Power button issue, laptop won’t power up


FrankW

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Lately unable to power up (with or without my adapter, no external devices connected), no response when pressing my power button while the battery is fully charged, only after disconnecting the battery (with the pinhole reset switch) the power button will respond till I shut down, then it fails again. I suspect I am having the following issues (bad Power Button contact is ruled out as the button responds normally when going in sleep mode and waking up using my power button):

  • Fast Startup, I am using the Windows recommended Fast Startup setting in Power Plan, there may be hibernation issues with my new (July 2022) Intel display driver (not the 2019 OEM driver recommended by Acer) that are carried over when shutting down: I got a hardware problem report in Reliability History (attached).
  • 2 months ago I replaced my battery with a non-Acer spare part but with the recommended (by Acer) model number and size, only the brand is different and capacity is 2 mWh larger than the original (50 instead of 48 mWh).
  • I was getting a very short BSOD event with a 4101 error (reset display driver) after last August Windows Core Isolation new (Hyper-V) security feature was installed and therefore had to update my Intel display driver package (downloaded and installed by Intel) that was a bit difficult to install (flipped back to the OEM 2019 display drivers) but finally got it to work OK, no more errors and much better sound volume.
I disabled Fast Startup for the time being and consider putting back my old Acer battery if I still get these power issues I also may roll back the display driver possibly having to disable the Core Isolation security option.

I would appreciate comments.

Thanks
 

Attachments

  • LiveKernelEvent error.txt
    639 bytes · Views: 2

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    Windows 11 Home 22H2 build: 22621.1194
    Computer type
    Laptop
    Manufacturer/Model
    Acer/Aspire5 515-54G-70AG
    CPU
    Intel i7-10510U CPU 1.8 GHZ
    Motherboard
    Intel Comet Lake-U PCH-LP Premium, firmware version 3.2
    Memory
    8 GB 1333.3 MHz Dual channel
    Graphics Card(s)
    Intel UHD + NVIDIA GeForce MX250
    Sound Card
    RealTek ALC255 chipset
    Monitor(s) Displays
    Full HD TN 16"
    Screen Resolution
    1920x1080 220 NITS
    Hard Drives
    SATA mechanical 1TB TOSHIBA HDWL110 X1UGPHELT 5600 rpm
    PSU
    Murata battery AP18C4k (31CP5/81/68) Li-Polymer Battery Pack, full capacity 46620 mWh 11.4V
    Case
    Polycarbonate with a metal panel lid
    Cooling
    1 fan
    Keyboard
    US
    Mouse
    Precision Trackpad
    Internet Speed
    15 mb/s
    Browser
    Edge
    Antivirus
    Windows Defender
    Other Info
    2022 Intel diplay driver: gfx_win_101.3413_101.2111.exe

hsehestedt

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I have no idea what computer model you have, but I once had a similar issue and the manufacturer had me perform a hardware reset. This may or may not work on your system, but worth a shot:

If you have a removable battery, disconnect it. Unplay AC power as well.

Press and hold the power button for one minute non-stop.

Plug-in the battery (if you disconnected it). Try powering back on again.
 

My Computers

System One System Two

  • OS
    Windows 11 Pro 22H2
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop
    Manufacturer/Model
    Home Built
    CPU
    Intel i7-11700K
    Motherboard
    ASUS Prime Z590-A
    Memory
    128GB Crucial Ballistix 3200MHz DRAM
    Graphics Card(s)
    No GPU - CPU graphics only (for now)
    Sound Card
    Realtek (on motherboard)
    Monitor(s) Displays
    HP Envy 32
    Screen Resolution
    2560 x 1440
    Hard Drives
    1 x 1TB NVMe Gen 4 x 4 SSD
    1 x 2TB NVMe Gen 3 x 4 SSD
    2 x 512GB 2.5" SSDs
    2 x 8TB HD
    PSU
    Corsair HX850i
    Case
    Corsair iCue 5000X RGB
    Cooling
    Noctua NH-D15 chromax.black cooler + 10 case fans
    Keyboard
    CODE backlit mechanical keyboard
    Mouse
    Logitech MX Master 3
    Internet Speed
    1Gb Up / 1 Gb Down
    Browser
    Chromium Edge
    Antivirus
    Windows Defender
    Other Info
    Additional options installed:
    WiFi 6E PCIe adapter
    ASUS ThunderboltEX 4 PCIe adapter
  • Operating System
    Dual Boot Windows 11 Pro 22H2 and Windows 10 Pro 22H2
    Computer type
    Laptop
    Manufacturer/Model
    HP Spectre x360 15-BL012DX
    CPU
    Intel i7-7500U
    Memory
    32GB
    Graphics card(s)
    Dual Intel HD 620 and Nvidia GeForce 940MX
    Sound Card
    Built-in Realtek HD Audio
    Monitor(s) Displays
    4k 15-inch
    Screen Resolution
    4k (3840 x 2160)
    Hard Drives
    1TB Seagate FireCuda 510 NVMe SSD
    Internet Speed
    1Gb Up / 1Gb Down
    Browser
    Chromium Edge
    Antivirus
    Windows Defender
    Other Info
    RAM Upgraded from 16GB to 32GB WiFi Upgraded from WiFi 5 to WiFi 6 SSD upgraded from 512GB NVMe SSD to 1TB Seagate FireCuda 510 NVMe SSD

FrankW

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Windows 11 Home 22H2 build: 22621.1194
I have no idea what computer model you have, but I once had a similar issue and the manufacturer had me perform a hardware reset. This may or may not work on your system, but worth a shot:

If you have a removable battery, disconnect it. Unplay AC power as well.

