Are there encryption technologies that don't have a backdoor in them?


CSharpDev

Member
Member
Local time
7:28 AM
Posts
180
OS
Win11
Sadly recently BitLocker has been cracked in 43 seconds. I do use BitLocker on all my systems, it's part of the image and scripted in PowerShell. But I don't feel safe that any 3rd entity like police or some other knowledgeable tech guy or whoever can crack any of my BL-encrypted drives

From my perspective, only I am supposed to be able to access my data. This is one of my primary issues with public cloud like G-Drive or OneDrive, it's gonna be someone else's computer in a Data Center., Like, I never store tax returns or any bills on my G-Drive or OneDrive accounts for this reason
 

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    Win11
Bitlocker and most other encryption protocols don't have backdoors. The attack you're talking about happened due to bad board design.

It also required a specific set of skills most people don't possess and also required a TPM that was separate of the CPU. If the TPM is integrated into the CPU this attack doesn't work.

The flaw (not backdoor) is that the key is passed on the wire in plain text from the separated TPM and the guy was able to guess on the signal timing ( the timing signal wasn't exposed ) and then had to build a proto type board and custom code to capture and decode that signal into a plain text bitlocker key.


You could in theory not use the TPM for your key storage and instead use a USB drive, but that is obviously susceptible to other "attack" aka it could just be stolen
 

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    Windows 11
Years ago, I had a company-issued Dell laptop fail from motherboard issues. While waiting for a replacement PC, they loaned me another Dell and I swapped in my old drive. Since BitLocker was mandated by corporate policy, I had to resort to entering my BitLocker recovery key which was printed on a piece of paper every time I powered on.

So yes, if you memorized that long string of digits then your key is secured in only one place. As @neemobeer notes, most encryption attacks are rarely directed on the encryption algorithm but exploit flaws in key management (people or software).
 

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    Windows 7

My Computers

System One System Two

  • OS
    11 Home
    Computer type
    Laptop
    Manufacturer/Model
    Asus TUF Gaming (2024)
    CPU
    i7 13650HX
    Memory
    16GB DDR5
    Graphics Card(s)
    GeForce RTX 4060 Mobile
    Sound Card
    Eastern Electric MiniMax DAC Supreme; Emotiva UMC-200; Astell & Kern AK240
    Monitor(s) Displays
    Sony Bravia XR-55X90J
    Screen Resolution
    3840×2160
    Hard Drives
    512GB SSD internal
    37TB external
    PSU
    Li-ion
    Cooling
    2× Arc Flow Fans, 4× exhaust vents, 5× heatpipes
    Keyboard
    Logitech K800
    Mouse
    Logitech G402
    Internet Speed
    20Mbit/s up, 250Mbit/s down
    Browser
    FF
  • Operating System
    11 Home
    Computer type
    Laptop
    Manufacturer/Model
    Medion S15450
    CPU
    i5 1135G7
    Memory
    16GB DDR4
    Graphics card(s)
    Intel Iris Xe
    Sound Card
    Eastern Electric MiniMax DAC Supreme; Emotiva UMC-200; Astell & Kern AK240
    Monitor(s) Displays
    Sony Bravia XR-55X90J
    Screen Resolution
    3840×2160
    Hard Drives
    2TB SSD internal
    37TB external
    PSU
    Li-ion
    Mouse
    Logitech G402
    Keyboard
    Logitech K800
    Internet Speed
    20Mbit/s up, 250Mbit/s down
    Browser
    FF
The "43-second-hacker" told viewers to activate the Bitlocker PIN protector against that attack.
 

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    Win11

Latest Support Threads

Back
Top Bottom