Solved Hyper-V error


Winuser

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I tried running my Win 10 Hyper-V VM this morning and this error popped up. I haven't used Hyper-V in a while, so I don't know when the problem started. Anyone have any suggestions on how to fix this?

Hyper-V Error.jpg
 

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cereberus

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That usually means settings reference a vhd or iso that has been moved or deleted.
 

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    Yep, Laptop has one.
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    1 TB Optane NVME SSD, 1 TB NVME SSD
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Slavic

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Yes, you can re-configure the VM in settings and point at new ISO location. If you used ISO only to install Windows on virtual disk and it is no longer required after installation, you can remove this file from configuration, even with its controller.
 

My Computer

System One

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    Windows 11 Pro; Windows 8.1 Pro
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    CPU
    i7-12700K (Alder Lake)
    Motherboard
    Asus PRIME Z690-M Plus D4
    Memory
    16 GB (2x8 Corsair DDR4-2132)
    Graphics Card(s)
    Asus GeForce 1050 Ti, 4 GB
    Monitor(s) Displays
    Philips 235PQ
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    1920x1080
    Hard Drives
    Windows 11: Samsung SSD 870 EVO, 500 GB (SATA), MBR
    Windows 8.1: Samsung SSD 980 PRO, 500 GB (M.2), MBR
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    Platimax D.F. 1050 W (80 Plus Platinum)
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Winuser

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That usually means settings reference a vhd or iso that has been moved or deleted.
That was my first thought. The file is right where it should be. I can't even import the saved VM. I'm thinking a setting got turned off.

Hyper-V Inport.jpg
Hyper-V Export.jpg
 

My Computers

System One System Two

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    Windows 11
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop
    Manufacturer/Model
    PowerSpec B746
    CPU
    Intel Core i7-10700K
    Motherboard
    ASRock Z490 Phantom Gaming 4/ax
    Memory
    16GB (8GB PC4-19200 DDR4 SDRAM x2)
    Graphics Card(s)
    NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1050 TI
    Sound Card
    Realtek Audio
    Monitor(s) Displays
    Samsung SAM0A87 Samsung SAM0D32
    Screen Resolution
    1920 x 1080
    Hard Drives
    NVMe WDC WDS100T2B0C-00PXH0 1TB
    Samsung SSD 860 EVO 1TB
    PSU
    750 Watts (62.5A)
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    PowerSpec/Lian Li ATX 205
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    Logitech K270
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    Microsoft Edge and Firefox
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    Windows 11 Dev
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    HP Envy x360 15-ds1083cl
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    AMD Ryzen 7 4700U 2.0GHZ
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    16 MB DDR 4-2666
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cereberus

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What have you set aa your default locations for the virtal machines amd the virtual jad drives?


The. export, if importing, you have to point to the virtual machines folder. You seem to be showing the virtual hard drive folder. I do not see how this is connected to previous issue of not finding iso.
 

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    Windows 10 Pro + others in VHDs
    Computer type
    Laptop
    Manufacturer/Model
    ASUS Vivobook 14
    CPU
    I7
    Motherboard
    Yep, Laptop has one.
    Memory
    16 GB
    Graphics Card(s)
    Integrated Intel Iris XE
    Sound Card
    Realtek built in
    Monitor(s) Displays
    N/A
    Screen Resolution
    1920x1080
    Hard Drives
    1 TB Optane NVME SSD, 1 TB NVME SSD
    PSU
    Yep, got one
    Case
    Yep, got one
    Cooling
    Stella Artois
    Keyboard
    Built in
    Mouse
    Bluetooth , wired
    Internet Speed
    72 Mb/s :-(
    Browser
    Edge mostly
    Antivirus
    Defender
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Slavic

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If the VHD file isn't damaged and access isn't blocked by lack of permissions, the virtual machine can be recreated anew. It's quite easy process. But if VHD is damaged, situation is worse, you need to re-download it at best or create a new VHD and re-install a system at worst.
 