Press and hold the power button for one minute non-stop.

Plug-in the battery (if you disconnected it). Try powering back on again.
Yes I read about possible "residual-static" electricity builtup detected on MOBOs and I will open up the laptop to completely disconnect my battery and do that discharge routine you mention. BTW my system is under "My Compters" at the bottom of my post and the battery is internal (big job to disconnect, that's why Acer has this battery reset pinhole on their laptops)
My laptop is powering up OK again, I am on fully boot now (disabled Fast Startup and hibernation). Will try Fast Startup again after a week without power issues.
Thanks
Frank
 

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    Windows 11 Home 22H2 build: 22621.1194
    Computer type
    Laptop
    Manufacturer/Model
    Acer/Aspire5 515-54G-70AG
    CPU
    Intel i7-10510U CPU 1.8 GHZ
    Motherboard
    Intel Comet Lake-U PCH-LP Premium, firmware version 3.2
    Memory
    8 GB 1333.3 MHz Dual channel
    Graphics Card(s)
    Intel UHD + NVIDIA GeForce MX250
    Sound Card
    RealTek ALC255 chipset
    Monitor(s) Displays
    Full HD TN 16"
    Screen Resolution
    1920x1080 220 NITS
    Hard Drives
    SATA mechanical 1TB TOSHIBA HDWL110 X1UGPHELT 5600 rpm
    PSU
    Murata battery AP18C4k (31CP5/81/68) Li-Polymer Battery Pack, full capacity 46620 mWh 11.4V
    Case
    Polycarbonate with a metal panel lid
    Cooling
    1 fan
    Keyboard
    US
    Mouse
    Precision Trackpad
    Internet Speed
    15 mb/s
    Browser
    Edge
    Antivirus
    Windows Defender
    Other Info
    2022 Intel diplay driver: gfx_win_101.3413_101.2111.exe

hsehestedt

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Sorry Frank, The "My Computer" was not showing for me for some reason (user error on my part I'm sure). No need to completely unplug the battery if it is internal. That was only for meant for removable batteries. You can do that procedure with the battery connected for an internal battery.

BTW, Fast Startup would have nothing to do with it. If the computer started but then failed to boot properly, then it might have an impact, but there is no way for fast startup to affect the actual power on. Remember that a lot happens before the OS starts to load (POST), so the OS is not even involved in that early process.
 

My Computers

System One System Two

  • OS
    Windows 11 Pro 22H2
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop
    Manufacturer/Model
    Home Built
    CPU
    Intel i7-11700K
    Motherboard
    ASUS Prime Z590-A
    Memory
    128GB Crucial Ballistix 3200MHz DRAM
    Graphics Card(s)
    No GPU - CPU graphics only (for now)
    Sound Card
    Realtek (on motherboard)
    Monitor(s) Displays
    HP Envy 32
    Screen Resolution
    2560 x 1440
    Hard Drives
    1 x 1TB NVMe Gen 4 x 4 SSD
    1 x 2TB NVMe Gen 3 x 4 SSD
    2 x 512GB 2.5" SSDs
    2 x 8TB HD
    PSU
    Corsair HX850i
    Case
    Corsair iCue 5000X RGB
    Cooling
    Noctua NH-D15 chromax.black cooler + 10 case fans
    Keyboard
    CODE backlit mechanical keyboard
    Mouse
    Logitech MX Master 3
    Internet Speed
    1Gb Up / 1 Gb Down
    Browser
    Chromium Edge
    Antivirus
    Windows Defender
    Other Info
    Additional options installed:
    WiFi 6E PCIe adapter
    ASUS ThunderboltEX 4 PCIe adapter
  • Operating System
    Dual Boot Windows 11 Pro 22H2 and Windows 10 Pro 22H2
    Computer type
    Laptop
    Manufacturer/Model
    HP Spectre x360 15-BL012DX
    CPU
    Intel i7-7500U
    Memory
    32GB
    Graphics card(s)
    Dual Intel HD 620 and Nvidia GeForce 940MX
    Sound Card
    Built-in Realtek HD Audio
    Monitor(s) Displays
    4k 15-inch
    Screen Resolution
    4k (3840 x 2160)
    Hard Drives
    1TB Seagate FireCuda 510 NVMe SSD
    Internet Speed
    1Gb Up / 1Gb Down
    Browser
    Chromium Edge
    Antivirus
    Windows Defender
    Other Info
    RAM Upgraded from 16GB to 32GB WiFi Upgraded from WiFi 5 to WiFi 6 SSD upgraded from 512GB NVMe SSD to 1TB Seagate FireCuda 510 NVMe SSD

FrankW

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Windows 11 Home 22H2 build: 22621.1194
Sorry Frank, The "My Computer" was not showing for me for some reason (user error on my part I'm sure). No need to completely unplug the battery if it is internal. That was only for meant for removable batteries. You can do that procedure with the battery connected for an internal battery.

