Dev Drives?


Steve C

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I've just discovered the security setting for Dev Drives in Windows Defender virus & threat protection settings in my Windows 11 PCs. I'm mystified why I have these, what they are for whether I should disable DevDrives. Opinions?
 

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    Windows 11 Pro
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop
    Manufacturer/Model
    Self build
    CPU
    Core i7-13700K
    Motherboard
    Asus TUF Gaming Plus WiFi Z790
    Memory
    64 GB Kingston Fury Beast DDR5
    Graphics Card(s)
    Gigabyte GeForce RTX 2060 Super Gaming OC 8G
    Sound Card
    Realtek S1200A
    Monitor(s) Displays
    Viewsonic VP2770
    Screen Resolution
    2560 x 1440
    Hard Drives
    Kingston KC3000 2TB NVME SSD & SATA HDDs & SSD
    PSU
    EVGA SuperNova G2 850W
    Case
    Nanoxia Deep Silence 1
    Cooling
    Noctua NH-D14
    Keyboard
    Microsoft Digital Media Pro
    Mouse
    Logitech Wireless
    Internet Speed
    50 Mb / s
    Browser
    Chrome
    Antivirus
    Defender
Dev Drives are a form of ReFS volumes designed for application developers to host their code repositories on them. Compiling software requires creating a lot of temp files, which are later discarded, and the default Defender real-time settings can negatively impact the compiler's performance. As a compromise, you migrate your dev activities to a Dev Drive, and Defender promises to be less aggressive in scanning the volume. This only happens because Defender knows why Dev Drives exist in the first place.

If you're not a dev, then Dev Drives don't need to be created.
 

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    Windows 7
Dev Drives are a form of ReFS volumes designed for application developers to host their code repositories on them. Compiling software requires creating a lot of temp files, which are later discarded, and the default Defender real-time settings can negatively impact the compiler's performance. As a compromise, you migrate your dev activities to a Dev Drive, and Defender promises to be less aggressive in scanning the volume. This only happens because Defender knows why Dev Drives exist in the first place.

If you're not a dev, then Dev Drives don't need to be created.
It seems I don't actually have any Dev drives and that Defender option is to configure them shoud I have any.

Screenshot 2024-04-05 223127.png
 

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    Windows 11 Pro
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop
    Manufacturer/Model
    Self build
    CPU
    Core i7-13700K
    Motherboard
    Asus TUF Gaming Plus WiFi Z790
    Memory
    64 GB Kingston Fury Beast DDR5
    Graphics Card(s)
    Gigabyte GeForce RTX 2060 Super Gaming OC 8G
    Sound Card
    Realtek S1200A
    Monitor(s) Displays
    Viewsonic VP2770
    Screen Resolution
    2560 x 1440
    Hard Drives
    Kingston KC3000 2TB NVME SSD & SATA HDDs & SSD
    PSU
    EVGA SuperNova G2 850W
    Case
    Nanoxia Deep Silence 1
    Cooling
    Noctua NH-D14
    Keyboard
    Microsoft Digital Media Pro
    Mouse
    Logitech Wireless
    Internet Speed
    50 Mb / s
    Browser
    Chrome
    Antivirus
    Defender
For those interested, here's a more complete explanation:

Performance mode compared to real-time protection​

By default, to give the best possible performance, creating a Dev Drive automatically grants trust in the new volume. A trusted Dev Drive volume causes real-time protection to run in a special asynchronous performance mode for that volume. Running performance mode provides a balance between threat protection and performance. The balance is achieved by deferring security scans until after the open file operation has completed, instead of performing the security scan synchronously while the file operation is being processed. This mode of performing security scans inherently provides faster performance, but with less protection. However, enabling performance mode provides significantly better protection than other performance tuning methods such as using folder exclusions, which block security scans altogether.
 

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    Windows 7

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    Windows 11 Pro
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop
    Manufacturer/Model
    Self build
    CPU
    Core i7-13700K
    Motherboard
    Asus TUF Gaming Plus WiFi Z790
    Memory
    64 GB Kingston Fury Beast DDR5
    Graphics Card(s)
    Gigabyte GeForce RTX 2060 Super Gaming OC 8G
    Sound Card
    Realtek S1200A
    Monitor(s) Displays
    Viewsonic VP2770
    Screen Resolution
    2560 x 1440
    Hard Drives
    Kingston KC3000 2TB NVME SSD & SATA HDDs & SSD
    PSU
    EVGA SuperNova G2 850W
    Case
    Nanoxia Deep Silence 1
    Cooling
    Noctua NH-D14
    Keyboard
    Microsoft Digital Media Pro
    Mouse
    Logitech Wireless
    Internet Speed
    50 Mb / s
    Browser
    Chrome
    Antivirus
    Defender

My Computers

System One System Two

  • OS
    Windows 11 Pro 23H2 [rev. 3737]
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop
    Manufacturer/Model
    Intel NUC12WSHi7
    CPU
    12th Gen Intel Core i7-1260P, 2100 MHz
    Motherboard
    NUC12WSBi7
    Memory
    64 GB
    Graphics Card(s)
    Intel Iris Xe
    Sound Card
    built-in Realtek HD audio
    Monitor(s) Displays
    Dell U3219Q
    Screen Resolution
    3840x2160 @ 60Hz
    Hard Drives
    Samsung SSD 990 PRO 1TB
    Keyboard
    CODE 104-Key Mechanical Keyboard with Cherry MX Clears
  • Operating System
    Linux Mint 21.2 (Cinnamon)
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop
    Manufacturer/Model
    Intel NUC8i5BEH
    CPU
    Intel Core i5-8259U CPU @ 2.30GHz
    Memory
    32 GB
    Graphics card(s)
    Iris Plus 655
    Keyboard
    CODE 104-Key Mechanical Keyboard - Cherry MX Clear
Pardon for my noobish question:

Could this feature somehow be used to improve gaming performance? Like putting all the games on a dev drive?
 

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    Windows 11

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