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  • OS
    Windows 11 Pro; Windows 8.1 Pro
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop
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    i7-12700K (Alder Lake)
    Motherboard
    Asus PRIME Z690-M Plus D4
    Memory
    16 GB (2x8 Corsair DDR4-2132)
    Graphics Card(s)
    Asus GeForce 1050 Ti, 4 GB
    Monitor(s) Displays
    Philips 235PQ
    Screen Resolution
    1920x1080
    Hard Drives
    Windows 11: Samsung SSD 870 EVO, 500 GB (SATA), MBR
    Windows 8.1: Samsung SSD 980 PRO, 500 GB (M.2), MBR
    PSU
    Platimax D.F. 1050 W (80 Plus Platinum)
    Internet Speed
    Local link 1 Gbps, provider's line 500 Mbps
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    Google Chrome
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    Realtek PCIe GbE Family Controller (for Windows 8.1 compatibility)
    Microsoft Office H&S 2013 x64

Winuser

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What have you set aa your default locations for the virtal machines amd the virtual jad drives?


The. export, if importing, you have to point to the virtual machines folder. You seem to be showing the virtual hard drive folder. I do not see how this is connected to previous issue of not finding iso.
I have pointed it to every folder and sub folder where I exported the VM with the same results. Were should I point Hyper-V to open the VM?
 

My Computers

System One System Two

  • OS
    Windows 11
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop
    Manufacturer/Model
    PowerSpec B746
    CPU
    Intel Core i7-10700K
    Motherboard
    ASRock Z490 Phantom Gaming 4/ax
    Memory
    16GB (8GB PC4-19200 DDR4 SDRAM x2)
    Graphics Card(s)
    NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1050 TI
    Sound Card
    Realtek Audio
    Monitor(s) Displays
    Samsung SAM0A87 Samsung SAM0D32
    Screen Resolution
    1920 x 1080
    Hard Drives
    NVMe WDC WDS100T2B0C-00PXH0 1TB
    Samsung SSD 860 EVO 1TB
    PSU
    750 Watts (62.5A)
    Case
    PowerSpec/Lian Li ATX 205
    Keyboard
    Logitech K270
    Mouse
    Logitech M185
    Browser
    Microsoft Edge and Firefox
    Antivirus
    ESET Internet Security
  • Operating System
    Windows 11 Dev
    Computer type
    Laptop
    Manufacturer/Model
    HP Envy x360 15-ds1083cl
    CPU
    AMD Ryzen 7 4700U 2.0GHZ
    Memory
    16 MB DDR 4-2666
    Graphics card(s)
    AMD Radeon
    Monitor(s) Displays
    15.6"
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    1920x1080
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    PCIe NVMe M.2 512GB
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Winuser

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If the VHD file isn't damaged and access isn't blocked by lack of permissions, the virtual machine can be recreated anew. It's quite easy process. But if VHD is damaged, situation is worse, you need to re-download it at best or create a new VHD and re-install a system at worst.
I'm a little Leery about changing or recreating anything. I don't want to go through the hassle of calling MS to get the VM activated again. The first time was bad enough.
 

My Computers

System One System Two

  • OS
    Windows 11
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop
    Manufacturer/Model
    PowerSpec B746
    CPU
    Intel Core i7-10700K
    Motherboard
    ASRock Z490 Phantom Gaming 4/ax
    Memory
    16GB (8GB PC4-19200 DDR4 SDRAM x2)
    Graphics Card(s)
    NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1050 TI
    Sound Card
    Realtek Audio
    Monitor(s) Displays
    Samsung SAM0A87 Samsung SAM0D32
    Screen Resolution
    1920 x 1080
    Hard Drives
    NVMe WDC WDS100T2B0C-00PXH0 1TB
    Samsung SSD 860 EVO 1TB
    PSU
    750 Watts (62.5A)
    Case
    PowerSpec/Lian Li ATX 205
    Keyboard
    Logitech K270
    Mouse
    Logitech M185
    Browser
    Microsoft Edge and Firefox
    Antivirus
    ESET Internet Security
  • Operating System
    Windows 11 Dev
    Computer type
    Laptop
    Manufacturer/Model
    HP Envy x360 15-ds1083cl
    CPU
    AMD Ryzen 7 4700U 2.0GHZ
    Memory
    16 MB DDR 4-2666
    Graphics card(s)
    AMD Radeon
    Monitor(s) Displays
    15.6"
    Screen Resolution
    1920x1080
    Hard Drives
    PCIe NVMe M.2 512GB
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    Firefox, Edge and Edge Canary
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Slavic