BTW, Fast Startup would have nothing to do with it. If the computer started but then failed to boot properly, then it might have an impact, but there is no way for fast startup to affect the actual power on. Remember that a lot happens before the OS starts to load (POST), so the OS is not even involved in that early process.
No worries.
I agree that Windows11 OS won't affect the pre-post/CMOS process or early Power Button function but not so sure about the Kernel state when a Shutdown is aborted/bad or when a crash occurs. The hybrid sleep/hibernating during a Fast Startup should also not do that and my (mechanical contacts) Power Button condition is good as I can put the system to sleep and wake up again with that button. So what is left?
The battery being too strong (not SMART compliant), corrupted MS ACPI Power Button System software, Acer software also has control of the Power Button (interferes?). I can uninstall the Acer Power program and put the original Acer battery back. Could the CMOS battery be too low I have DC multi meters to check the voltage?
Just had the power button problem again, had to use the pinhole reset trick so this indicates either bad CMOS or an electric "overload" detected on the MOBO (or a faulty Power Supply module)? I got no error messages no problem (Kernel) report, nothing!

Update 17:00 hrs
Someone wrote me that CMOS has no effect on the Power Button, only on time settings, even with a dead CMOS the laptop should power up. A strange thing happened when putting the system to sleep mode via the Power Button and waking up with same a got a Lock Screen asking to logon, I am on auto logon (no password) that migrated from W10 and I had no Lock Screen activated but I changed a graphics setting in W11 (got that 4101 display error again) and that triggered the Lock Screen with a password, I canceled the Lock Screen in the registry and set password to "Never" in My Account so all is OK now. But turning the power on is good now (keep my fingers crossed). Booted 10 times with the Power button without any pain (very fast responses). maybe the static electricity on the MOBO has been finally discharged.......

Update 28 September, 2022
Fixed it: QALSvc (Acer's environmental/BIOS controller running at the background) changed my Power settings after I changed Power Plan in Windows from "Balanced" to "Best Performance" and that did it, no more Power Button failures (I hope):unsure:
 

Attachments

  • Acer Power.txt
    1.4 KB · Views: 1
  • Acer Power app.jpg
    Acer Power app.jpg
    40.1 KB · Views: 2
Last edited:

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    Windows 11 Home 22H2 build: 22621.1194
    Computer type
    Laptop
    Manufacturer/Model
    Acer/Aspire5 515-54G-70AG
    CPU
    Intel i7-10510U CPU 1.8 GHZ
    Motherboard
    Intel Comet Lake-U PCH-LP Premium, firmware version 3.2
    Memory
    8 GB 1333.3 MHz Dual channel
    Graphics Card(s)
    Intel UHD + NVIDIA GeForce MX250
    Sound Card
    RealTek ALC255 chipset
    Monitor(s) Displays
    Full HD TN 16"
    Screen Resolution
    1920x1080 220 NITS
    Hard Drives
    SATA mechanical 1TB TOSHIBA HDWL110 X1UGPHELT 5600 rpm
    PSU
    Murata battery AP18C4k (31CP5/81/68) Li-Polymer Battery Pack, full capacity 46620 mWh 11.4V
    Case
    Polycarbonate with a metal panel lid
    Cooling
    1 fan
    Keyboard
    US
    Mouse
    Precision Trackpad
    Internet Speed
    15 mb/s
    Browser
    Edge
    Antivirus
    Windows Defender
    Other Info
    2022 Intel diplay driver: gfx_win_101.3413_101.2111.exe

FrankW

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Windows 11 Home 22H2 build: 22621.1194
@hsehestedt
Found out what caused my Power problem: Bad battery, I replaced my Acer batttery last month with a cheap one Manufacturer Name: LGC, Unique ID:7056LGCAP18C8K 50299 Mwh that delivers only 11.25 Volt that should be 11.4 Volt, probably some SMART items also not compatible. The vendor incorrectly claimed that AP18C4K and AP18C8K are identical.
I put back my old Acer battery: MURATA AP18C4K (31CP5/81/68) Li-Polymer Battery Pack 11.4V 13.05V 4200mAH, 48WH min. rated 3880mAH 44WH AP18C4K Acer part no.: KT00304012 AP18C4K(3ICP5/81/68) 93005226B101
Power Button functions perfectly. I ordered a new (original Acer battery).
Frank:-)
 

