    1 Gbps Download and 35 Mbps Upload
    Browser
    Google Chrome
    Antivirus
    Microsoft Defender and Malwarebytes Premium
    Other Info
    Logitech Z625 speaker system,
    Logitech BRIO 4K Pro webcam,
    HP Color LaserJet Pro MFP M477fdn,
    APC SMART-UPS RT 1000 XL - SURT1000XLI,
    Galaxy S23 Plus phone
  • Operating System
    Windows 11 Pro
    Computer type
    Laptop
    Manufacturer/Model
    HP Spectre x360 2in1 14-eu0098nr (2024)
    CPU
    Intel Core Ultra 7 155H 4.8 GHz
    Memory
    16 GB LPDDR5x-7467 MHz
    Graphics card(s)
    Integrated Intel Arc
    Sound Card
    Poly Studio
    Monitor(s) Displays
    14" 2.8K OLED multitouch
    Screen Resolution
    2880 x 1800
    Hard Drives
    2 TB PCIe NVMe M.2 SSD
    Internet Speed
    Intel Wi-Fi 7 BE200 (2x2) and Bluetooth 5.4
    Browser
    Chrome and Edge
    Antivirus
    Windows Defender and Malwarebytes Premium

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