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I'm a little Leery about changing or recreating anything. I don't want to go through the hassle of calling MS to get the VM activated again. The first time was bad enough.
I understand this problem. On my side, I used only non-activated VMs (with evaluation keys) because it was enough for tests, and even after evaluation time with all /rearm ended, VM could be created again as eval version. Of course, all applications had to be reinstalled. But I haven't used VM as a permanent environment and never had the "heavy" or activated products inside. Some people may have, though.

In your case the activation state should be saved in VHD in Registry and if you restore the parameters of previous VM, hardware configuration will be the same, so activation shouldn't be lost. Well, you may make a backup copy of VHD if something goes wrong.
 

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    Windows 11 Pro; Windows 8.1 Pro
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop
    CPU
    i7-12700K (Alder Lake)
    Motherboard
    Asus PRIME Z690-M Plus D4
    Memory
    16 GB (2x8 Corsair DDR4-2132)
    Graphics Card(s)
    Asus GeForce 1050 Ti, 4 GB
    Monitor(s) Displays
    Philips 235PQ
    Screen Resolution
    1920x1080
    Hard Drives
    Windows 11: Samsung SSD 870 EVO, 500 GB (SATA), MBR
    Windows 8.1: Samsung SSD 980 PRO, 500 GB (M.2), MBR
    PSU
    Platimax D.F. 1050 W (80 Plus Platinum)
    Internet Speed
    Local link 1 Gbps, provider's line 500 Mbps
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Winuser

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I understand this problem. On my side, I used only non-activated VMs (with evaluation keys) because it was enough for tests, and even after evaluation time with all /rearm ended, VM could be created again as eval version. Of course, all applications had to be reinstalled. But I haven't used VM as a permanent environment and never had the "heavy" or activated products inside. Some people may have, though.

In your case the activation state should be saved in VHD in Registry and if you restore the parameters of previous VM, hardware configuration will be the same, so activation shouldn't be lost. Well, you may make a backup copy of VHD if something goes wrong.
I think the problem is with Hyper-V. I'm thinking a file got corrupted or a setting got changed. As a test I tried to make a new VM and it didn't work. I think my next step is trying a repair install. If that doesn't work, I can use my restore images to hopefully find out when it stopped working.
 

My Computers

System One System Two

  • OS
    Windows 11
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop
    Manufacturer/Model
    PowerSpec B746
    CPU
    Intel Core i7-10700K
    Motherboard
    ASRock Z490 Phantom Gaming 4/ax
    Memory
    16GB (8GB PC4-19200 DDR4 SDRAM x2)
    Graphics Card(s)
    NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1050 TI
    Sound Card
    Realtek Audio
    Monitor(s) Displays
    Samsung SAM0A87 Samsung SAM0D32
    Screen Resolution
    1920 x 1080
    Hard Drives
    NVMe WDC WDS100T2B0C-00PXH0 1TB
    Samsung SSD 860 EVO 1TB
    PSU
    750 Watts (62.5A)
    Case
    PowerSpec/Lian Li ATX 205
    Keyboard
    Logitech K270
    Mouse
    Logitech M185
    Browser
    Microsoft Edge and Firefox
    Antivirus
    ESET Internet Security
  • Operating System
    Windows 11 Dev
    Computer type
    Laptop
    Manufacturer/Model
    HP Envy x360 15-ds1083cl
    CPU
    AMD Ryzen 7 4700U 2.0GHZ
    Memory
    16 MB DDR 4-2666
    Graphics card(s)
    AMD Radeon
    Monitor(s) Displays
    15.6"
    Screen Resolution
    1920x1080
    Hard Drives
    PCIe NVMe M.2 512GB
    Browser
    Firefox, Edge and Edge Canary
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Bree