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    Windows 11 Home 22H2 build: 22621.1194
    Computer type
    Laptop
    Manufacturer/Model
    Acer/Aspire5 515-54G-70AG
    CPU
    Intel i7-10510U CPU 1.8 GHZ
    Motherboard
    Intel Comet Lake-U PCH-LP Premium, firmware version 3.2
    Memory
    8 GB 1333.3 MHz Dual channel
    Graphics Card(s)
    Intel UHD + NVIDIA GeForce MX250
    Sound Card
    RealTek ALC255 chipset
    Monitor(s) Displays
    Full HD TN 16"
    Screen Resolution
    1920x1080 220 NITS
    Hard Drives
    SATA mechanical 1TB TOSHIBA HDWL110 X1UGPHELT 5600 rpm
    PSU
    Murata battery AP18C4k (31CP5/81/68) Li-Polymer Battery Pack, full capacity 46620 mWh 11.4V
    Case
    Polycarbonate with a metal panel lid
    Cooling
    1 fan
    Keyboard
    US
    Mouse
    Precision Trackpad
    Internet Speed
    15 mb/s
    Browser
    Edge
    Antivirus
    Windows Defender
    Other Info
    2022 Intel diplay driver: gfx_win_101.3413_101.2111.exe

Winuser

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BTW, Fast Startup would have nothing to do with it
Wouldn't Fast Startup keep the laptop running in a low power state, so it doesn't actually access the pre-boot BIOS mode?
 

My Computers

System One System Two

  • OS
    Windows 11
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop
    Manufacturer/Model
    PowerSpec B746
    CPU
    Intel Core i7-10700K
    Motherboard
    ASRock Z490 Phantom Gaming 4/ax
    Memory
    16GB (8GB PC4-19200 DDR4 SDRAM x2)
    Graphics Card(s)
    NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1050 TI
    Sound Card
    Realtek Audio
    Monitor(s) Displays
    Samsung SAM0A87 Samsung SAM0D32
    Screen Resolution
    1920 x 1080
    Hard Drives
    NVMe WDC WDS100T2B0C-00PXH0 1TB
    Samsung SSD 860 EVO 1TB
    PSU
    750 Watts (62.5A)
    Case
    PowerSpec/Lian Li ATX 205
    Keyboard
    Logitech K270
    Mouse
    Logitech M185
    Browser
    Microsoft Edge and Firefox
    Antivirus
    ESET Internet Security
  • Operating System
    Windows 11 Dev
    Computer type
    Laptop
    Manufacturer/Model
    HP Envy x360 15-ds1083cl
    CPU
    AMD Ryzen 7 4700U 2.0GHZ
    Memory
    16 MB DDR 4-2666
    Graphics card(s)
    AMD Radeon
    Monitor(s) Displays
    15.6"
    Screen Resolution
    1920x1080
    Hard Drives
    PCIe NVMe M.2 512GB
    Browser
    Firefox, Edge and Edge Canary
    Antivirus
    ESET Internet Security

hsehestedt

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Wouldn't Fast Startup keep the laptop running in a low power state, so it doesn't actually access the pre-boot BIOS mode?
That's a good question. However, no, Fast Startup does not keep the computer in a low power state. The system is completely shutdown just as it is in a standard shutdown. So, the boot process starts in the same manner with a POST (Power On Self Test), but what happens after POST is different. Right at the top of this tutorial is a good illustration of this:

 

My Computers

System One System Two

  • OS
    Windows 11 Pro 22H2
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop
    Manufacturer/Model
    Home Built
    CPU
    Intel i7-11700K
    Motherboard
    ASUS Prime Z590-A
    Memory
    128GB Crucial Ballistix 3200MHz DRAM
    Graphics Card(s)
    No GPU - CPU graphics only (for now)
    Sound Card
    Realtek (on motherboard)
    Monitor(s) Displays
    HP Envy 32
    Screen Resolution
    2560 x 1440
    Hard Drives
    1 x 1TB NVMe Gen 4 x 4 SSD
    1 x 2TB NVMe Gen 3 x 4 SSD
    2 x 512GB 2.5" SSDs
    2 x 8TB HD
    PSU
    Corsair HX850i
    Case
    Corsair iCue 5000X RGB
    Cooling
    Noctua NH-D15 chromax.black cooler + 10 case fans
    Keyboard
    CODE backlit mechanical keyboard
    Mouse
    Logitech MX Master 3
    Internet Speed
    1Gb Up / 1 Gb Down
    Browser
    Chromium Edge
    Antivirus
    Windows Defender
    Other Info
    Additional options installed:
    WiFi 6E PCIe adapter
    ASUS ThunderboltEX 4 PCIe adapter
  • Operating System
    Dual Boot Windows 11 Pro 22H2 and Windows 10 Pro 22H2
    Computer type
    Laptop
    Manufacturer/Model
    HP Spectre x360 15-BL012DX
    CPU
    Intel i7-7500U
    Memory
    32GB
    Graphics card(s)
    Dual Intel HD 620 and Nvidia GeForce 940MX
    Sound Card
    Built-in Realtek HD Audio
    Monitor(s) Displays
    4k 15-inch
    Screen Resolution
    4k (3840 x 2160)
    Hard Drives
    1TB Seagate FireCuda 510 NVMe SSD
    Internet Speed
    1Gb Up / 1Gb Down
    Browser
    Chromium Edge
    Antivirus
    Windows Defender
    Other Info
    RAM Upgraded from 16GB to 32GB WiFi Upgraded from WiFi 5 to WiFi 6 SSD upgraded from 512GB NVMe SSD to 1TB Seagate FireCuda 510 NVMe SSD

FrankW

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Windows 11 Home 22H2 build: 22621.1194
Acer's (internal) document states that both batteries are compatible for my laptop although the LGC battery (bottom of list attached) I bought does not deliver sufficient power (11.25V instead of the 11.4V) and after 3 frustrating weeks (almost shipped my laptop to Acer for servicing) finally tried to power up without battery (a hassle with 11 difficult/faulty screws to open-up my laptop); I had no issues whatsoever (proved that my PSU and Power Button contacts are all OK). My old Murata (Original Acer) battery still holds 67% charge (1 cell died) and good for 3 hours constant on the internet with the Balanced Power Plan after 3 years daily, very intensive, use (good battery performance): The Murata battery powers up (always has) perfectly, now showing a constant 33% wear level (HWINFO).

To me this illustrates the validity of HW testing by some vendors: Acer has put dozens (maybe even hundreds) of different Aspire 5 models on the market and for sure did not test older Aspire5 models (long enough) with the latest (Chinese) type batteries, the Murata is also twice as expensive ($80), and very difficult to find in the Philippines, than the highly popular (generic?) LGC (<$40, with an unreliable SMART logic chip, HWINFO showed 0% wear, capacity higher than the rating, this after several months daily use on battery in the field on my farm).
 

Attachments

  • Wrong battery.png
    Wrong battery.png
    5.3 KB · Views: 2

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    Windows 11 Home 22H2 build: 22621.1194
    Computer type
    Laptop
    Manufacturer/Model
    Acer/Aspire5 515-54G-70AG
    CPU
    Intel i7-10510U CPU 1.8 GHZ
    Motherboard
    Intel Comet Lake-U PCH-LP Premium, firmware version 3.2
    Memory
    8 GB 1333.3 MHz Dual channel
    Graphics Card(s)
    Intel UHD + NVIDIA GeForce MX250
    Sound Card
    RealTek ALC255 chipset
    Monitor(s) Displays
    Full HD TN 16"
    Screen Resolution
    1920x1080 220 NITS
    Hard Drives
    SATA mechanical 1TB TOSHIBA HDWL110 X1UGPHELT 5600 rpm
    PSU
    Murata battery AP18C4k (31CP5/81/68) Li-Polymer Battery Pack, full capacity 46620 mWh 11.4V
    Case
    Polycarbonate with a metal panel lid
    Cooling
    1 fan
    Keyboard
    US
    Mouse
    Precision Trackpad
    Internet Speed
    15 mb/s
    Browser
    Edge
    Antivirus
    Windows Defender
    Other Info
    2022 Intel diplay driver: gfx_win_101.3413_101.2111.exe

hsehestedt

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11.25V vs 11.4V will make no difference whatsoever. Bear in mind that this voltage is a nominal rating. Li-Ion batteries have the characteristic of dropping in voltage once you start using the battery and slowly tapering down to a voltage at which the battery is considered to be empty, although in actuality the battery is far from being empty at that point, but that's a topic for another time.

The point is simply that Li-Ion batteries have a range of voltages that varies upon the level of charge. In your case, the battery voltage is derived from 3 cells in series. When fully charged, your battery probably has a voltage of about 12.6V which slowly drops down until the battery is considered empty, which would typically be around 10.2 volts. The 11.25V or 11.4V rating is merely what the manufacturer considers to be the nominal voltage of that battery at which the life of the battery is the greatest in long term storage.

Again, your computer is designed to work within a range of voltages since the battery voltage varies between the full point and the empty point.

Think of it like the gas tank in your car. You start with a full tank, but the car works just perfectly anywhere between full and empty. Likewise, the voltage of the battery varies between full and empty.

Side note (sorry if this boring): This characteristic of Li-Ion batteries is actually super useful in determining the level of charge. You can get an almost dead on estimate of the level of charge that a Li-Ion battery has by simply checking the voltage. This is not true of some other battery types such as NiCd or NiMh. They have the characteristic of having an almost stable voltage until they are just about dead at which time the voltage drops very rapidly. This makes getting an accurate read on the charge level much more difficult.
 