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As a test I tried to make a new VM and it didn't work. I think my next step is trying a repair install.
There is a much simpler fix for a 'broken' Hyper-V. Simply got to Windows Features and turn off Hyper-V. Then go back and turn it on again. This reinstalls Hyper-V and keeps all your existing VMs and their settings. The only thing you may need to set up again are any Virtual switches you may have added yourself, but if all your VMs use the Default Switch then that wouldn't be an issue.
 
Last edited:

My Computers

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  • OS
    Windows 11 Home
    Computer type
    Laptop
    Manufacturer/Model
    Acer Aspire 3 A315-23
    CPU
    AMD Athlon Silver 3050U
    Memory
    8GB
    Graphics Card(s)
    Radeon Graphics
    Monitor(s) Displays
    laptop screen
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    1366x768 native resolution, up to 2560x1440 with Radeon Virtual Super Resolution
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    1TB HDD
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    fully 'Windows 11 ready' laptop. Windows 10 C: partition migrated from my old unsupported 'main machine' then upgraded to 11. A test migration ran Insider builds for 2 months. When 11 was released on 5th October it was re-imaged back to 10 and was offered the upgrade in Windows Update on 20th October.


    My SYSTEM THREE is a Dell Latitude 5410, i7-10610U, 32GB RAM, 512GB ssd, Windows 11 Pro.
  • Operating System
    Windows 11 Pro
    Computer type
    Laptop
    Manufacturer/Model
    Dell Lattitude E4310
    CPU
    i5 M 520
    Motherboard
    0T6M8G
    Memory
    4GB
    Screen Resolution
    1366x768
    Hard Drives
    500GB HDD
    Browser
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    Antivirus
    Defender
    Other Info
    unsupported machine: Legacy bios, MBR, TPM 1.2, upgraded from W10 to W11 using W10/W11 hybrid install media workaround.


    My SYSTEM THREE is a Dell Latitude 5410, i7-10610U, 32GB RAM, 512GB ssd, Windows 11 Pro.

cereberus

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I understand this problem. On my side, I used only non-activated VMs (with evaluation keys) because it was enough for tests, and even after evaluation time with all /rearm ended, VM could be created again as eval version. Of course, all applications had to be reinstalled. But I haven't used VM as a permanent environment and never had the "heavy" or activated products inside. Some people may have, though.

In your case the activation state should be saved in VHD in Registry and if you restore the parameters of previous VM, hardware configuration will be the same, so activation shouldn't be lost. Well, you may make a backup copy of VHD if something goes wrong.

This is not how it works. Any virtual machine has an vmid which is essentially the same as a physical pcs mobo id (call it virtual mobo id if you like).

This virtual mobo id is stored on MS activation servers in same way as any physical mobo id.

When you use vm export and later import it, you have option to keep original id or create new one (need a new key to activate).

The virtual mobo id is stored somehow with the virtual machine files, NOT within the registry of a vhd.

You can prove this by restoring the vm (with same id), clean install W10 on a blank vhd, and vm will activate automatically provided you install same edition, even without entering a key.

It is important (imo essential) to back up the vm configuration files somewhere else, in case you accidentally delete the vm from the hyper-v gui. Whether you back up the vhds is a matter of choice (provided you back up important data of course).
 

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    Windows 10 Pro + others in VHDs
    Computer type
    Laptop
    Manufacturer/Model
    ASUS Vivobook 14
    CPU
    I7
    Motherboard
    Yep, Laptop has one.
    Memory
    16 GB
    Graphics Card(s)
    Integrated Intel Iris XE
    Sound Card
    Realtek built in
    Monitor(s) Displays
    N/A
    Screen Resolution
    1920x1080
    Hard Drives
    1 TB Optane NVME SSD, 1 TB NVME SSD
    PSU
    Yep, got one
    Case
    Yep, got one
    Cooling
    Stella Artois
    Keyboard
    Built in
    Mouse
    Bluetooth , wired
    Internet Speed
    72 Mb/s :-(
    Browser
    Edge mostly
    Antivirus
    Defender
    Other Info
    TPM 2.0

Winuser

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This is not how it works. Any virtual machine has an vmid which is essentially the same as a physical pcs mobo id (call it virtual mobo id if you like).

This virtual mobo id is stored on MS activation servers in same way as any physical mobo id.

When you use vm export and later import it, you have option to keep original id or create new one (need a new key to activate).

The virtual mobo id is stored somehow with the virtual machine files, NOT within the registry of a vhd.

You can prove this by restoring the vm (with same id), clean install W10 on a blank vhd, and vm will activate automatically provided you install same edition, even without entering a key.

It is important (imo essential) to back up the vm configuration files somewhere else, in case you accidentally delete the vm from the hyper-v gui. Whether you back up the vhds is a matter of choice (provided you back up important data of course).
With all of my trial and errors I did I decided to use a system restore I made on the 14th. I'm back to the Synthetic SCSI Controller error. I don't think it's a problem with the VM. I think it's either a setting was changed or a problem with Hyper-V.
 

My Computers

System One System Two

  • OS
    Windows 11
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop
    Manufacturer/Model
    PowerSpec B746
    CPU
    Intel Core i7-10700K
    Motherboard
    ASRock Z490 Phantom Gaming 4/ax
    Memory
    16GB (8GB PC4-19200 DDR4 SDRAM x2)
    Graphics Card(s)
    NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1050 TI
    Sound Card
    Realtek Audio
    Monitor(s) Displays
    Samsung SAM0A87 Samsung SAM0D32
    Screen Resolution
    1920 x 1080
    Hard Drives
    NVMe WDC WDS100T2B0C-00PXH0 1TB
    Samsung SSD 860 EVO 1TB
    PSU
    750 Watts (62.5A)
    Case
    PowerSpec/Lian Li ATX 205
    Keyboard
    Logitech K270
    Mouse
    Logitech M185
    Browser
    Microsoft Edge and Firefox
    Antivirus
    ESET Internet Security
  • Operating System
    Windows 11 Dev
    Computer type
    Laptop
    Manufacturer/Model
    HP Envy x360 15-ds1083cl
    CPU
    AMD Ryzen 7 4700U 2.0GHZ
    Memory
    16 MB DDR 4-2666
    Graphics card(s)
    AMD Radeon
    Monitor(s) Displays
    15.6"
    Screen Resolution
    1920x1080
    Hard Drives
    PCIe NVMe M.2 512GB
    Browser
    Firefox, Edge and Edge Canary
    Antivirus
    ESET Internet Security

Slavic

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You can prove this by restoring the vm (with same id), clean install W10 on a blank vhd, and vm will activate automatically provided you install same edition, even without entering a key.
You mean that the activated VM gets a digital licence which is bound to "hardware" configuration the similar way like on real PC hardware. As a result, the key is no longer needed, and some small changes in config will not reset the activation. Yes, I thought that it is stored somewhere in internal VM configuration in Registry, but you said (I think it's a direct info from devs or a result of tests) that specifically in VM activation is stored outside of VHD, but is still available from inside (otherwise Windows will not be able to determine its activation state). While I never worked yet with activated VMs, it's an important info. Thanks!
 