My Computers

System One System Two

  • OS
    Windows 11 Pro 22H2
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop
    Manufacturer/Model
    Home Built
    CPU
    Intel i7-11700K
    Motherboard
    ASUS Prime Z590-A
    Memory
    128GB Crucial Ballistix 3200MHz DRAM
    Graphics Card(s)
    No GPU - CPU graphics only (for now)
    Sound Card
    Realtek (on motherboard)
    Monitor(s) Displays
    HP Envy 32
    Screen Resolution
    2560 x 1440
    Hard Drives
    1 x 1TB NVMe Gen 4 x 4 SSD
    1 x 2TB NVMe Gen 3 x 4 SSD
    2 x 512GB 2.5" SSDs
    2 x 8TB HD
    PSU
    Corsair HX850i
    Case
    Corsair iCue 5000X RGB
    Cooling
    Noctua NH-D15 chromax.black cooler + 10 case fans
    Keyboard
    CODE backlit mechanical keyboard
    Mouse
    Logitech MX Master 3
    Internet Speed
    1Gb Up / 1 Gb Down
    Browser
    Chromium Edge
    Antivirus
    Windows Defender
    Other Info
    Additional options installed:
    WiFi 6E PCIe adapter
    ASUS ThunderboltEX 4 PCIe adapter
  • Operating System
    Dual Boot Windows 11 Pro 22H2 and Windows 10 Pro 22H2
    Computer type
    Laptop
    Manufacturer/Model
    HP Spectre x360 15-BL012DX
    CPU
    Intel i7-7500U
    Memory
    32GB
    Graphics card(s)
    Dual Intel HD 620 and Nvidia GeForce 940MX
    Sound Card
    Built-in Realtek HD Audio
    Monitor(s) Displays
    4k 15-inch
    Screen Resolution
    4k (3840 x 2160)
    Hard Drives
    1TB Seagate FireCuda 510 NVMe SSD
    Internet Speed
    1Gb Up / 1Gb Down
    Browser
    Chromium Edge
    Antivirus
    Windows Defender
    Other Info
    RAM Upgraded from 16GB to 32GB WiFi Upgraded from WiFi 5 to WiFi 6 SSD upgraded from 512GB NVMe SSD to 1TB Seagate FireCuda 510 NVMe SSD

FrankW

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tropicalhousegarden.com
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11.25V vs 11.4V will make no difference whatsoever. Bear in mind that this voltage is a nominal rating. Li-Ion batteries have the characteristic of dropping in voltage once you start using the battery and slowly tapering down to a voltage at which the battery is considered to be empty, although in actuality the battery is far from being empty at that point, but that's a topic for another time.

The point is simply that Li-Ion batteries have a range of voltages that varies upon the level of charge. In your case, the battery voltage is derived from 3 cells in series. When fully charged, your battery probably has a voltage of about 12.6V which slowly drops down until the battery is considered empty, which would typically be around 10.2 volts. The 11.25V or 11.4V rating is merely what the manufacturer considers to be the nominal voltage of that battery at which the life of the battery is the greatest in long term storage.

Again, your computer is designed to work within a range of voltages since the battery voltage varies between the full point and the empty point.

Think of it like the gas tank in your car. You start with a full tank, but the car works just perfectly anywhere between full and empty. Likewise, the voltage of the battery varies between full and empty.

Side note (sorry if this boring): This characteristic of Li-Ion batteries is actually super useful in determining the level of charge. You can get an almost dead on estimate of the level of charge that a Li-Ion battery has by simply checking the voltage. This is not true of some other battery types such as NiCd or NiMh. They have the characteristic of having an almost stable voltage until they are just about dead at which time the voltage drops very rapidly. This makes getting an accurate read on the charge level much more difficult.
This topic for me is not boring at all however, without using a digital multimeter to support this, I would question the "wide range" of voltages that laptop PSUs will work PROPERLY: The LGC in question did work for a few weeks, then my fan motor would start with a high pinched sound (over-charged) in pre-post for 1 minute and finally I was unable to power up at all. After resetting the battery with the "Pin Hole" button at the back of my laptop the same; would work for a few days then down again. This could well be a faulty SMART chip in that battery but IMO it is probably the voltage. Never had any of this happening with my Murata battery.

Some time ago I was expirimenting with a portable solar power supply with USB outlets on the farm and bought a generic 5 V DC power adapter with a adjustable output 9-15 v DC and different power pins (jacks) for laptops but I never got it to work properly with my old HP Mini (would sometimes work and charge for a while than the charge pilot light would turn off and I used an digital multimeter to check the "correct" voltage setting for that adapter. IMO the older laptop PSUs operate very critical with input voltage range, the latest laptops can be charged with with USB C port and those PSUs obviously support a wide range of input voltage.
 

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    Windows 11 Home 22H2 build: 22621.1194
    Computer type
    Laptop
    Manufacturer/Model
    Acer/Aspire5 515-54G-70AG
    CPU
    Intel i7-10510U CPU 1.8 GHZ
    Motherboard
    Intel Comet Lake-U PCH-LP Premium, firmware version 3.2
    Memory
    8 GB 1333.3 MHz Dual channel
    Graphics Card(s)
    Intel UHD + NVIDIA GeForce MX250
    Sound Card
    RealTek ALC255 chipset
    Monitor(s) Displays
    Full HD TN 16"
    Screen Resolution
    1920x1080 220 NITS
    Hard Drives
    SATA mechanical 1TB TOSHIBA HDWL110 X1UGPHELT 5600 rpm
    PSU
    Murata battery AP18C4k (31CP5/81/68) Li-Polymer Battery Pack, full capacity 46620 mWh 11.4V
    Case
    Polycarbonate with a metal panel lid
    Cooling
    1 fan
    Keyboard
    US
    Mouse
    Precision Trackpad
    Internet Speed
    15 mb/s
    Browser
    Edge
    Antivirus
    Windows Defender
    Other Info
    2022 Intel diplay driver: gfx_win_101.3413_101.2111.exe