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    Windows 11 Pro; Windows 8.1 Pro
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop
    CPU
    i7-12700K (Alder Lake)
    Motherboard
    Asus PRIME Z690-M Plus D4
    Memory
    16 GB (2x8 Corsair DDR4-2132)
    Graphics Card(s)
    Asus GeForce 1050 Ti, 4 GB
    Monitor(s) Displays
    Philips 235PQ
    Screen Resolution
    1920x1080
    Hard Drives
    Windows 11: Samsung SSD 870 EVO, 500 GB (SATA), MBR
    Windows 8.1: Samsung SSD 980 PRO, 500 GB (M.2), MBR
    PSU
    Platimax D.F. 1050 W (80 Plus Platinum)
    Internet Speed
    Local link 1 Gbps, provider's line 500 Mbps
    Browser
    Google Chrome
    Other Info
    Realtek PCIe GbE Family Controller (for Windows 8.1 compatibility)
    Microsoft Office H&S 2013 x64

cereberus

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With all of my trial and errors I did I decided to use a system restore I made on the 14th. I'm back to the Synthetic SCSI Controller error. I don't think it's a problem with the VM. I think it's either a setting was changed or a problem with Hyper-V.

Post these images from settings menus and folders. I suspect something in settings is pointing to wrong place.

Also show where the iso is.

1641318815101.png

1641318784002.png

1641318696278.png


1641318616971.png
 

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    Windows 10 Pro + others in VHDs
    Computer type
    Laptop
    Manufacturer/Model
    ASUS Vivobook 14
    CPU
    I7
    Motherboard
    Yep, Laptop has one.
    Memory
    16 GB
    Graphics Card(s)
    Integrated Intel Iris XE
    Sound Card
    Realtek built in
    Monitor(s) Displays
    N/A
    Screen Resolution
    1920x1080
    Hard Drives
    1 TB Optane NVME SSD, 1 TB NVME SSD
    PSU
    Yep, got one
    Case
    Yep, got one
    Cooling
    Stella Artois
    Keyboard
    Built in
    Mouse
    Bluetooth , wired
    Internet Speed
    72 Mb/s :-(
    Browser
    Edge mostly
    Antivirus
    Defender
    Other Info
    TPM 2.0

Winuser

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When I get back on my desktop, I'll try to get the info you asked for. If needed do you know how I can reinstall Windows 10 and keep my activation? Hyper-V is new to me, so it won't take much to get me lost. Seems like every time I try to learn about Hyper-V I mess up. I feel more comfortable using the free VMWare Player.
 

My Computers

System One System Two

  • OS
    Windows 11
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop
    Manufacturer/Model
    PowerSpec B746
    CPU
    Intel Core i7-10700K
    Motherboard
    ASRock Z490 Phantom Gaming 4/ax
    Memory
    16GB (8GB PC4-19200 DDR4 SDRAM x2)
    Graphics Card(s)
    NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1050 TI
    Sound Card
    Realtek Audio
    Monitor(s) Displays
    Samsung SAM0A87 Samsung SAM0D32
    Screen Resolution
    1920 x 1080
    Hard Drives
    NVMe WDC WDS100T2B0C-00PXH0 1TB
    Samsung SSD 860 EVO 1TB
    PSU
    750 Watts (62.5A)
    Case
    PowerSpec/Lian Li ATX 205
    Keyboard
    Logitech K270
    Mouse
    Logitech M185
    Browser
    Microsoft Edge and Firefox
    Antivirus
    ESET Internet Security
  • Operating System
    Windows 11 Dev
    Computer type
    Laptop
    Manufacturer/Model
    HP Envy x360 15-ds1083cl
    CPU
    AMD Ryzen 7 4700U 2.0GHZ
    Memory
    16 MB DDR 4-2666
    Graphics card(s)
    AMD Radeon
    Monitor(s) Displays
    15.6"
    Screen Resolution
    1920x1080
    Hard Drives
    PCIe NVMe M.2 512GB
    Browser
    Firefox, Edge and Edge Canary
    Antivirus
    ESET Internet Security

cereberus

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Windows 10 Pro + others in VHDs
There is no "Virtual Machines" directory in the screen shot you posted.
Yeah - not sure why op is trying to import a vm. I am presuming there is a folder ....\windows 10 pro\virtual machines
 

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    Windows 10 Pro + others in VHDs
    Computer type
    Laptop
    Manufacturer/Model
    ASUS Vivobook 14
    CPU
    I7
    Motherboard
    Yep, Laptop has one.
    Memory
    16 GB
    Graphics Card(s)
    Integrated Intel Iris XE
    Sound Card
    Realtek built in
    Monitor(s) Displays
    N/A
    Screen Resolution
    1920x1080
    Hard Drives
    1 TB Optane NVME SSD, 1 TB NVME SSD
    PSU
    Yep, got one
    Case
    Yep, got one
    Cooling
    Stella Artois
    Keyboard
    Built in
    Mouse
    Bluetooth , wired
    Internet Speed
    72 Mb/s :-(
    Browser
    Edge mostly
    Antivirus
    Defender
    Other Info
    TPM 2.0

Winuser

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I want to thank everyone for trying to help me. I managed to import the Windows 10 VM. I decided that I wasn't going to worry about losing the activation and deled the VM. After that I was able to import the VM. I'm still getting the Virtual SCSI Controller fails to start error.
 

My Computers

System One System Two

  • OS
    Windows 11
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop
    Manufacturer/Model
    PowerSpec B746
    CPU
    Intel Core i7-10700K
    Motherboard
    ASRock Z490 Phantom Gaming 4/ax
    Memory
    16GB (8GB PC4-19200 DDR4 SDRAM x2)
    Graphics Card(s)
    NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1050 TI
    Sound Card
    Realtek Audio
    Monitor(s) Displays
    Samsung SAM0A87 Samsung SAM0D32
    Screen Resolution
    1920 x 1080
    Hard Drives
    NVMe WDC WDS100T2B0C-00PXH0 1TB
    Samsung SSD 860 EVO 1TB
    PSU
    750 Watts (62.5A)
    Case
    PowerSpec/Lian Li ATX 205
    Keyboard
    Logitech K270
    Mouse
    Logitech M185
    Browser
    Microsoft Edge and Firefox
    Antivirus
    ESET Internet Security
  • Operating System
    Windows 11 Dev
    Computer type
    Laptop
    Manufacturer/Model
    HP Envy x360 15-ds1083cl
    CPU
    AMD Ryzen 7 4700U 2.0GHZ
    Memory
    16 MB DDR 4-2666
    Graphics card(s)
    AMD Radeon
    Monitor(s) Displays
    15.6"
    Screen Resolution
    1920x1080
    Hard Drives
    PCIe NVMe M.2 512GB
    Browser
    Firefox, Edge and Edge Canary
    Antivirus
    ESET Internet Security

Winuser

Well-known member
Pro User
VIP
Thread Starter
Local time
6:36 AM
Posts
2,941
OS
Windows 11

My Computers

System One System Two

  • OS
    Windows 11
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop
    Manufacturer/Model
    PowerSpec B746
    CPU
    Intel Core i7-10700K
    Motherboard
    ASRock Z490 Phantom Gaming 4/ax
    Memory
    16GB (8GB PC4-19200 DDR4 SDRAM x2)
    Graphics Card(s)
    NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1050 TI
    Sound Card
    Realtek Audio
    Monitor(s) Displays
    Samsung SAM0A87 Samsung SAM0D32
    Screen Resolution
    1920 x 1080
    Hard Drives
    NVMe WDC WDS100T2B0C-00PXH0 1TB
    Samsung SSD 860 EVO 1TB
    PSU
    750 Watts (62.5A)
    Case
    PowerSpec/Lian Li ATX 205
    Keyboard
    Logitech K270
    Mouse
    Logitech M185
    Browser
    Microsoft Edge and Firefox
    Antivirus
    ESET Internet Security
  • Operating System
    Windows 11 Dev
    Computer type
    Laptop
    Manufacturer/Model
    HP Envy x360 15-ds1083cl
    CPU
    AMD Ryzen 7 4700U 2.0GHZ
    Memory
    16 MB DDR 4-2666
    Graphics card(s)
    AMD Radeon
    Monitor(s) Displays
    15.6"
    Screen Resolution
    1920x1080
    Hard Drives
    PCIe NVMe M.2 512GB
    Browser
    Firefox, Edge and Edge Canary
    Antivirus
    ESET Internet Security
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