hsehestedt

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This topic for me is not boring at all however, without using a digital multimeter to support this, I would question the "wide range" of voltages that laptop PSUs will work PROPERLY: The LGC in question did work for a few weeks, then my fan motor would start with a high pinched sound (over-charged) in pre-post for 1 minute and finally I was unable to power up at all. After resetting the battery with the "Pin Hole" button at the back of my laptop the same; would work for a few days then down again. This could well be a faulty SMART chip in that battery but IMO it is probably the voltage. Never had any of this happening with my Murata battery.

Some time ago I was expirimenting with a portable solar power supply with USB outlets on the farm and bought a generic 5 V DC power adapter with a adjustable output 9-15 v DC and different power pins (jacks) for laptops but I never got it to work properly with my old HP Mini (would sometimes work and charge for a while than the charge pilot light would turn off and I used an digital multimeter to check the "correct" voltage setting for that adapter. IMO the older laptop PSUs operate very critical with input voltage range, the latest laptops can be charged with with USB C port and those PSUs obviously support a wide range of input voltage.
Just to be clear, I was NOT talking about the voltage of the PSU. I was talking about the voltage of the battery. The fact that the voltage varies is not up for discussion. I can tell you for a fact that my description of how that works is accurate and that fact cannot be altered.
 

My Computers

System One System Two

  • OS
    Windows 11 Pro 22H2
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop
    Manufacturer/Model
    Home Built
    CPU
    Intel i7-11700K
    Motherboard
    ASUS Prime Z590-A
    Memory
    128GB Crucial Ballistix 3200MHz DRAM
    Graphics Card(s)
    No GPU - CPU graphics only (for now)
    Sound Card
    Realtek (on motherboard)
    Monitor(s) Displays
    HP Envy 32
    Screen Resolution
    2560 x 1440
    Hard Drives
    1 x 1TB NVMe Gen 4 x 4 SSD
    1 x 2TB NVMe Gen 3 x 4 SSD
    2 x 512GB 2.5" SSDs
    2 x 8TB HD
    PSU
    Corsair HX850i
    Case
    Corsair iCue 5000X RGB
    Cooling
    Noctua NH-D15 chromax.black cooler + 10 case fans
    Keyboard
    CODE backlit mechanical keyboard
    Mouse
    Logitech MX Master 3
    Internet Speed
    1Gb Up / 1 Gb Down
    Browser
    Chromium Edge
    Antivirus
    Windows Defender
    Other Info
    Additional options installed:
    WiFi 6E PCIe adapter
    ASUS ThunderboltEX 4 PCIe adapter
  • Operating System
    Dual Boot Windows 11 Pro 22H2 and Windows 10 Pro 22H2
    Computer type
    Laptop
    Manufacturer/Model
    HP Spectre x360 15-BL012DX
    CPU
    Intel i7-7500U
    Memory
    32GB
    Graphics card(s)
    Dual Intel HD 620 and Nvidia GeForce 940MX
    Sound Card
    Built-in Realtek HD Audio
    Monitor(s) Displays
    4k 15-inch
    Screen Resolution
    4k (3840 x 2160)
    Hard Drives
    1TB Seagate FireCuda 510 NVMe SSD
    Internet Speed
    1Gb Up / 1Gb Down
    Browser
    Chromium Edge
    Antivirus
    Windows Defender
    Other Info
    RAM Upgraded from 16GB to 32GB WiFi Upgraded from WiFi 5 to WiFi 6 SSD upgraded from 512GB NVMe SSD to 1TB Seagate FireCuda 510 NVMe SSD

FrankW

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tropicalhousegarden.com
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Thanks for clearing that up. Whether it is the Voltage, (m) Amps or Smart firmware (version) of the battery I don't know, for sure the LGC battery was at fault maybe also the tolerance of my PSU chips are down grading a bit with time: Acer is looking into the LGC battery issue (attached) and I may learn more. For the time being I will refrain from replacing any laptop hardware like SATA mechanical HDD, DDR4 modules or batteries that are not original brands/specs that came with my laptop, no more experimenting for me.
 

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My Computer

System One

  • OS
    Windows 11 Home 22H2 build: 22621.1194
    Computer type
    Laptop
    Manufacturer/Model
    Acer/Aspire5 515-54G-70AG
    CPU
    Intel i7-10510U CPU 1.8 GHZ
    Motherboard
    Intel Comet Lake-U PCH-LP Premium, firmware version 3.2
    Memory
    8 GB 1333.3 MHz Dual channel
    Graphics Card(s)
    Intel UHD + NVIDIA GeForce MX250
    Sound Card
    RealTek ALC255 chipset
    Monitor(s) Displays
    Full HD TN 16"
    Screen Resolution
    1920x1080 220 NITS
    Hard Drives
    SATA mechanical 1TB TOSHIBA HDWL110 X1UGPHELT 5600 rpm
    PSU
    Murata battery AP18C4k (31CP5/81/68) Li-Polymer Battery Pack, full capacity 46620 mWh 11.4V
    Case
    Polycarbonate with a metal panel lid
    Cooling
    1 fan
    Keyboard
    US
    Mouse
    Precision Trackpad
    Internet Speed
    15 mb/s
    Browser
    Edge
    Antivirus
    Windows Defender
    Other Info
    2022 Intel diplay driver: gfx_win_101.3413_101.2111.exe

britgeezer

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Had a problem with my wife's Dell 2 in1 after an update. Support was their normal helpful self.
No battery to remove.
Online I found out to - hold the Power button for 30-40 secs and release.
It worked, trust me more no more or less.
 

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    Windows 11
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop
    Manufacturer/Model
    Self Build
    CPU
    Ryzen 5800
    Motherboard
    Asus 550
    Memory
    32GB
    Graphics Card(s)
    Nividia 2600
    Sound Card
    On board
    Monitor(s) Displays
    LG
    Hard Drives
    NME
    Cooling
    Air
    Internet Speed
    1GB
    Other Info
    I also have a PC based server with multiple TB of storage acting as a media server and a couple of laptops. All use W11. data backup is via Drive Pool.

idgat

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Pure nostalgia here.

Had several Acer laptops over the many years and this used to be a favourite (Planned obsolescence - I suspect the original supplied batteries had a shorter life than subsequent replacement batteries (just like ink cartridges in new printers)).

Standard procedure when power on failed ... remove the power and battery, count up to 20, power in (no battery), power on, run a few program tests, power off, replace battery power on. If it didn't start, confirms the battery was stuffed, remove battery and run with just power until replacement battery.

I have no electronic skills to verify, but I read somewhere that some laptops draw their first source of power from the battery, whether power connected or not. If the battery is dead, it ain't gonna start. If there's no battery, then it "diverts" to the connected power and will power up. True/false .. or urban myth?
 

My Computers

System One System Two

  • OS
    Windows 11 22H2 (altest upadte ... anally always)
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop
    Manufacturer/Model
    HP Slim S01
    CPU
    Intel i5-9400
    Memory
    8GB
    Graphics Card(s)
    NVIDIA GeForce GT730
    Sound Card
    OOBE
    Monitor(s) Displays
    Acer 32"
    Screen Resolution
    1920x1080
    Hard Drives
    2 x 1TB SSDs
    PSU
    OOBE
    Case
    OOBE
    Cooling
    OOBE
    Keyboard
    Logitech wireless
    Mouse
    Logitech wireless
    Internet Speed
    Classic Australian w.a.p.
    Browser
    Brave
    Antivirus
    KIS
  • Operating System
    Windows 11 Pro (latest upadte ... anally always)
    Computer type
    Laptop
    Manufacturer/Model
    HP Pavillion 15
    CPU
    i7-1165G7 @ 2.80GHz
    Graphics card(s)
    Intel Iris Xe Graphics
    Hard Drives
    Samsung NVMe 512GB
    + numerous/multiple SSD Type C USB enclosures
    Internet Speed
    NBN FTTN 50
    Browser
    Brave
    Antivirus
    KIS

Winuser

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just like ink cartridges in new printers
They ship them with starter cartridges. Why? They sell the printers at a small markup and make it up by over pricing the ink. They also use a chip in the cartridge that makes it harder to use third party ink cartridges.
 

My Computers

System One System Two

  • OS
    Windows 11
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop
    Manufacturer/Model
    PowerSpec B746
    CPU
    Intel Core i7-10700K
    Motherboard
    ASRock Z490 Phantom Gaming 4/ax
    Memory
    16GB (8GB PC4-19200 DDR4 SDRAM x2)
    Graphics Card(s)
    NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1050 TI
    Sound Card
    Realtek Audio
    Monitor(s) Displays
    Samsung SAM0A87 Samsung SAM0D32
    Screen Resolution
    1920 x 1080
    Hard Drives
    NVMe WDC WDS100T2B0C-00PXH0 1TB
    Samsung SSD 860 EVO 1TB
    PSU
    750 Watts (62.5A)
    Case
    PowerSpec/Lian Li ATX 205
    Keyboard
    Logitech K270
    Mouse
    Logitech M185
    Browser
    Microsoft Edge and Firefox
    Antivirus
    ESET Internet Security
  • Operating System
    Windows 11 Dev
    Computer type
    Laptop
    Manufacturer/Model
    HP Envy x360 15-ds1083cl
    CPU
    AMD Ryzen 7 4700U 2.0GHZ
    Memory
    16 MB DDR 4-2666
    Graphics card(s)
    AMD Radeon
    Monitor(s) Displays
    15.6"
    Screen Resolution
    1920x1080
    Hard Drives
    PCIe NVMe M.2 512GB
    Browser
    Firefox, Edge and Edge Canary
    Antivirus
    ESET Internet Security

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